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I am writing a code to traverse through the directory using depth first algorithm. The problem is the program is not displaying anything and gives Segmentation Fault error. I tried to debug it but it was worthless as I am still learning stuff. So now I need the help of experts. Here is the code:

void func(char path[]);
int main(int argc, char *argv)
{
    char buf[255];

    scanf("%s",buf);
    func(buf);
    return 0;
}

void func(char path[])
{
    DIR *dirp;
    struct stat states;
    struct dirent *direntp;
    printf("Inside\n");
    dirp=opendir(path);
    stat(path,&states);

    while((direntp=readdir(dirp))!=NULL)
    {
        if(S_ISDIR(states.st_mode))
        {
            printf("Calling Func\n");
            func(direntp->d_name);
            chdir("..");
        }
        else
            if(!S_ISDIR(states.st_mode))
            {
                printf("  %s\n",direntp->d_name);
            }
            else
                if(!strcmp(direntp->d_name,".")||!strcmp(direntp->d_name,".."))
                {
                    continue;
                }
    }
    return ;
}
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1  
The if(!S_ISDIR) and if(S_ISDIR) parts should be exchanged (not to mention that if (cond) { } else if (!cond) is redundant as heck...) – user529758 Dec 15 '12 at 15:35
    
Also please indent properly. – alk Dec 15 '12 at 15:37
    
If a directory is passed to func(): Could it be you are missing to chdir() into this directoy? – alk Dec 15 '12 at 15:41
    
Compile your code using -Wall -g, fix it until there are no more warnings. If it segfaults use gdb to see where. – alk Dec 15 '12 at 15:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Inside func, in front of the while, put that:

dirp=opendir (path);
if (!dirp)
  return;

and, btw, its int main (int argc, char *argv[])

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry the main argument is a typo – Alfred Dec 15 '12 at 15:53
    
But still it is not displaying any files name. – Alfred Dec 15 '12 at 15:56
    
Hmm, you are examining states, which is set by stat of the path thrown into func, and is never updated inside the while. Instead you should examine direntp, which loops thru all the entries. – pbhd Dec 15 '12 at 16:00
    
I already tried to use direntp->d_type in place of states.st_mode, but still it is not displaying file names. – Alfred Dec 15 '12 at 16:05
    
if you put a printf(" %s %d\n",direntp->d_name, direntp->d_type); as first statement in your while, you see the d_type beeing 4 for dirs or 8 for files. – pbhd Dec 15 '12 at 16:09

For debugging printing, print to stderr; it is line buffered, so it appears more reliably.

Your function, in outline, is:

void func(char path[])
{
    DIR *dirp;
    struct stat states;
    struct dirent *direntp;
    printf("Inside\n");
    dirp=opendir(path);
    stat(path,&states);

    while ((direntp = readdir(dirp)) != NULL)
    {
        if (S_ISDIR(states.st_mode))
        {
            printf("Calling Func\n");
            func(direntp->d_name);
            chdir("..");
        }
        else if (!S_ISDIR(states.st_mode))
        {
            printf("  %s\n",direntp->d_name);
        }
        else if (!strcmp(direntp->d_name,".") || !strcmp(direntp->d_name,".."))
        {
            continue;
        }
    }
}

The chdir("..") is unwise; you've neither done a chdir() to the relevant directory nor ensured that the directory is a direct sub-directory of the current directory, which means this code is going to go haywire...if it ever gets to that bit.

You do stat(path, &states); but do not check that it worked.

You do dirp = opendir(path); but do not check that it worked.

You don't do stat() on each entry; you continually use the initial stat from path. This is probably a directory when you test, so you then call the function recursively, which will be reading ., which is a directory, and you would probably just end up running out of stack if you didn't run out of DIR pointers first.

Your tests in the loop are wrongly sequenced, even if you arranged to stat() the file — which is a non-trivial operation because the name you just read has to be appended to the path of the directory to form the correct file name. Your code is:

if (is a directory)
else if (is not a directory)
else if (name is . or ..)
else ...missing...

First, the if and the following else if covers all options, so the name test and final (non-existent) else would never be executed. You probably need the name test first (pseudo-code):

if (name is a "." or "..")
    print "Skipping";
else if (name is a directory)
{
    create "path/name" as string;
    recurse with "path/name";
}
else
    print "Skipping non-directory";

Note that this always prints something in every iteration. That's very important while you're debugging. You don't want the code to be quiet when it does something you aren't expecting.

Note that you do not call closedir(); this means you will run out of directory descriptors, getting a NULL value in dirp which crashes when you use it.

Note that the pseudo-code does not include any chdir() operations. Be very, very, very cautious about using them. Understand the use of fchdir().

Read up on ftw() and nftw(); there are notes about the complications that those functions face.

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