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I want to insert some text (char array) into another char array. I used for this strcpy, but it sometimes shows (not always) strange signs, take a look:

enter image description here

how to get rid of them?

Heres my code:

    #include <string>
#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

const string currentDateTime() {
    time_t now = time(0);
    struct tm tstruct;
    char buf[80];
    tstruct = *localtime(&now);
    strftime(buf, sizeof(buf), "%X", &tstruct);
    return buf;
}

char *addLogin(char *login, char buf[])
{
    string b(buf);
    string l(login);
    string time = currentDateTime();
    string res = time;
    res += l;
    res += b;
    return const_cast<char*>(res.c_str());
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    char buf[1024];
    strcpy(buf, " some text");
    char *login = "Brian Brown";
    char *temp = addLogin(login, buf);
    strcpy(buf, temp);
    printf("%s\n", buf);
    return 0;
}

EDITED:

const string currentDateTime() {
    time_t now = time(0);
    struct tm tstruct;
    char buf[80];
    tstruct = *localtime(&now);
    strftime(buf, sizeof(buf), "%X", &tstruct);
    string b(buf);
    return b;
}

and it seems to work well for now

share|improve this question
    
In memset why &buf it should be buf only since array name will give the address – Omkant Dec 15 '12 at 14:37
    
This is C++ not C – Alter Mann Dec 15 '12 at 14:44
    
Isn't this what sprintf is for? – Hot Licks Dec 15 '12 at 14:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

From the function currentDateTime(), you return a local variable buf which is undefined behaviour. This is certainly cauing problem when you later append the strings (along with the one returned by this function).

Besides, the signature of the function is const string but you return a char*.

share|improve this answer
    
edited, it seems to work good now, thanks!:) – Brian Brown Dec 15 '12 at 14:45

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