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How to read the following vector "c" of strings into a list of tables? Which way is the shortest read.table strsplit? e.g. I cant see how to read the table Edit:c[4:6] a[4:6] in one command.

require(car)
m<-matrix(rnorm(16),4,4,byrow=T)
a<-Anova(lm(m~1),type=3,idata=data.frame(treatment=factor(1:4)),idesign=~treatment)
c<-capture.output(summary(a,multivariate=F))
c
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This returns lines 4:6

 c[4:6]

Now if you wanted to parse this I would do it in two steps. First on the column values from rows 5:6 and then add back the names.

> vals <- read.table(text=c[5:6])
> txt <- "                \t    SS\t num Df\t  Error SS\t den Df\t       F\t  Pr(>F)"
> names(vals) <- names(read.delim(text=txt))
> vals
            X         SS num.Df  Error.SS den.Df       F  Pr..F.
1 (Intercept) 0.57613392      1 0.4219563      3 4.09616 0.13614
2   treatment 1.85936442      3 8.2899759      9 0.67287 0.58996
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I was also trying sth. like this and got problems e.g. with the blank between"< 2e-16" and different number of elements per line because of "***" and "< 2e-16". ` –  Klaus Dec 15 '12 at 2:29
    
An alternative would be to use read.fwf, but it would be less 'automatic ' because you would need to first print the output and then calculate the spacing.. –  BondedDust Dec 15 '12 at 2:43
    
I'm thinking that @adibender's approach might be better. –  BondedDust Dec 15 '12 at 2:45

EDIT -- you could look at the source code of the summary function and calculate the quantities required by yourself

getAnywhere(summary.Anova.mlm)

The original idea seems not to work.

c2 <- summary(a)
# find out what 'properties' the summary object has
# turns out, it is just the Anova object
class(c2) <- "list"
names(c2)

This returns

 [1] "SSP"        "SSPE"       "P"          "df"         "error.df"  
 [6] "terms"      "repeated"   "type"       "test"       "idata"     
[11] "idesign"    "icontrasts" "imatrix"    "singular" 

and we can get access them

c2$SSP
c2$SSPE

It seems not a good idea to use R internal c function as a variable name

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Iam not sure if I got you, I think c2 is not what you imagine, str(c2) shows you the interesting values are not listed. –  Klaus Dec 15 '12 at 1:48
    
Which are the interesting values? –  Karsten W. Dec 15 '12 at 1:51
    
Do you not see that c shows different table than your c2? It seems not a good idea to use R internal c function as a variable name sry I used it only for this short example. –  Klaus Dec 15 '12 at 2:00
    
EDIT -- you could look at the source code of the summary function and calculate the quantities required by yourself that is a good solution, I mentioned below, thx to both of you. –  Klaus Dec 15 '12 at 2:22

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