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Okay, so my simple project is supposed to search for all the cases that a particular string is found in a .txt file. Case matters, and if the word is found in another word matters.

(Ex: if the word is "the":

valid finds include:

the apple = 1;

the thespian = 2;

invalid finds include:

fourth elephant (the space between th and e)

The apple (Capitalization)

And if the word IS found in a line of the file, I'm supposed to print out the line ONCE. If it is not found, I'm not supposed to print it at all.

So, for example, one run of my program should output:

Searching for 'the' in file 'test.txt'
2 : that they do not use permeates the [C++] language.  Another example
3 : will further illustrate this influence.  Imagine that an integer
5 : What bit value should be moved into the topmost position?  If we
6 : look at the machine level, architectural designers are divided on
8 : the most significant bit position, while on other machines the sign
9 : bit (which, in the case of a negative number, will be 1) is extended.
10 : Either case can be simulated by the other, using software, by means
# occurrences of 'the' = 13

Unfortunately, I'm getting

Searching for 'the' in the file 'test.txt'
2: that they do not use permeates the [C++] language.  Another example
3: will further illustrate this influence.  Imagine that an integer
5: What bit value should be moved into the topmost position?  If we
6: look at the machine level, architectural designers are divided on
8: the most significant bit position, while on other machines the sign
9: bit (which, in the case of a negative number, will be 1) is extended.
10: Either case can be simulated by the other, using software, by means
11: of a combination of tests and masks.
12: 
# occurrences of 'the' = 15

I am NOT understanding why it thinks it found a "the" in lines 11 and 12.

Here is my code:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
//a char pointer is a c-string
//the array is just an array of char pointers
//argv[0] = pointer to the word to search for
//argv[1] = pointer to fileNames

//includes program name @ 0, so three args
if (argc == 3){

    int wordCounter = 0;

    ifstream myFile(argv[2]);

    if (!myFile){
        cout << "File '" << argv[2] << "' could not be opened" << endl;
        return 1;
    }

    else {
        //counts the number of lines in file
        int counter = 0;

        //holds the new line in the file
        char line[100];

        //copies string into buffer that is length of word
        const char * word = argv[1];

        //holds whether found word
        bool found = false;

        cout << "Searching for '" << word << "' in the file '" << argv[2] << "'" << endl;

        //number of chars in a line
        int numChar = 0;

        //saves every line
        while (!(myFile.getline(line, 100)).eof()) {
            //starts every new new at not having found the word
            found = false;
            //read in new line, so increases line counter
            counter ++;
            numChar = 0;

            //find length of line
            for (int i = 0; line[i] != '\n' && i < 101; i++){
                numChar++;
            }

            //finds how many times the key word appears in one line
            //checks up to a few before the end of the line for the word
            if (numChar >= strlen(argv[1])){
                for (int i = 0; i < numChar - strlen(argv[1]); i++){

                    //if the current line letter equals the first letter of the key word
                    if (line[i] == word[0]){

                        //continue looking forward to see if the rest of it match
                        for (int j = 0; j < strlen(argv[1]); j++){

                            //if word doesn't match break
                            if (word[j] != line [i+j]){
                                break;
                            }

                            //if matches all the way to end, add counter
                            if(j == strlen(argv[1]) - 1){
                                wordCounter++;
                                found = true;
                            }
                        }//end 2ndfor
                    }
                }//end 1stfor

                //if the key word has been found, print the line
                if (found){
                    cout << counter << ": " << line << endl;
                }
            }
        }//endwhile

        cout << "# occurrences of '" << word << "' = " << wordCounter << endl;
        myFile.close();
    }//end else
}//end if
return 0;
}//end main
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Mitch Wheat, Benjamin Bannier, WhozCraig, Rory McCrossan, Graviton Dec 19 '12 at 2:58

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Urg, aren't you allowed to use std::string? –  Benjamin Bannier Dec 15 '12 at 3:10
    
std::string + while-loop makes this problem trivial. If your instructor doesn't let you use such standard lib entities they are officially so far detached from reality they have earned the title they no-doubt have. –  WhozCraig Dec 17 '12 at 12:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The cause that your programme believes there is a "the" in lines 11 and 12 is

for (int i = 0; line[i] != '\n' && i < 101; i++)

that you check for a newline (which isn't in the buffer, by the way), but not for the terminating 0. So you check the entire 100 characters -- one more actually, since you also check the nonexistent line[100], and count the "the"s left over from previous lines.

for (int i = 0; i < 100 && line[i] != '\0' && line[i] != '\n'; i++)

should fix that.

Check the validity of the index first to avoid undefined behaviour due to invalid memory accesses.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow. thank you. That makes complete sense. I feel silly now. –  katiea Dec 15 '12 at 3:18
  • getline(ifstream&,string) would be more efficient to use in your case when reading lines, in some cases the line might go beyond 100 characters(these characters include whitespaces) and mess the count up. This function will read into the string until an endline is encountered
  • You don't loop through your file correctly, this could cause undefined behavior and in this case add to your strange number of lines, a correct file loop would be:

//program counts the number of lines in a file
getline(myFile,line) //grab the line
while(myFile) //while the filestream is open and reading
{
    //manipulate line string
    lineCount++;
    getline(myFile,line) //re-read in next line
}
share|improve this answer
    
What about checking for the end of the file? We need that .eof() check, right? –  katiea Dec 15 '12 at 3:07
    
ifstream holds an internal bool that relates to if the file is good or bad, simply writing while(myFile) will return that bool to check if the files input stream is still good. –  Syntactic Fructose Dec 15 '12 at 3:09
    
Adding this concept results in a conversation error from void* to char** -- > I have never seen this error before. Changed code: getline(myFile, line); //saves every line while (myFile) { //starts every new new at not having found the word found = false; //read in new line, so increases line counter counter ++; numChar = 0; . . . getline(myFile, line); }//endwhile –  katiea Dec 15 '12 at 3:13
    
that's because you're using c strings, which are outdated and over complicate c++ code. Changing your code to strings would simplify your code immensely. –  Syntactic Fructose Dec 15 '12 at 3:16
    
Unfortunately, we are to use c strings for this simple project. –  katiea Dec 15 '12 at 3:20

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