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I wrote the code to remove a particular node from list according to user choice, code works perfectly fine for a particular value but if i make several calls to it meaning if I call it 2 times continuously then one of my another function pointer_to_node(index) gives an out of bounds error which was also implemented by me to record such conditions,

Actually, why I need several calls is that I have to write a separate function to remove all the nodes. I am trying to accomplish that task using this function by using a for loop up to the size of my Circular Singly Linked list. But in that case it also returns me a NULL pointer and gives me out of bounds message (implemented by me in code). I have included both my functions down here

void remove_from_index(int index){
  Node*temptr;
  temptr = new Node;
  int tempdata;

  if (index==1)//means remove from first
  {
    temptr = firstptr;
    tempdata= temptr->data;
    firstptr = firstptr->nextptr;
    lastptr->nextptr=firstptr;
    delete(temptr);
  } else if(index==size_of_list()) //means last node
  {
    temptr = pointer_to_node(index);
    index--; //get pointer of 2nd last position
    lastptr = pointer_to_node(index);//setting 2nd last as last postion
    temptr->nextptr=NULL;
    temptr=NULL;
    lastptr->nextptr=firstptr;
    delete (temptr);
  } else  // any position of node
  {
    temptr = pointer_to_node(index);
    tempdata = temptr->data;
    index--; // to get address of back

    Node* temp2ptr;
    temp2ptr = new Node;

    temp2ptr = pointer_to_node(index);

    index = index+2;

    Node* temp3ptr;
    temp3ptr = new Node;

    temp3ptr = pointer_to_node(index);

    temp2ptr->nextptr = temp3ptr;

    temptr->nextptr=NULL;
    delete (temptr);
  }
}


Node* pointer_to_node(int index){
  Node*temptr;
  temptr = new Node;
  temptr = firstptr;

  Node*temptr2;
  temptr2 = new Node;
  temptr2 = NULL;
  int count = 1;

  while (temptr!=temptr2){
    if (count==index)
    {
      return temptr;
    }

    count++;
    temptr2=firstptr;
    temptr=temptr->nextptr;
  }

  if (index>size_of_list())
  {
    temptr=NULL;
    cout<< "Can't You think in bounds. Take your NULL Pointer ";
    return temptr;
    delete temptr;
    delete temptr2;
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
You have a lot of memory leaks, but overall the linkage must work. Can you please share the desctuctor of Node if you have declared such? – Boris Strandjev Dec 15 '12 at 13:25
    
@BorisStrandjev No i have not included the destructor,,.... How can i avoid memory leaks... actually if i dont use new how should i remove the node then ? – Asad Irfan Dec 15 '12 at 13:29
    
I will add a partial answer pointing the places you have memory leaks and how you can fix that. – Boris Strandjev Dec 15 '12 at 13:33
    
You didn't take the advice from your previous question about not randomly new'ing nodes and then throwing pointers away. – JasonD Dec 15 '12 at 13:33
    
@JasonD actually my programming teacher says me that you should add using new what shoudl i do then ???? and i have to delete pointer at end because this is what he has taught me :P – Asad Irfan Dec 15 '12 at 13:44

You have several memory leaks:

temptr->nextptr=NULL;
temptr=NULL; // BAD!! BAD!! Remove it otherwise you will not actually free
lastptr->nextptr=firstptr;
delete (temptr);

And here too (actually you have this in four places of the code):

Node* temp2ptr;
temp2ptr = new Node; // BADD!! Why do you allocate if you are going to reassign?
temp2ptr = pointer_to_node(index);

Remove the bads and you will avoid the memory leaks.

Still, this is not going to fix your problem.

Also you have operations after return here:

return temptr;
delete temptr;
delete temptr2;

These are never going to be executed.

EDIT Your pointer_to_node function is too complex please change it with

Node* pointer_to_node(int index) {
    Node* tempPtr = firstptr;
    for (int i = 0; i < index; i++) {
         tempPtr = tempPtr->nextptr;
    }
    return tempPtr;
}

And see if this will fix your problem. More lines of code very rarely means better programming skills, do not artificially try to increase their count.

share|improve this answer

I think another possible issue here, aside from all the memory leaks and style issues which are already well documented, is that your code does not seem to handle the case of there only being one thing in the list.

If that happens, it will delete that node, but leave firstptr and lastptr pointing at random memory.

If your size_of_list() function is just counting nodes in the list, it will probably still think there are non-zero nodes remaining, and you might then attempt to remove or otherwise access another node.

share|improve this answer

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