Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Good afternoon,

Do you think you could explain to me what a value on the right side of the if statement means? In the example which I don't quite understand there are two declared unsigned vectors.

CONSTANT ZERO : UNSIGNED(3 DOWNTO 0) := (OTHERS=>'0); 
SIGNAL count : UNSIGNED(3 DOWNTO 0) := ZERO;

Then follows:

IF clk'EVENT AND clk='1' THEN
    if count<(2-1) THEN
         output<='1';
         etc...

What I have problems with is part

if count<(2-1)

What could this 2-1 mean? I have several ideas. From googling I found out that vector_name(n-1 downto 0) is a common way of declaring vectors, where n = number of bits OR width of the bus. However, this doesn't seem to have anything in common with the example. Another guess: the value on the left is an unsigned binary signal, so maybe 2-n means that n before comparison should be turned into a binary?

P.S. This example is from a frequency divider.

share|improve this question
    
Which library declares UNSIGNED? I'm asking because I don't know if the non-standard ones provide an odd subset of what it should. Using numeric_std I can't see any good reason for not saying if count < 1. Unless it's a way of semi-documenting a kludgy fix for an unexpected off-by-one problem with the intended if count < 2, e.g. if the comparison was moved a cycle earlier to help the pipeline... –  Brian Drummond Dec 15 '12 at 13:40
    
Here are all the libraries used: library IEEE; use IEEE.STD_LOGIC_1164.ALL; use IEEE.NUMERIC_STD.ALL; –  petajamaja Dec 15 '12 at 13:43
    
Sorry, Mr. Drummond, could you please explain what off-by-one problem means? –  petajamaja Dec 15 '12 at 13:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using numeric_std I can't see any good reason for not saying if count < 1.

Perhaps it's a way of semi-documenting a kludgy fix for an unexpected off-by-one problem with the intended if count < 2, e.g. if the comparison was moved a cycle earlier to help the pipeline?

An "off-by-one" problem is also known as a fencepost problem, perhaps where the requirements were confusing. But it can also happen in a pipelined design where changes are made to the pipeline. When one stage in a pipeline is too slow, you must break off part of that stage and perform it a cycle earlier or later - without changing the final result. So if you needed to do something "when count = 2", but move it a cycle earlier, you may now need to adjust the value you are comparing "count" against.

This is not a definitive answer, you would need to consider it in the context of your actual code.

With regard to why there are two "unsigned" declarations : the first is just a named constant, which is good practice. It makes for less typing in a large design, as well as easier understanding and easier maintenance.

Even better would be:

subtype Digit is UNSIGNED(3 DOWNTO 0);
CONSTANT ZERO : Digit := (OTHERS=>'0'); 

SIGNAL count : Digit := ZERO;

and so on... then move Digit and Zero into a package and you can re-use them in all your modules.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much indeed! By the way, I have found an answer. It was just a divider based on MODULO counter. How simple and what a shame I didn't understand it earlier. –  petajamaja Dec 15 '12 at 14:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.