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Here's the problem: I'm given a matrix like

Input:

1 1 1
1 1 1
1 1 1

At each step, I need to find a "second" matrix of 1's and 0's with no two 1's on the same row or column. Then, I'll subtract the second matrix from the original matrix. I will repeat the process until I get a matrix with all 0's. Furthermore, I need to take the least possible number of steps.

I need to print all the "second" matrices in O(n) time. In the above example I can get to the null matrix in 3 steps by subtracting these three matrices in order:

Expected output:

1 0 0
0 1 0
0 0 1

0 0 1
1 0 0
0 1 0

0 1 0
0 0 1
1 0 0

I have coded an attempt, in which I am finding the first maximum value and creating the second matrices based on the index of that value. But for the above input I am getting 4 output matrices, which is wrong:

My output:

1 0 0 
0 1 0 
0 0 1 

0 1 0 
1 0 0 
0 0 0 

0 0 1 
0 0 0 
1 0 0 

0 0 0 
0 0 1 
0 1 0  

My solution works for most of the test cases but fails for the one given above. Can someone give me some pointers on how to proceed, or find an algorithm that guarantees optimality?

Test case that works:

Input:

0 2 1
0 0 0
3 0 0

Output

0 1 0
0 0 0
1 0 0

0 1 0
0 0 0
1 0 0 

0 0 1
0 0 0
1 0 0
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Can you explain what you're trying to do? I can't really see from the examples you gave. –  Blender Dec 15 '12 at 9:24
    
I am not using any algorithm...I am just getting the row/column maximum and decrementing the first non zero value. –  user1459032 Dec 15 '12 at 9:25
    
What do you mean by the row/column maximum? –  irrelephant Dec 15 '12 at 9:25
    
I am trying to get to all 0's in minimum number of iterations .. one row can decrement the value of one column at most and vice versa in one loop... –  user1459032 Dec 15 '12 at 9:26
    
For example in the 3x3 matrix the row/column max is 3. to I am choosing that... –  user1459032 Dec 15 '12 at 9:26

5 Answers 5

Summing of each row / column and taking the largest of those sums gives you the optimal number of matrix subtractions required to reduce to a null matrix.


For example:

1 2 4 0 = 7
2 2 0 1 = 5
0 0 1 0 = 1
3 0 2 1 = 6
= = = =
6 4 7 2

Which means that this matrix will take 7 optimal subtractions to empty.


I believe that counting backwards from this and removing from columns / row with that value will solve your problem (I am not sure of an efficient way of selecting these - brute force?).
You can also use your previous method to remove extra elements.


For example (using the above matrix).

Step 7:
We must subtract from row 1 & column 3.

0 0 1 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0

Solves this, so now we can use your previous method to remove "bonus" elements.

0 0 1 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1

Now apply the sum of each row / column again and continue for the next step.

Step 6:

1 2 3 0 = 6
1 2 0 1 = 4
0 0 1 0 = 1
3 0 2 0 = 5
= = = =
5 4 6 1

Next subtraction:

0 0 1 0
0 1 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0

And so on.


Note: This still does not work very well with "all 1" matrices, as you get stuck on the problem of selecting 1 from every row and column (same as you did in your example).

But someone may be able to extend my solution.

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Let Number of rows = Number of columns = N

for iteration=1:N
  for row=1:N
      cell(row,(row+iteration)%N) := 0

Number of iterations is N. In every iteration N one's will be changed to 0

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No this does not work as it decrements all the row elements to 0. i.e a[0][0], a[0][1] and a[0][2] are all decremented to 0 in the first round. The problem is when you decrement the value it has to be in a different row/column. –  user1459032 Dec 15 '12 at 9:49
    
@user1459032 In this first round, the values decremented will be a[0][0], a[1][1], a[2][2] and so on. If all values are 0 or 1 and number of values is N then my solution will work. I get your point if this is not the case. –  Sajal Jain Dec 15 '12 at 10:00
    
they need not be 0 or 1 –  user1459032 Dec 15 '12 at 10:03
    
I need to decrement the value by 1 each time –  user1459032 Dec 15 '12 at 10:03

I'm not entirely sure if this is what you are after, but could you create a list of available columns and mark them as used for each iteration.

For Example:

repeat until an empty matrix
  mark all columns as available
  for each row
    find the maximum value in all available columns and store it's coordinates
    mark that column as unavailable
  print, decrement and clear the list of stored coordinates

This doesn't work, but it does show the algorithm that user1459032 is using.

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Does not give optimal sol of the first test case that I have provided... –  user1459032 Dec 15 '12 at 10:22

1) If all you want to do is iterate through all the elements in your matrix...

2) then all you have to do is loop for (int i=0; i < rows*cols; i++) {} ...

3) And such a loop is ALREADY O(n) (i.e. it increases LINEARLY with the #/elements in your matrix)

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I think it's more complicated than that. :-) –  irrelephant Dec 15 '12 at 9:29
    
The condition is that you cannot decrement a value in the same column or row .. –  user1459032 Dec 15 '12 at 9:31
2  
@paulsm4 the convention when talking about matrix algorithms is than N is the number of rows or columns, not the product of the number of rows and columns. For example, matrix multiplication is O(N**3) - a 2x2 matrix takes ~2x8 operations, a 3x3 ~ 2x27 operations. So your algorithm is O(N**2). See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strassen_algorithm#Asymptotic_complexity or any other matrix algorithm description for examples of this convention. –  Pete Kirkham Dec 15 '12 at 10:03

I'm pretty sure that this is some kind of variant of the exact cover problem, which is known to be NP-complete. Your proposed algorithm is a simple greedy solution. The problem with greedy solutions is that they often work well enough to convince you that greed is good and then suddenly leave you high and dry looking for a better solution. (Consider the global economy, for example.) Anyway, Knuth's Dancing Links technique is a standard way of solving the problem (exact set cover, not global economy).

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