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Is it good practice to put the implementation of a pure virtual interface in a cpp and skip the header file completely?

A.h
struct A
{
    virtual void func() = 0;
};
B.cpp
class B : public A
{
   virtual void func() override {
   ...
   }
}
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2  
If B itself doesn't need to be accessible outside the translation unit, then I don't see why not. –  NPE Dec 15 '12 at 10:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Somebody must use the class B, and they have to get instances of B from somewhere even if they only ever address them via an A*. So you could have for example:

A.h

struct A
{
    virtual void func() = 0;
    virtual ~A() {}
};

B.h

#include "A.h"
A *Bfactory();

B.cpp

#include "B.h"
struct B : public A { ... };
A *Bfactory() { return new B(); }

On the other hand, that's quite a "weak" factory function because it only ever returns instances of B. Perhaps there will be another factory function somewhere that creates different derived classes of A according to its parameters. That function would need to include A.h, B.h, C.h etc, but if it always uses Bfactory to create the instances of B then it doesn't need the class definition of B. So in that case it's fine for the class definition to only exist in B.cpp.

Btw, I've returned a raw pointer from the factory. In real life you might prefer to return a unique_ptr or other smart pointer. If you do so, then it is in fact possible to avoid the need for a virtual destructor in A. But I doubt that it's very often worth it.

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1  
but cant you but a static function inside struct A, something like, static A* create_b(); static A* create_c(); and then in the B.cpp you do A* A::create_b() { return new B; } –  hidayat Dec 15 '12 at 10:55
1  
@hidayat: you can. I don't usually design base classes that are supposed to "know about" all their derived classes, but it works. Likewise, in my code you could move the declaration of the free function Bfactory from B.h to A.h. You will anger and upset a few people if you declare a function in A.h and define it in B.cpp (especially if it's a member function of the class A). But they'll survive. –  Steve Jessop Dec 15 '12 at 11:00

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