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I get the footage from the camera. Like this:

Initialize:

uint pcount = (uint)(capGrabber.Width * capGrabber.Height * PixelFormats.Bgr32.BitsPerPixel / 8);
section = CreateFileMapping(new IntPtr(-1), IntPtr.Zero, 0x04, 0, pcount, null);
map = MapViewOfFile(section, 0xF001F, 0, 0, pcount);
BitmapSource = System.Windows.Interop.Imaging.CreateBitmapSourceFromMemorySection(section, capGrabber.Width, capGrabber.Height, PixelFormats.Bgr32, capGrabber.Width * PixelFormats.Bgr32.BitsPerPixel / 8, 0) as InteropBitmap;
capGrabber.Map = map;

where

IntPtr map;
IntPtr section;
InteropBitmap BitmapSource;

Graber (capGrabber):

public int BufferCB(double sampleTime, IntPtr pBuffer, int bufferLen)
{
    if (Map != IntPtr.Zero)
    {
        CopyMemory(Map, pBuffer, bufferLen);
        OnNewFrameArrived();
    }

    return 0;            
}

I get the image upside down (top-down). Need to fix this. I found some stuff (use structure BITMAPINFO), but I have not worked. Ask any ideas.

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3 Answers 3

The problem seems to be related to Top-Down vs. Bottom-Up DIBs.

Some people add WPF transformations to rotate the bitmap by 180 deg, but the simplest solution I found is to copy the bitmap in a reverse order, i.e. to replace

CopyMemory(Map, pBuffer, bufferLen);

by

for(IntPtr pMap = Map, pBuf = pBuffer+bufferLen; pBuf.ToInt64() > pBuffer.ToInt64(); pMap += 4, pBuf -= 4)
    CopyMemory(pMap, pBuf-4, 4);

Note the number 4 means the number of bytes representing one pixel, i.e. 32 bits (RGB32) divided by 8.

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Note that you can't just reverse the order because this will flip the left and right. You instead have to reverse based on the stride. IE int stride = Width * PixelFormats.Bgr32.BitsPerPixel / 8; for (IntPtr pMap = Map, pBuf = buffer + bufferLen; pBuf.ToInt64() > buffer.ToInt64(); pMap += stride, pBuf -= stride) CopyMemory(pMap, pBuf - stride, stride); –  Tom Nov 7 at 19:33
var target = m_Map;
var bytesPerRow = (m_Width * 4);
var source = aBuffer + aLength - bytesPerRow;

for (int i = m_Height - 1; i > 0; i--)
{
    Interop.CopyMemory(target, source, bytesPerRow);
    target += bytesPerRow;
    source -= bytesPerRow;
}

Much more performant. Original code takes 224 467 428 ticks per iteration. Per row copying takes only 4 041 288 ticks

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Petr Gotthard has the correct issue in mind, but the code doesn't solve the issue.

According to MSDN:

In a bottom-up DIB, the image buffer starts with the bottom row of pixels, followed by the next row up, and so forth. The top row of the image is the last row in the buffer. Therefore, the first byte in memory is the bottom-left pixel of the image. In GDI, all DIBs are bottom-up. The following diagram shows the physical layout of a bottom-up DIB.

What this means is that your image is drawing the bottom row first, not the top one. This creates a vertical mirror effect. It does NOT reverse the left and right, however.

Consider the following array:

[ 0, 1, 2 ]
[ 3, 4, 5 ]
[ 6, 7, 8 ]

Top down would read and output as it is stated. But a bottom up would parse it in this manner:

[ 6, 7, 8 ]
[ 3, 4, 5 ]
[ 0, 1, 2 ]

If we simply reverse it, we get this:

[ 2, 1, 0 ]
[ 5, 4, 3 ]
[ 8, 7, 6 ]

So to put it back, we need the stride (width), then we reverse line by line.

So taking Petr's answer and adding a stride, we get this:

int stride = Width * PixelFormats.Bgr32.BitsPerPixel / 8;
for (IntPtr pMap = Map, pBuf = buffer + bufferLen; pBuf.ToInt64() > buffer.ToInt64(); pMap += stride, pBuf -= stride)
    CopyMemory(pMap, pBuf - stride, stride);
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