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I have a 3D data, that are stored in 1D array. I compute the 1D indexes like this:

index = i + j * WIDTH + k * WIDTH * HEIGHT

Than I need to get original i,j,k indexes back from index. The obvious way to do this is something like this:

k = index / (WIDTH * HEIGHT) 
j = (index % (WIDTH * HEIGHT)) / WIDTH
i = index - j * WIDTH - k * WIDTH * HEIGHT

But I wonder, is there some more efficient way to do this? At least without the modulo...

Context of this question - I have a kernel in CUDA where I access the data and compute i, j, k indexes (the index corresponds to unique thread ID). So maybe there is some CUDA-specific way to do this? I guess this is quite common problem, but I couldn't find a better way to do this...

Thanks for your ideas!

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I don't think there is any way to get those values back, what you suggested yourself is definitely wrong. For instance: i=2 j=3 k=4 WIDTH=100 HEIGHT=100. This would make index = 2 + 300 + 40000 = 40302. You say k = index/(WIDTH*HIEGHT) = 40302/10000 = 4,0302. As you can see that is not the same as the original k. –  Kevin Dec 15 '12 at 16:39
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It will always work if you expect i, j, k to be an integer. –  Jaa-c Dec 15 '12 at 16:54
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What you've got is fine; if you want to avoid the modulo (since that's very expensive on gpus) you can just do with j what you've done with i: j = (index - (k*WIDTH*HEIGHT))/WIDTH. If you want it to look a little clearer, and don't need the original index, you can do k = index/(WIDTH*HEIGHT); index -= k*WIDTH*HEIGHT; j = index/WIDTH; index -= j*WIDTH; i = index. –  Jonathan Dursi Dec 15 '12 at 17:06
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I would also ignore the suggestions about rounding up to a power of 2; in this (not too bad) case it would increase memory requirements of your 3d array by 60% and memory on GPU is generally already tight; and making your arrays powers-of-two size might cause problems with bank conflicts, depending on your access patterns. –  Jonathan Dursi Dec 15 '12 at 17:39
    
@JonathanDursi: That's a great reply. I think you should add it as an answer. This situation comes up often on GPUs since the 3 dimensions that are supported directly by the hardware often is not enough, causing more dimensions to have to be packed into the existing ones. I've been cringing every time I had to use modulo for that, but didn't think there was a better way. –  Roger Dahl Dec 15 '12 at 18:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you've got is fine; if you want to avoid the modulo (since that's very expensive on gpus) you can just do with j what you've done with i:

j = (index - (k*WIDTH*HEIGHT))/WIDTH

If you want the logic to be a little clearer, and don't need the original index, you can do

k = index/(WIDTH*HEIGHT); 
index -= k*WIDTH*HEIGHT; 

j = index/WIDTH; 
index -= j*WIDTH; 

i = index/1;

which is then pretty straightforwardly extended to arbitrary dimensions. You can try tweaking the above by doing things like precomputing WIDTH*HEIGHT, say, but I'd just turn up optimization and trust the compiler to do that for you.

The suggestions about rounding up to a power of 2 are correct in the sense that it would speed up the index calculation, but at quite some cost. In this (not too bad) case, WIDTH=HEIGHT=100, it would increase memory requirements of your 3d array by 60% (WIDTH=HEIGHT=128) and memory on GPU is generally already tight; and making your arrays powers-of-two size might well introduce problems with bank conflicts, depending on your access patterns.

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Try to round your dimensions up to the next power of two. Then you can use bit shifts and masks instead of multiplications, divisions and modulo.

index = i | (j | k << HEIGHT_BITS) << WIDTH_BITS;

k = index >> (WIDTH_BITS + HEIGHT_BITS);
j = (index >> WIDTH_BITS) & ((1 << HEIGHT_BITS) - 1);
i = index & ((1 << WIDTH_BITS) - 1);
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Only for case when dimensions are power of 2. Use bitmask. For example if 1st index max value is 4, then it should take 1st 2 bits in index.

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