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string whatTime(int seconds) {

 string h,m,s,ans;
 stringstream ss;

 ss << (seconds/3600); 
 seconds -= (3600*(seconds/3600));
 ss >> h;
 ss.str("");

 ss << (seconds/60);
 seconds -= (60*(seconds/60));
 ss >> m;
 ss.str("");

 ss << seconds;
 ss >> s;


 return (h + ":" + m + ":" + s );

}

Output for above program is coming in this format "some_value::" I have also tried ss.str(std::string()) and ss.str().clear() but even that doesn't work. Could somebody please suggest any ways how to tackle this problem?

share|improve this question
    
Did you try to first fill it and after read it? Because now you fill then read ... Try fill fill fill, read read read. No clear needed. –  fonZ Dec 15 '12 at 11:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You've correctly emptied the string buffer with ss.str(""), but you also need to clear the stream's error state with ss.clear(), otherwise no further reads will be attemped after the first extraction, which led to an EOF condition.

So:

string whatTime(int seconds) {

 string h,m,s,ans;
 stringstream ss;

 ss << (seconds/3600); 
 seconds -= (3600*(seconds/3600));
 ss >> h;
 ss.str("");
 ss.clear();

 ss << (seconds/60);
 seconds -= (60*(seconds/60));
 ss >> m;
 ss.str("");
 ss.clear();

 ss << seconds;
 ss >> s;


 return (h + ":" + m + ":" + s );

}

However, if this is your full code and you do not need the individual variables for any reason, I'd do this:

std::string whatTime(const int seconds_n)
{
    std::stringstream ss;

    const int hours   = seconds_n / 3600;
    const int minutes = (seconds_n / 60) % 60;
    const int seconds = seconds_n % 60;

    ss << std::setfill('0');
    ss << std::setw(2) << hours << ':'
       << std::setw(2) << minutes << ':'
       << std::setw(2) << seconds;

    return ss.str();
}

It's much simpler. See it working here.

In C++11 you can avoid the stream altogether using std::to_string, but that doesn't allow you to zero-pad.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for your simpler method. –  ctor Dec 15 '12 at 12:06
1  
thanks for suggesting simpler method. –  rishabh Dec 15 '12 at 12:23

You need to call the clear method of the stringstream rather than on the string returned by the stringstream using ss.clear().

string whatTime(int seconds) {

 string h,m,s,ans;
 stringstream ss;

 ss << (seconds/3600); 
 seconds -= (3600*(seconds/3600));
 ss >> h;
 ss.str("");
 ss.clear();

 ss << (seconds/60);
 seconds -= (60*(seconds/60));
 ss >> m;
 ss.str("");
 ss.clear();

 ss << seconds;
 ss >> s;


 return (h + ":" + m + ":" + s );

}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, could you please tell why it's necessary to use ss.clear() and why I was getting an empty string? –  rishabh Dec 15 '12 at 11:54
    
@rishabh, It's necessary because you want to clear the stringstream itself. The methods you called ss.str().clear() was clearing an object of type string that was returned by the stringstream. –  ctor Dec 15 '12 at 11:56
    
No. ss.clear() clears the stream's error bits. ss.str("") is the correct way to empty the buffer. You should use both. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 15 '12 at 11:57
    
When you read the entire contents of the stream, like in ss >> h;, you have also reached EOF for the stream. That state sticks until you clear it. –  Bo Persson Dec 15 '12 at 11:57
    
@ctor: ss.str("") does nothing on anything "returned by" the stringstream - it sets the value of the internal string buffer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 15 '12 at 11:58

You only need the stringstream, nothing else. All the rest is pure overhead.

string whatTime(int seconds) {
    stringstream ss;

    ss << setFill('0');
    ss << setw(2) << (seconds/3600) << ":"         // hours
       << setw(2) << ((seconds / 60) % 60) << ":"  // minutes
       << setw(2) << (seconds%60);                 // seconds

    return ss.str();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Intermediate const variables provide no overhead, yet a significant increase in readability. And, btw, your whatTime(5) returns "0:0:5" which is ew –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 15 '12 at 14:00
    
Then you can add std::setw(2) and setfill('0') like you did in your example. And its still readable i think if you put it on different lines because if you talk about time you usually know that there are hours minutes and seconds. –  fonZ Dec 15 '12 at 23:31
    
Being explicit and clear with zero downside? Better. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 16 '12 at 14:16

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