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I have a recurring configurable task that receives a table name and a column name, then fetches rows from that table sorted by the specified column and does some processing on them. At the end it saves the last value of the order column so that when it starts again it only processes rows from that point on.

In order to save that info I have a different table that has some identifying info (table name, and a few more) and the last value of the order column as a string. In order to work with this table I did something like:

public T GetValue<T>(ProgressRecord<T> record) {
    string value = GetValueAsString(record); // this calls a sproc that fetches the value; the record fields are used as a filter
    return value != null ? (T)Convert.ChangeType(value, typeof(T)) : default(T);
}

public void SetValue<T>(ProgressRecord<T> record) {
    string value = Convert.ToString(record.value);
    InnerSetValue(record, value); // this calls a sproc that saves the value; the record fields are used as a filter
}

where ProgressRecord contains the identifying info and the value as T

I'm using default(T) since, if no value yet exists I'll use the default value for that type as the start value to filter the rows from.

This works ok for numeric types, but there are some issues with DateTime.

The first one is that Convert.ToString(DateTime) doesn't keep the millisecond info, and I need that to ensure I don't process the same rows again (if their time is 01:23:42.578, but I filter from 01:23:42.000, I'll fetch them again).

The second one is that default(DateTime) return the date Jan 1st 0001, and if I try to send that date back to fetch rows with dates larger than that, MSSQL will complain that the date is out of range, and it need to be after Jan 1st 1753.

So I changed my code to:

public T GetValue<T>(ProgressRecord<T> record) {
    string value = GetValueAsString(record); // this calls a sproc that fetches the value; the record fields are used as a filter
    if (value != null) {
        T returnVal = (T)Convert.ChangeType(value, typeof(T));
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(DateTime)) {
            returnVal = (T)Convert.ChangeType(DateTime.ParseExact(value, "yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss.fff"));
        }
        return returnVal;
    }
    T defaultVal = default(T);
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(DateTime)) {
            defaultVal = (T)Convert.ChangeType(SqlDateTime.MinValue.Value, typeof(T));
    }
    return defaultVal;
}

public void SetValue<T>(ProgressRecord<T> record) {
    string value = Convert.ToString(record.value);
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(DateTime)) {
        value = record.value.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss.fff");
    }
    InnerSetValue(record, value); // this calls a sproc that inserts/updates the value; the record fields are used as a filter
}

I find this code kind of dirty because of the IFs. Is there a simpler way to make these conversions, without resorting to type checking? Are there any System classes that I missed that would know how to do this: convert date to string with milliseconds and back, and provide a custom default (of SQLDateTime.MinValue) for nulls?

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You can put earlier dates in sql server by using float or int and making them negative, e.g. Select(Convert(DateTime,-1). Mind you I'd allow nulls, and dispense with the entire issue. –  Tony Hopkinson Dec 15 '12 at 16:02
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2 Answers 2

I see 2 ways of accomplishing your task:

  1. In the database query you use a datetime rounded to seconds. I mean if the last record of the row set you a processing has 01:23:42.578, you ignore it and process all the records up to 01:23:42.000. This means you leave it for the next processing. Then you store 01:23:42.000 as the last processed datetime value in your configuration info table. Next time you run your processing, you take all the records starting from 01:23:42.000, which will include a record with 01:23:42.578, which you should been taken on the previous run.
  2. Second solution would involve using Ticks property if the DateTime type.
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The first option would require more changes than the way I already did it, and would still require specific code for DateTime, which is what I was trying to avoid in the first place. I was hoping there was some method similar to Convert.ToString(dateTime) that allowed giving a string custom format, that I may have missed. –  Andrei Fierbinteanu Dec 17 '12 at 13:30
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The standard Convert.ToString(DateTime value) is simply calling value.ToString()

DateTime.ToString() is actually calling

DateTimeFormat.Format(this, null, DateTimeFormatInfo.CurrentInfo)

So basically if you change Culture settings with specific dtfi, in which you can set the default format with milliseconds at the end, I think you can bypass the first problem.

As for second problem, I don't know if it's possible to override in any elegant way. You can check before updating the value to database, if it's equal to DateTime.MinValue, or, not so elegant, perform the below code and hope no one ever finds out it was you who did it:

typeof(DateTime).GetField ("MinValue").SetValue (typeof(DateTime), new DateTime(1753, 1, 1));
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When you set the value of a static field, just use null as the first argument to SetValue (the System.Type object (System.RuntimeType) does not have a MinValue field). However, don't change the value of a readonly field with reflection! It will most likely break a lot of code, including code in the Base Class Library. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 16 '12 at 11:08
    
Wouldn't changing the current culture affect the entire application? –  Andrei Fierbinteanu Dec 16 '12 at 16:42
    
@AndreiFierbinteanu it would. That's why Mihail's answer seems to be best. Still, it is possible with the above, although highly not recommended, as Jeppe said. On the other hand, as for Culture settings, it is possible to change that only to perform those two methods, then change it back to what it was before. –  Nyuno Dec 16 '12 at 19:00
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