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I'm creating a membership directory for an organization and I'm trying to figure out a nice way to keep everyone's details in order and updateable manner. I have 3 tables:

Person table handles the actual person

CREATE TABLE `person` (
    `personid` BIGINT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `personuuid` CHAR(32) NOT NULL,
    `first_name` VARCHAR(50) DEFAULT '',
    `middle_name` VARCHAR(50) DEFAULT '',
    `last_name` VARCHAR(50) DEFAULT '',
    `prefix` VARCHAR(32) DEFAULT '',
    `suffix` VARCHAR(32) DEFAULT '',
    `nickname` VARCHAR(50) DEFAULT '',
    `username` VARCHAR(32) ,
    `created_on` DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
    `created_by` CHAR(33) DEFAULT '000000000000000000000000000000000',
    `last_updated` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
    `last_updated_by` CHAR(33) DEFAULT '000000000000000000000000000000000'
) ENGINE=InnoDB, COMMENT='people';

Information about a person. Such as school, phone number, email, twitter name, etc. All of these values would be stored in 'value' as a json and my program will handle everything. On each update by the user a new entry is created to show the transition of changes.

CREATE TABLE `person_info` (
    `person_infoid` BIGINT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `person_infouuid` CHAR(32) NOT NULL,
    `person_info_type` INT(4) NOT NULL DEFAULT 9999,
    `value` TEXT,
    `created_on` DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
    `created_by` CHAR(33) DEFAULT '000000000000000000000000000000000',
    `last_updated` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
    `last_updated_by` CHAR(33) DEFAULT '000000000000000000000000000000000'
) ENGINE=InnoDB, COMMENT="Personal Details";

A map between person and person_info tables

CREATE TABLE `person_info_map` (
    `personuuid` CHAR(32),
    `person_infouuid` CHAR(32) ,
    `created_on` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
    `created_by` CHAR(33) DEFAULT '000000000000000000000000000000000',
    `is_active` INTEGER(1)
) ENGINE=InnoDB, COMMENT="Map between person and person info";

So given that I am creating a new entry into person_info everytime there is an update, I'm wondering if I should worry about i/o errors, tables getting to big, etc. And if so, what are possible solutions? I've never really worked with database schemas like this so I figure I should ask for help rather than get screwed in the future.

I'm sure some might ask how often the updates might occur. Truthfully I'm not expecting too much. We currently have 2k members in our directory and I don't expect us to ever have more than 10k active members at any time. I'm also thinking that we will have at most 50 different option types, but for safety and future purposes I allow up to 1000 different option types.

Considering this small piece, does anyone have any advice as to how I should proceed from here?

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3 Answers 3

  1. The person to person_info relationship seems like it should be modeled as a one-to-many relationship (i.e one person records has many person_info records). If that is true, the person_info_map can be dropped as it serves no purpose.

  2. Do not use the UUID fields to establish relationships between your tables. Use the primary keys and create foreign key constraints on them. This will enforce data integrity and improve the performance of joins when querying.

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It is a 1-many map, but since 'person' can be updated as well (same method as 'person_info' I wanted an easy way to know which personuuid matched with which person_infouuid as the ids for both would be changinge. I also don't understand how having ids instead of UUIDs would help with establishing connections. If person a has 2 records in person then how (other than uuids) am I to know those are the same person records, but with data changed? –  Aram Papazian Dec 15 '12 at 17:08

I would personally have the 2 tables merged as the view of the person at the current moment, and have another table where you write the changes (like an event store).

That will avoid you to join the 2 tables every single time you need to fetch the person.

But that's now from the application point of view. I hear already the DBA shouting in my ears :)

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So you're thinking move EVERYTHING over from person into person_info (name too and such)? Like that it would cut it into 2 tables? .. but my main concern is the size of the person_info table... don't you think that's going to explode and start having issues when it gets big? –  Aram Papazian Dec 15 '12 at 17:46
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So no one really answered the question so I'll post what I ended up doing. I don't know if it will work yet as our systems aren't active, but I think it should work.

I went ahead and kept the system we have above. I'm hoping that we won't ever hit too many rows that it will become an issue, but if we do then I plan on archiving a chunk of the 'old' data. I think that will help, but I think machines will likely our pace of usage.

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