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I am new to bash /mysql however I have found tons of help reading threw examples and other people's problems ...but have ran into one of my own . I am attempting to insert a row into an MySQL database table every time a file is added to a specific directory (for this i am using inotifywait ) anyways here is my bash script

#!/bin/bash

while true; do
        filename= "false"
        filename= inotifywait --format "%f" -e create /var/www/media2net/torrent
        date_field= date +"%F":"%T"
        mysql --host=localhost --user=root --password=admin Media2net << EOF
        insert into video (title, description, url_video, upload_date)
                values('testing','default_description','$filename', '$date_feild');
        EOF
        echo $filename
done

From this I have verified with echo the variable $filename is properly held at end of bash script however when i look at entry in the table the column url_video has it's default value and not the string represented by $filename

From what i can conclude the variable $filename does not get passed through EOF i have tried as indicate here http://www.dba-oracle.com/t_access_mysql_with_bash_shell_script.htm

as well as this

Using shell script to insert data into remote MYSQL database

any help of where i can find how to pass variable into query would be greatly appreciated

share|improve this question
    
Can't have spaces around the =. This command filename= "false" temporarily sets the environment variable "filename" to the empty string and then executes the program named "false". –  glenn jackman Dec 15 '12 at 23:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your example, filename is set to the empty string (mind the spaces after the = sign!). You need

filename=$(inotifywait --format "%f" -e create /var/www/media2net/torrent)

Similarly,

date_field=$(date +"%F:%T")

and be careful, you have a typo in your mysql command (date_field and note date_feild):

mysql --host=localhost --user=root --password=admin Media2net <<EOF
insert into video (title, description, url_video, upload_date)
values('testing','default_description','$filename', '$date_field');
EOF

Now I hope that you're controlling the filenames. Imagine a filename that contains a single quote e.g., hello'howdy. You'll have a problem in your query. Worse, an evil user who puts a file named whatever','something'); evil_mysql_command; whatever, you'll have the evil command performed! One possibility is to sanitize the filename using printf thus:

printf -v filename '%q' "$(inotifywait --format "%f" -e create /var/www/media2net/torrent)"

This will at least escape the single quotes that could appear in a filename. See Gordon Davisson's comment: the printf trick will not prevent from all the possible attacks, so I really hope you absolutely control the name of the files!

All these suggestions yield the following script:

#!/bin/bash

while true; do
    printf -v filename '%q' "$(inotifywait --format "%f" -e create /var/www/media2net/torrent)"
    date_field=$(date +"%F:%T")
    mysql --host=localhost --user=root --password=admin Media2net <<EOF
    insert into video (title, description, url_video, upload_date) 
    values('testing','default_description','$filename', '$date_field');
    EOF
    echo "$filename"
done

Edit.

To answer your question in the comment:

why did the script properly echo $filename to my terminal but not send it properly to MySQL, does that have to do with string starting with a space? or something else completely?

That's because when you do something like:

whatever= command

then the variable whatever is set to the empty string, and the command command is executed (with the whatever variable set as environment variable). E.g.,

$ IFS='c' read a b c <<< "AcBcC"
$ echo "$a $b $c"
A B C
$ echo $IFS

$

In your script, the variable filename was in fact never globally set. You can check it by doing this:

$ filename= "false"
$ echo "$filename"

$

What happens is that the environment variable filename is set to empty string then the command false (which happens to exist) is launched using that environment variable and we're done.

When you do this:

filename= inotifywait --format "%f" -e create /var/www/media2net/torrent

the variable filename is set to the empty string, and then the command inotifywait ... is executed with filename as an environment variable (but inotifywait doesn't really care about it). And that's what you saw on your terminal! it was the output of this command. Then you probably saw an empty line, that was the output of

echo $filename

which was equivalent to

echo

since the variable filename expanded to an empty string.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
ahhh , thank you very much! your suggestion for filename worked!!! to satisfy my own curiosity why did the script properly echo $filename to my terminal but not send it properly to MySQL , does that have to do with string starting with a space? or something else completely? –  brendosthoughts Dec 15 '12 at 14:54
    
i had not gotten that far yet no! though i was aware of something of the nature being a problem do you know of any references on the web that detail more problems of that nature? –  brendosthoughts Dec 15 '12 at 15:04
    
Good point about SQL injection via the filename, but note that printf ... '%q' is not really sufficient if this type of attack is a possible problem. It does bash-style string quoting/escaping, while mysql has somewhat different quoting rules, and an attacker could take advantage of the difference. Defending properly against SQL injection is hard. –  Gordon Davisson Dec 15 '12 at 15:06
    
also this printf -v line , returns an illegal option in ubuntu 12.04 though documentation suggest syntax is correct? anyways i will read up on preventing SQL injection as Gordon has made clear there is multiple steps involved –  brendosthoughts Dec 15 '12 at 15:11
    
@brendanmorrison Make sure you're running bash and not sh. The -v option only works with the printf bash builtin. –  gniourf_gniourf Dec 15 '12 at 15:15

Some corrections... Try it so:

#!/bin/bash

while true; do
    filename=($(inotifywait --format "%f" -e create /var/www/media2net/torrent))
    date_field="$(date +"%F:%T")"
    mysql --host=localhost --user=root --password=admin Media2net <<- EOF
    insert into video (title, description, url_video, upload_date)
            values('testing','default_description','$filename', '$date_field');
    EOF
    echo $filename
done

where:

  • var=($(command)) would create a array variable, where first componant is first word
  • `"$(command)" would create a string with result of command
  • <<- EOF stand for remove tabulation and white space at left
share|improve this answer
    
Caution: only tabs are ignored before the "EOF", not arbitrary whitespace. From the man page "If the redirection operator is ‘<<-’, then all leading tab characters are stripped from input lines and the line containing delimiter." (emphasis mine) –  glenn jackman Dec 15 '12 at 23:15

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