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I am using the below code to check the day of the month but it is not working. Please help me on this

  function daysInMonth(month, year) {
     var length =  new Date(year, month, 0).getDate();
     for(var i = 1; i < = length; i++)
     {
         console.log(new Date(year,month,i).getDay());
     }
  };

here is the fiddle. It returns me incorrect results..

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Why do you think that it's incorrect? –  karaxuna Dec 15 '12 at 13:13
    
.getDay() is day of week. use .getDate() or just i (day of month) again in the loop. –  Paul S. Dec 15 '12 at 13:13
    
I have tested it with 2012, 12. Starting and ending index dates are wrong according to the calender.. And as everyone knows that day index starts from 0. –  Exception Dec 15 '12 at 13:14
    
@PaulS. Logging i returns the day count. But I just wanted to know what day that i is in that year and month –  Exception Dec 15 '12 at 13:15
    
Oh, then you solved your own problem; index starts from 0 applies to months too (your demo is currently Jan 2013). –  Paul S. Dec 15 '12 at 13:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's the correct code:

function daysInMonth( month, year ) {
    var day;
    for( var i = 1 ; i <= new Date( year, month, 0 ).getDate() ; i++ ) {
        day = new Date( year, month-1, i );
        console.log( day, day.getDay() );
    }

};

daysInMonth( 12, 2012 );

The issue was due to the fact that months are indexed 0-11. Provided that first day of the week is Sunday:

daysInMonth( 12, 2012 );

Sat Dec 01 2012 00:00:00 GMT+0100 (CET) 6 //Sat
Sun Dec 02 2012 00:00:00 GMT+0100 (CET) 0 //Sun
Mon Dec 03 2012 00:00:00 GMT+0100 (CET) 1 //Mon
    ...
Mon Dec 31 2012 00:00:00 GMT+0100 (CET) 1 //Mon

Alternative, shorter code:

function daysInMonth( month, year ) {
    for( var i = new Date( year, month, 0 ).getDate(), d = new Date( year, month-1, 1 ).getDay() ; i-- ; )
        console.log( d++ % 7 );
};
share|improve this answer
    
Works as expected. Thanks. May I know does it work if we pass year 0000 or 0001,0002 or 9999 ? –  Exception Dec 15 '12 at 13:51
    
Date should be able to take up to 100,000,000 days on either side of January 1st 1970 UTC without trouble, i.e. 271702 BCE to 275642 CE . The prefixing of 0s can produce unexpected behaviour though as literals of the form 0+[0-7]+ mean you're writing in octal, not decimal. –  Paul S. Dec 15 '12 at 14:01

The Date constructor takes param month as an integer between 0 and 11, so your fiddle, which uses daysInMonth(12,2012);​ is actually finding the days of the week in daysInMonth(0,2013);​, i.e. January 2013 not December 2012.

Here is some code that will make it work letting you use months as 1 to 12

function daysInMonth(month, year) {
    var i, length =  new Date(year, month, 0).getDate(); // get last day no. of previous month ( month 0 - 11 )
    month = month - 1; // set month int to what we want
    for (i = 1; i <= length; i++) {
        console.log(new Date(year,month,i).getDay()); // continue as before
    }
};

daysInMonth(12,2012);
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alert(new Date(year, month, 0)) ??? –  A.V Dec 15 '12 at 13:23
    
No Paul S, It gives the the exact result. Here the thing is it takes month count from 1 - 12. Try to pass Feb and 2003. You will get the exact result. According to your comment it should return 29. But it returns 28. –  Exception Dec 15 '12 at 13:25
    
@A.V Date(year, month, 0) => 0 less than one, subtract 1 day, => last day of previous month –  Paul S. Dec 15 '12 at 13:25
    
@SoI put in working code –  Paul S. Dec 15 '12 at 13:30
    
@SoI With the code from your fiddle, if you tried to pass Feb as 2 and used 2003, you'd get the number of days in the month for February 2003 (which is 28) and then you'd do the days of the week of 1 to 28 of January 2003. –  Paul S. Dec 15 '12 at 13:40

This works:

console.log(new Date('12/15/2012').getDay());​

Paul S. was right, works like this:

console.log(new Date(2012, 11, 15));​

Appears that months start from 0, in your example:

daysInMonth(11,2012);​
share|improve this answer
    
In my example month starts from 1. So 12 is valid –  Exception Dec 15 '12 at 13:28
    
months are from 0 to 11, you are writing 12, so that's incorrect –  karaxuna Dec 15 '12 at 13:34

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