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#include <stdio.h>

void call(int n )
{
    if ( n > 0 )
    {
        call(--n) ;
        printf("\n%d",n) ;
        call(--n) ;
    }
}

int main(void )
{
    int a = 3 ;
    call(a) ;
    return 0 ;
}

In the above mentioned code i am having a difficulty to understand the logic behind it. I am getting 0 1 2 0 as the output. Why?

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3  
Use a debugger to find out, so compile with gcc -Wall -g prog.c -o binprog, then gdb binprog and run it step by step (s command of gdb), using the bt command of gdb to get backtraces. Explaining recursion is difficult, you need to get the insight about it. –  Basile Starynkevitch Dec 15 '12 at 8:04
    
That output is correct. As suggeste3d by Basile, run it through debugger to understand the flow. –  anishsane Dec 15 '12 at 8:09

3 Answers 3

First, find your base case: call(n), when n<=0 does nothing and just returns.

In the general case for code(n) the definition says: "decrement n and recurse (all the way down); when the control is back, print n (its value is preserved), decrement again and recurse again".

Or, with equations:

call(n) | when(n<=0) = NO-OP
call(n) | otherwise  = call(n-1), print(n-1), call(n-2)

So,

call(1) = call(0), print(0), call(-1)
        = print(0)

call(2) = call(1), print(1), call(0)
        = print(0), print(1)

call(3) = call(2), print(2), call(1)
        = (print(0), print(1)), print(2), print(0)

Continuing,

call(4) = 0120+3+01
call(5) = 0120301+4+0120
call(6) = 012030140120+5+0120301
....

It seems we can generate the indefinite sequence of resulting outputs, maintaining just the two most recent values:

(n,a,b) --> (n+1,b,b+n+a)

So instead of recursion down towards the base case, this describes corecursion up away from the starting case, (2,0,1) (the 1 case is covered by a special fact (1,_,0)). We can code it as an actual indefinitely growing (i.e. "infinite") sequence, or we can just make an infinite loop out of it.

What would be the purpose of such non-terminating computations? To describe the computation of the results, in general. But of course it is extremely easy to cut short such computation when we reach a target value for n.

The benefit? Instead of recursion, we get an iterative loop!

output(1) = "0"
output(n) | when(n>1) = 
   let {i = 2, a="0", b="1"}
   while( i<n ):
      i,a,b = (i+1),b,(b+"i"+a)
   return b
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When trying to understand code flow I can't wrap my head against I use a simple strategy:

log the output in a detailed manner. For instance, instead of having a simple printf statement in your call function you can map the flow of the application. Here's an example

#include <stdio.h>

void call(int n, int depth)
{
    printf("%.*s(enter) n is (%d)\n", ++depth, "-----", n);
    if ( n > 0 )
    {
        call(--n, depth) ;

        call(--n, depth) ;
    }
    printf("%.*s(exit) n is (%d)\n", depth--, "-----", n);
}

int main(void )
{

    int a = 3 ;

    call(a, 0) ;
    getchar();
    return 0 ;
}

This will result in:

-(enter) n is (3)
--(enter) n is (2)
---(enter) n is (1)
----(enter) n is (0)
----(exit) n is (0)
----(enter) n is (-1)
----(exit) n is (-1)
---(exit) n is (-1)
---(enter) n is (0)
---(exit) n is (0)
--(exit) n is (0)
--(enter) n is (1)
---(enter) n is (0)
---(exit) n is (0)
---(enter) n is (-1)
---(exit) n is (-1)
--(exit) n is (-1)
-(exit) n is (1)
share|improve this answer
call(3)
│ n3=3
│ --n3 (n3=2)
├╴call(2)
│ │ n2=2
│ │ --n2 (n2=1)
│ ├╴call(1)
│ │ │ n1=1
│ │ │ --n1 (n1=0)
│ │ ├╴call(0)
│ │ │ └ return
│ │ │
│ │ │ printf("\n0");           ⇦ 0
│ │ │
│ │ │ --n1 (n1=-1)
│ │ ├╴call(-1)
│ │ │ └ return
│ │ └ return
│ │
│ │ printf("\n1")              ⇦ 1
│ │
│ │ --n2 (n2=0)
│ ├╴call(0)
│ │ └ return
│ └ return
│
│ printf("\n2");               ⇦ 2
│
│ --n3 (n3=1)
├╴call(1)
│ │ n1=1
│ │ --n1 (n2=0)
│ ├╴call(0)
│ │ └ return
│ │
│ │ printf("\n0");             ⇦ 0
│ │
│ │ --n1 (n1=-1)
│ ├╴call(-1)
│ │ └ return
│ └ return
└ return
share|improve this answer
    
+1 to you ..How to draw this tree? –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 15 '12 at 8:57
1  
@GrijeshChauhan I copied the characters from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Box-drawing_character. –  John Kugelman Dec 15 '12 at 9:05
    
its best way to explain. –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 15 '12 at 9:08

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