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I'm just wondering whether this code that a fellow developer (who has since left) is OK, I think he wanted to avoid putting a lock. Is there a performance difference between this and just using a straight forward lock?

    private long m_LayoutSuspended = 0;
    public void SuspendLayout()
    {
        Interlocked.Exchange(ref m_LayoutSuspended, 1);
    }

    public void ResumeLayout()
    {
        Interlocked.Exchange(ref m_LayoutSuspended, 0);
    }

    public bool IsLayoutSuspended
    {
        get { return Interlocked.Read(ref m_LayoutSuspended) != 1; }
    }

I was thinking that something like that would be easier with a lock? It will indeed be used by multiple threads, hence why the use of locking/interlocked was decided.

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2 Answers 2

Yes what you are doing is safe from a race point of view reaching the m_LayoutSuspended field, however, a lock is required for the following reason if the code does the following:

if (!o.IsLayoutSuspended)  // This is not thread Safe .....
{
  o.SuspendLayout();   // This is not thread Safe, because there's a difference between the checck and the actual write of the variable a race might occur.
  ...
  o.ResumeLayout();
}

A safer way, that uses compare exchange to make sure no race conditions have occurred:

private long m_LayoutSuspended = 0;
public bool SuspendLayout()
{
    return Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref m_LayoutSuspended, 1) == 0;
}

if (o.SuspendLayout()) 
{
  ....
  o.ResumeLayout();
}

Or better yet simply use a lock.

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Personally I'd use a volatile Boolean:

private volatile bool m_LayoutSuspended = false;
public void SuspendLayout()
{
    m_LayoutSuspended = true;
}

public void ResumeLayout()
{
    m_LayoutSuspended = false;
}

public bool IsLayoutSuspended
{
    get { return m_LayoutSuspended; }
}

Then again, as I've recently acknowledged elsewhere, volatile doesn't mean quite what I thought it did. I suspect this is okay though :)

Even if you stick with Interlocked, I'd change it to an int... there's no need to make 32 bit systems potentially struggle to make a 64 bit write atomic when they can do it easily with 32 bits...

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@Jon: I'm curious, can you elaborate on "volatile doesn't mean quite what I thought it did"? –  LukeH Sep 7 '09 at 13:35
    
@Luke: I'm planning on elaborating on it in detail in a blog post at some point, but bluebytesoftware.com/blog/2008/06/13/… is most of it. –  Jon Skeet Sep 7 '09 at 13:40
    
Just to emphasize, a volatile long would not be safe (on a 32 bits system). –  Henk Holterman Sep 7 '09 at 13:49
2  
volatile is only useful when a set of thread exclusively write to a field and a set of threads exclusively read a field, other than that it isn't of much use. –  Pop Catalin Sep 7 '09 at 13:58
2  
@Downvoter: Care to comment? –  Jon Skeet Jan 26 '11 at 14:15

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