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I am using Ruby on Rails 3.2.9 and I would like to validate that the first char of a name (a String) is not a number (Integer). I am trying to use the following code:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  validates_each :name do |record, attr, value|
    record.errors.add(attr, 'cannot begin with a number') if ... # the first char is a number
  end
end

How can I make that?

share|improve this question
    
Do you want to validate before inserting row in to DB? –  suresh.g Dec 15 '12 at 12:28
    
@suresh.g - Yes, to validate before inserting row in to DB. –  user12882 Dec 15 '12 at 12:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
record.errors.add(attr, 'cannot begin with a number') if value =~ /^[0-9].*/

that will match any string whose first character is a number

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain just a little more about your regex? For example, how does it work on matching the first char? –  user12882 Dec 15 '12 at 12:34
1  
on the regexp, the ^ character says "match from the beginning of the string, the [0-9] says on this position, the character could be any contained within 0-9, usually you use 0-9, A-Z and a-z, and then .* says after that, just match anything at all. So the regexp says "Match any string whose first character is a number and the rest I don't really care :P" –  rorra Dec 15 '12 at 12:37
2  
Technically, it doesn't really do that. You really want: /\A\d/ –  pguardiario Dec 15 '12 at 12:49
    
Just learned a new thing :) So "ffdsa\n3fdsa\n" =~ /^[0-9].*/ will say that there is an error, because using ^ instead of \A run the regexp again on every new line.... regarding the \d and [0-9] they are the same, \d is just an abbreviation :) –  rorra Dec 15 '12 at 12:56
1  
[0-9] and \d are the same technically, but \d is simpler, easier for us to parse and understand in a glance, and, as a result, less error-prone. Adding .* is just showing you don't understand how patterns work; .* accomplishes nothing for this task, but adds an extra instruction for the engine to do. –  the Tin Man Dec 15 '12 at 15:09

Looking at the answers, there was a range of different ways for testing. Some made me wonder if they'd be magically faster, so, as usual, I did a benchmark:

require 'benchmark'

puts "Ruby = #{ RUBY_VERSION }"
str = 'foobar'

puts 'correct result should be false...'
puts !!( str =~ /^\d/                           )
puts !!( str =~ /\A\d/                          )
puts !!( str =~ /^[0-9].*/                      )
puts !!( str.split('').first.to_i.is_a?(Fixnum) )
puts !!( (48..57).include?(str[0])              )

puts !!( ('0'..'9') === str[0]                  )
puts !!( str[/^\d/]                             )
puts !!( str[/\A\d/]                            )
puts !!( str[/\A[0-9]/]                         )
puts !!( str =~ /\A[0-9]/                       )

puts

n = 1_000_000

puts "n = 1_000_000"
puts "str = 'foobar'"
Benchmark::bm(17) do |b|
  b.report('^\d regex')         { n.times { str =~ /^\d/                           } }
  b.report('\A\d regex')        { n.times { str =~ /\A\d/                          } }
  b.report('^[0-9].* regex')    { n.times { str =~ /^[0-9].*/                      } }
  b.report('start_with?')       { n.times { str.start_with?(*('0'..'9'))           } }
  b.report("split('')")         { n.times { str.split('').first.to_i.is_a?(Fixnum) } }
  b.report("(48..57).include?") { n.times { (48..57).include?(str[0])              } }

  b.report('range')           { n.times { ('0'..'9') === str[0] } }
  b.report('str[/^\d/]')      { n.times { str[/^\d/]            } }
  b.report('str[/\A\d/]')     { n.times { str[/\A\d/]           } }
  b.report('str[\A[0-9]')     { n.times { str[/\A[0-9]/]        } }
  b.report('\A[0-9] regex')   { n.times { str =~ /\A[0-9]/      } }
end

puts

str = 'foobar' * 1000
puts "str = 'foobar' * 1000"
Benchmark::bm(17) do |b|
  b.report('^\d regex')         { n.times { str =~ /^\d/                 } }
  b.report('\A\d regex')        { n.times { str =~ /\A\d/                } }
  b.report('^[0-9].* regex')    { n.times { str =~ /^[0-9].*/            } }
  b.report('start_with?')       { n.times { str.start_with?(*('0'..'9')) } }
  b.report("(48..57).include?") { n.times { (48..57).include?(str[0])    } }

  b.report('range')           { n.times { ('0'..'9') === str[0] } }
  b.report('str[/^\d/]')      { n.times { str[/^\d/]            } }
  b.report('str[/\A\d/]')     { n.times { str[/\A\d/]           } }
  b.report('str[\A[0-9]')     { n.times { str[/\A[0-9]/]        } }
  b.report('\A[0-9] regex')   { n.times { str =~ /\A[0-9]/      } }
end

Test results:

Ruby = 1.9.3
correct result should be false...
false
false
false
true
false
false
false
false
false
false

