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I'm trying to compare two booleans :

(if (equal? #f (string->number "123b"))
      "not a number"
      "indeed a number")  

When I run this in the command line of DrRacket I get "not a number" , however , when I put that piece of code in my larger code , the function doesn't return that string ("not a number") , here's the code :

(define (testing x y z)

    (define badInput "ERROR")  

    (if (equal? #f (string->number "123b"))
          "not a number"
          "indeed a number")  

    (display x))

And from command line : (testing "123" 1 2) displays : 123

Why ?

Furthermore , how can I return a value , whenever I choose ?

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

(define (testing x)
  (if (equal? #f (string->number "123b"))
      (display "not a number")
      (display "indeed a number"))
  (display x))

You were discarding the result of the if expression. The condition was working fine, but nothing was done with the resulting string, it just went ignored. The whole procedure now is returning #<void>, because display is a side-effecting operation with no value of its own. Also, I removed the badInput variable and the y and z parameters because they were not being used at all.

To return a value from a procedure, simply put the expression with the value you want to return at the end of the procedure's body - this explains why your code wasn't working, only the last expression returns a value, although you can do side-effecting operations (for example, calling display) with any expression before and including the last one.

As a matter of fact, your code can be written in a more idiomatic by returning a value, noticing that the condition in the if now actually depends on the x parameter being passed:

(define (testing x)
  (if (not (string->number x))
      (string-append "not a number " x)
      (string-append "indeed a number " x)))

(displayln (testing "123"))
=> indeed a number 123

(displayln (testing "123b"))
=> not a number 123b

EDIT:

Regarding the last edit to your question, I believe you're looking for something like this:

(define (convert originalNumber s_oldBase s_newBase)
  (if (or (not (string->number originalNumber)) ; validate error conditions first
          (not (string->number s_oldBase))
          (not (string->number s_newBase)))
      "ERROR"     ; if one of the input values is wrong, return an error message
      (begin      ; else
        <body>))) ; put the rest of the procedure's body in here

Or this, if you prefer to use a cond:

(define (convert originalNumber s_oldBase s_newBase)
  (cond ((or (not (string->number originalNumber)) ; validate error conditions
             (not (string->number s_oldBase))
             (not (string->number s_newBase)))
         "ERROR")  ; if one of the input values is wrong, return an error message
        (else      ; else
         <body>))) ; put the rest of the procedure's body in here
share|improve this answer
    
Please see the edited post. –  ron Dec 15 '12 at 17:00
    
@ron you should've posted the real problem form the beginning, the question was out of context. See my edit, that should do the trick - in essence, you have to restructure your code to return at the appropriate points –  Óscar López Dec 15 '12 at 17:08
    
@ron tried what exactly? this question is about how to implement the validation part at the beginning of the procedure, my solution will work. The rest of your code might have errors, but that's unrelated to the current question. –  Óscar López Dec 15 '12 at 17:25

The reason for this is even though your conditional is evaluting to false, your just discarding that result.

What you've typed is equivalent to:

(define (testing x y z)

    (define badInput "ERROR")  

    "not a number"

    (display x))

Where "not a number" is just discarded.

To return it, try something like

(define (testing x y z)

    (define badInput "ERROR")  
    (cond

        ((equal? #f (string->number "123b"))
              "not a number")  

        (else (display x))))
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Please see the edited post –  ron Dec 15 '12 at 17:01

The value of a function is the value of the last expression in its body. The last expression in your testing function's body is (display x), so that's the value of your function. Since your if is not the last expression in the body and it does not have any side-effects, it basically does nothing.

If you move your if after the call to display, testing will display x and then return "not a number".

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So how can I return the value (the string of the if) ? –  ron Dec 15 '12 at 16:29
    
@ron By moving it, so that it is the last expression in the body. –  sepp2k Dec 15 '12 at 16:30
    
No way around this ? –  ron Dec 15 '12 at 16:30
    
You could use a cond to get short circuiting –  jozefg Dec 15 '12 at 16:31
    
@ron No way around what exactly? What is it you're trying to achieve? Do you want the call to display to not execute (like if you did return "Not a string" before the call to display in an imperative language)? If so, just move it in the else-clause of the if. –  sepp2k Dec 15 '12 at 16:34

This is going to be an overkill here, but you can return values directly from anywhere by calling a continuation set up by call/cc (or call-with-current-continuation):

(define (primo args ...)
   (call/cc (lambda (k) (secundo k args ...))))

(define (secundo k args ... )
  ... do your stuff and whenever you feel like it,
  ... return a value by calling
  (k value)
  ....
  .... )
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