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Say I have a function:

function foo(){
    // do a bunch of stuff, manipulate DOM, etc.
    // and then:
    if(some_condition) return true;
    else return false;
}

Since it would be nice to both execute the function's "bunch of stuff" AND use its return value at the same moment, I'm wondering if it's right to do this:

if( foo() ){ // foo happens right here
    // do some stuff because foo returned true
}

Is this correct syntax and usage?

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I'm not sure, but I'm highly interested. You should test it and tell us if it worked –  Sterling Archer Dec 15 '12 at 6:20
    
Ya its correct only.. –  senK Dec 15 '12 at 6:21
3  
That syntax is correct and will do what you want, but that's not using a function as a parameter. (Note also that if some_condition is actually a boolean you can just say return some_condition.) –  nnnnnn Dec 15 '12 at 6:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is absolutely fine. Even if foo doesn't return a boolean value, the return will be forced boolean, so in any case it is fine to do this.

What your're doing is just not substituting a variable for the return value of foo().

The only time this would be a problem is if foo() return different values, in which case if you want the value to be the same throughout your code, you have to set the return value to a variable and use that variable instead.

BTW, this is one of the basics of javascript. Unless you're just starting, you should know this already.

Oh, and as people have said in the comments, this is not using a function as a parameter. Using a function as a parameter would be doing this:

function bar(a) {
    // do something with a
}
function foo(){ 
    // blah blah blah
}
var thing = bar(foo); // notice no parentheses `()` after foo
// do something with thing
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While I'm not using the function itself as a parameter, I am calling the function so it returns a parameter. If you can suggest a better way of wording the question I'll be glad to edit it. –  Isaac Lubow Dec 15 '12 at 6:40

Seems alright to me? You're not using a function as a parameter, you're just doing this:

var ret = foo();
if( ret ){     
}

Possibly some browsers might do optimisations between the two and a very low level. (I imagine maybe because in your case the return value isn't used anywhere else.)

But the idea/semantics remain the same.

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Like everyone else stated it'll work as you expect it to. I would just like to suggest one optimization:

function foo(){
    // do a bunch of stuff, manipulate DOM, etc.
    // and then:
    return ++some_condition;
}

If some_condition is a truthy value (1, "abc", {}, []) then ++some_condition will express true. Else it will express false.

Then you may use it as you wanted to:

if (foo()) { // foo happens right here
    // do some stuff because foo returned true
}
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