Benchmark results:

n = 1_000_000
str = 'foobar'
                        user     system      total        real
^\d regex           0.590000   0.000000   0.590000 (  0.593534)
\A\d regex          0.560000   0.000000   0.560000 (  0.556304)
^[0-9].* regex      0.580000   0.000000   0.580000 (  0.577662)
start_with?         4.020000   0.000000   4.020000 (  4.025604)
split('')           6.850000   0.000000   6.850000 (  6.872157)
(48..57).include?  17.260000   0.780000  18.040000 ( 18.038887)
range               1.260000   0.000000   1.260000 (  1.258191)
str[/^\d/]          0.680000   0.000000   0.680000 (  0.680291)
str[/\A\d/]         0.660000   0.000000   0.660000 (  0.663305)
str[\A[0-9]         0.670000   0.000000   0.670000 (  0.670242)
\A[0-9] regex       0.570000   0.000000   0.570000 (  0.574152)

To test whether \A was faster than ^ and see what effect long strings would have, I increased the string size. "split('')" was pulled because it didn't complete after 60+ seconds:

str = 'foobar' * 1000
                        user     system      total        real
^\d regex          15.010000   0.000000  15.010000 ( 15.020488)
\A\d regex          0.540000   0.010000   0.550000 (  0.539736)
^[0-9].* regex     15.000000   0.000000  15.000000 ( 15.011137)
start_with?         4.010000   0.000000   4.010000 (  4.010340)
(48..57).include?  17.320000   0.770000  18.090000 ( 18.124795)
range               1.250000   0.000000   1.250000 (  1.255724)
str[/^\d/]         15.120000   0.010000  15.130000 ( 15.142242)
str[/\A\d/]         0.650000   0.000000   0.650000 (  0.656198)
str[\A[0-9]         0.650000   0.000000   0.650000 (  0.652306)
\A[0-9] regex       0.550000   0.000000   0.550000 (  0.544415)

I retested with 1.8.7:

Ruby = 1.8.7
correct result should be false...
false
false
false
true
false
false
false
false
false
false

n = 1_000_000
str = 'foobar'
                       user     system      total        real
^\d regex          0.570000   0.000000   0.570000 (  0.565397)
\A\d regex         0.550000   0.000000   0.550000 (  0.552270)
^[0-9].* regex     0.570000   0.000000   0.570000 (  0.574705)
start_with?       38.180000   0.070000  38.250000 ( 39.864171)
split('')          9.750000   0.040000   9.790000 ( 11.025962)
(48..57).include?  0.580000   0.000000   0.580000 (  0.917499)
range              2.420000   0.020000   2.440000 (  3.170774)
str[/^\d/]         0.700000   0.000000   0.700000 (  0.760180)
str[/\A\d/]        0.680000   0.000000   0.680000 (  0.762636)
str[\A[0-9]        0.660000   0.010000   0.670000 (  0.795043)
\A[0-9] regex      0.600000   0.000000   0.600000 (  0.684566)

str = 'foobar' * 1000
                       user     system      total        real
^\d regex          7.900000   0.040000   7.940000 ( 10.735175)
\A\d regex         0.600000   0.010000   0.610000 (  0.784001)
^[0-9].* regex     7.850000   0.020000   7.870000 (  8.251673)
(48..57).include?  0.580000   0.000000   0.580000 (  0.683730)
range              2.380000   0.020000   2.400000 (  2.738234)
str[/^\d/]         7.930000   0.010000   7.940000 (  8.227906)
str[/\A\d/]        0.670000   0.000000   0.670000 (  0.682169)
str[\A[0-9]        0.680000   0.000000   0.680000 (  0.697340)
\A[0-9] regex      0.580000   0.000000   0.580000 (  0.645136)

Discuss among yourselves.

share|improve this answer
    
Why does the range example work efficiently here for long strings? –  Eric Walker Dec 16 '12 at 3:10
    
Honestly, I don't know. I expected an anchored regex to run away with the fastest time, and was surprised by range. –  the Tin Man Dec 16 '12 at 3:12
    
/^\d/ still has to check the entire string, whereas /\A\d/ can fail right away –  pguardiario Dec 16 '12 at 7:33
    
Good point! I'll add that test in. –  the Tin Man Dec 16 '12 at 11:30

Just found out you can splat a Range:

"1hello".start_with?(*('0'..'9')) #=> true
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you can, but it turns it into an array, which is going to be less efficient than a simple regex. –  the Tin Man Dec 15 '12 at 15:20
    
@the Tin Man: Not an array (it would result in an error), but an argument list. Benchmarked it and yes, it is about 5 times slower. Interesting is that on longer strings ("1hello"*100) start_with? is faster –  steenslag Dec 15 '12 at 16:09
    
Well, argument list or array, it looks like this in IRB: irb(main):004:0> asdf = *('0'..'9') => ["0", "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9"] and quacks this way: irb(main):005:0> asdf.class => Array –  the Tin Man Dec 16 '12 at 2:23

You can get the first character of the string with array access and compare the ascii value:

1.8.7 :008 > (48..57).include?("5ssdfsdf"[0])
 => true 
1.8.7 :009 > (48..57).include?("ssdfsdf"[0])
 => false 
1.8.7 :010 > (48..57).include?("0sdfsdf"[0])
 => true 
1.8.7 :011 > (48..57).include?("9sdfsdf"[0])
 => true 
share|improve this answer
    
This does OK with 1.8.7, but doesn't perform well with 1.9+. See the benchmarks. –  the Tin Man Dec 16 '12 at 12:40

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