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I have a list of 30 numbers:

[1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, 32, 33, 35, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47, 48]

I'm printing out all possible 8 digit combinations, which is working great using this code:

possible_combinations = itertools.combinations(dedup_list, 8) 

combos = []
for e in possible_combinations:
    combos.append(e)
print combos

What I'd like to do now is eliminate ALL combinations containing consecutive 3 digit numbers, for example:

[1, 5, 9,22, 23, 24, 33, 37]

Suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
How do you want to handle consecutive sequences of length greater than length 3? What's the desired output for 1,20,21,22,23,24,30? –  Mr Fooz Dec 15 '12 at 4:09
    
that's a very good point, because there would be instances of 4 or 5 consecutive numbers. I'd like to eliminate all 3+ occurrences. –  Trapp Dec 15 '12 at 4:12
    
just leading digit or anywhere? –  Anycorn Dec 15 '12 at 4:13
    
Do you want to not generate combinations if they have N consecutive numbers or do you want to simply discard the ones that match this criteria ? Since these combinations are sorted, what is the problem going through each sequence and checking where two consecutive numbers have unitary difference and verify how many times that repeat consecutively ? –  mmgp Dec 15 '12 at 4:13
    
Anycorn - anywhere within the sequence. –  Trapp Dec 15 '12 at 4:16

4 Answers 4

I think this does the trick:

from itertools import combinations, groupby
from operator import itemgetter

data = [1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, 32, 33, 35, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47, 48]

def find_consecutive(lst, min_string=3):
    for k, g in groupby(enumerate(lst), lambda (i,x):i-x):
        num_string = map(itemgetter(1), g)
        if len(num_string) >= 3:
            yield num_string

for i in combinations(data, 8):
    if not any(find_consecutive(i, min_string=3)):
        print i

returns:

(1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 15, 19)
(1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 15, 20)
(1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 15, 22)
(1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 15, 23)
(1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 15, 24)

...et cetera, et cetera

share|improve this answer

This probably won't win any efficiency awards, but you get style points for the list comprehensions.

This is how I would approach the problem. Make a list of a sliding window of size 3.

>>> nums = [1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, 32, 33, 35, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 47, 48]
>>> [nums[i:i+3] for i in xrange(len(nums))]
[[1, 3, 5], [3, 5, 6], [5, 6, 7], [6, 7, 8], [7, 8, 9], [8, 9, 10], [9, 10, 15], [10, 15, 19], [15, 19, 20], [19, 20, 22], [20, 22, 23], [22, 23, 24], [23, 24, 26], [24, 26, 27], [26, 27, 28], [27, 28, 32], [28, 32, 33], [32, 33, 35], [33, 35, 37], [35, 37, 38], [37, 38, 39], [38, 39, 40], [39, 40, 41], [40, 41, 42], [41, 42, 43], [42, 43, 44], [43, 44, 47], [44, 47, 48], [47, 48], [48]]

Next step, get rid of the consecutive items, which is trivially easy now. This predicate will get cleverly filter out the consecutive items.

>>> [nums[i] for i in xrange(len(nums)) if nums[i:i+3] != range(nums[i],nums[i]+3)]
[1, 3, 9, 10, 15, 19, 20, 23, 24, 27, 28, 32, 33, 35, 43, 44, 47, 48]

EDIT:

Eric brought up a good point, the solution above does not work entirely. If you want this to work, then predicate is going to need some beefing up. First, I derived these equations. They perform the windowing operation. Convince yourself that they are true:

a = [1,2,3,4,5]
i = 2
a[i-0:i+3] == range(a[i-0], a[i]+3) # left
a[i-1:i+2] == range(a[i-1], a[i]+2) # center
a[i-2:i+1] == range(a[i-2], a[i]+1) # right

Then you could jam it in there sideways...

[a for i,a in enumerate(nums) if all(nums[i-j:i+k] != range(nums[i-j], nums[i]+k) for j,k in zip(xrange(0,3,1), xrange(3,0,-1)))]

But if you don't want to get shot, pull out the predicate into a function:

consec_to_buddies = lambda i, xs: (
    xs[i-0:i+3] == range(xs[i-0], xs[i]+3) or
    xs[i-1:i+2] == range(xs[i-1], xs[i]+2) or
    xs[i-2:i+1] == range(xs[i-2], xs[i]+1)
)

[a for i,a in enumerate(nums) if not consec_to_buddies(i, nums)]

Again, this isn't the most efficient, as you will be calculating the predicate for every item, even if you already know you are taking it out. The price you pay for elegance :)

share|improve this answer
    
This is an awesome list comprehension but only removes the first of the three consecutive. (Example: 22, 23, 24 -> 23, 24) –  Eric Dec 15 '12 at 4:40

Not the slick itemgetter technique like hexparrot, closer to how Balthamos did it in their post.

sec = []
for combo in combo_lst:
    seq = combo[:]
    for i in combo:
        if list(combo[combo.index(i):combo.index(i)+3]) == range(i, i+3):
            break
        combo = combo[combo.index(i)+1:]
        if len(combo) == 0:
            sec.append(seq)
            break
share|improve this answer

Here's one way by calculating the differences (similar to numpy's diff):

def diff(lst):
    return map(lambda x,y: y-x, lst[:-1],lst[1:])

def remove_consecutive(lst):
    previous = None
    for i, current in enumerate(diff(lst)):
        if previous != 1 and current != 1:
            yield lst[i]
        previous = current
    if current != 1:
        yield lst[-1]

list(remove_consecutive([1, 5, 9, 22, 23, 24, 33, 37]))
# [1, 5, 9, 33, 37]

Which works from the observation that an item is not consecutive only if neither the previous and the next differences are 1.

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