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I have a subclass SubClass that inherits from baseclass BaseClass.

BaseClass has an initializer, like so:

-(id)init {
    self = [super init];
    if(self) {
       [self commonInit];
    }
  return self;
 }

 -(void)commonInit {
     self.goodStuff = [[NSMutableArray alloc]init];
 }

SubClass does its initializer, like so:

-(id)init {
    self = [super init];
    if(self) {
       [self commonInit];
    }
  return self;
 }

 -(void)commonInit {
     self.extraGoodStuff = [[NSMutableArray alloc]init];
 }

Now, I've *never taken a proper Objective-C course, but I'm a programmer more from the Electrical Engineering side, so I make do. I've developed server-side applications mostly in Java though, so I may be seeing the OO world through Java principles.

When SubClass is initialized, it calls the BaseClass init and my expectation would be — because inheritance to me implies that characteristics of a BaseClass pass through to SubClass — that the commonInit method in BaseClass would be called during BaseClass init.

It is not. I can *sorta understand maybe-possibly-stretch-my-imagination why it wouldn't be. But, then — why wouldn't it be based on the principles of OOP? What does "self" represent if not the instance of the class of the running code?

Okay, so — I'm not going to argue that what a well-developed edition of Objective-C is doing is wrong. So, then — what is the pattern I should be using in this case? I want SubClass to have two main bits — the goodStuff that BaseClass has as well as the extraGoodStuff that it deserves as well.

Clearly, I've been using the wrong pattern in this type of situation. Am I meant to expose commonInit (which makes me wonder about encapsulation principles — why expose something that, in the Java world at least, would be considered "protected" and something that should only ever be called once for each instance)?

I've run into a similar problem in the recent past and tried to muddle through it, but now — I'm really wondering if I've got my principles and concepts all straight in my head.

Little help, please.


Let me clarify — I get that self ends up being SubClass when I call init on super. That I can see when I debug, etc.

What's the pattern for overriding methods in this sort of situation? Where I have a bit of common initialization that may get called from several init methods in the super class? Do I have to put the code in every variation of init?

share|improve this question
1  
Your subclass's commonInit method needs to call the superclass method, then. – Carl Norum Dec 15 '12 at 17:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

self in BaseClass' constructor in your example is of type SubClass, so [self commonInit] calls SubClass' commonInit override , not BaseClass' commonInit method.

share|improve this answer
    
Right. That bit I totally get. What's the preferred pattern then? Do you put all "commonInit" type stuff in init? Meaning that every mutation of init you might have, duplicates a whole bunch of code? So, for example, if I have -initWithAParam: do I take all that commonInit code and put it in there, too? See what I mean? – bleeckerj Dec 15 '12 at 17:12
    
@bleeckerj If you don't want to override commonInit, just call it for example commonBaseClassInit() in your base class and commonSubClassInit in your subclass and it won't be overridden in your subclass. Is there a particular reason to call them the same thing and not anything more descriptive? Is it called from outside the class too? – Joachim Isaksson Dec 15 '12 at 17:15
    
Okay, fair enough. I guess I've gotten into the habit of using this pattern. I suppose it's just a new idiom I'll have to get used to. – bleeckerj Dec 15 '12 at 17:18
1  
@bleeckerj - In this case Objective-C is working exactly the same way Java would, your subclass commonInit overrides your base class one as (in Java-ese) "[the base class commonInit] is public, protected or declared with default access in the same package as [your subclass]". In some languages this is not always the case, e.g. in C++ a method has to be virtual for such overriding to occur. – CRD Dec 15 '12 at 18:38
    
I think this is a disadvantage of objective-c. It doesn't have access control for methods exactly. – AntiMoron Dec 2 '15 at 3:23

self and super are just a pointers to a memory location, they point to the same address where your object are allocated, but they are treated special by the Objective-C compiler:

super starts overload resolution at the first super type, ie. the parent type (BaseClass in this case).

self starts overload resolution at the current runtime type that the pointer points to. That is why you cannot call BaseClass commonInit from BaseClass, since self points to a SubClass. If you want to do this, you should have the commonInit in SubClass call [super commonInit].

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for fixing this specific problem using [super commonInit]. – paulmelnikow Dec 15 '12 at 22:03
    
I don't think of it as useful to think of self and super as different addresses. – Grady Player Dec 16 '12 at 4:41
    
commonInit is just a helper function and SHOULD NOT be exposed in header file in order to avoid the situation that users may call commonInit by themselves. So it is not that possible to make the [super commonInit]; call anymore. – AntiMoron Dec 2 '15 at 3:19

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