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this is my first question, Hope i will get my answer soon...

I want code that repeat function continuously... I have tried some code but they wont work... Tried codes are:

<script type="text/javascript">
$(function() 
{
$('#more').load('exp1.php'); // SERIOUSLY!
});
</script>

I want to repeat this function After Some interval. I have tried

setInterval()

and

setTimeout()

But i wont get result...

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1  
What was your code when you tried both set...? –  bobthyasian Dec 15 '12 at 18:16
    
You should not continuously fire ajax requests. If you want live updates, use server push technologies. –  Bergi Dec 15 '12 at 18:53
    
@Bergi if you want to support more browsers continuous poll is the only choice. comets and push notifications aren't supported widely yet... –  Dany Khalife Jul 10 '13 at 14:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This will repeat the task until you clear the interval (with clearTimeout(repater))

var repeater;

function doWork() {
 $('#more').load('exp1.php');
 repeater = setTimeout(doWork, 1000);
}

doWork();

Per OP's original condition:

I want code that repeat function continuously...

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2  
This will trigger not just one repeating cycle, but many (indefinitely). –  Sirko Dec 15 '12 at 18:11
    
Yes, just like OP requested. Read his description again. –  Hristo Yankov Dec 15 '12 at 18:12
    
@HristoYankov You might want to consider changing setInterval to setTimeout –  brenjt Dec 15 '12 at 18:14
    
@brenjt, of course, you are correct, thanks –  Hristo Yankov Dec 15 '12 at 18:15
1  
The setTimeout needs to be provided in a callback function if you really want to have a consistent interval. –  Christoph Dec 15 '12 at 18:39

For an Ajax-request I would use a timeout instead of an interval, and start the timeout again in the callback of the ajax-request.

If you use an interval of say 1 second and your server takes more than one second to respond, you will start to stack calls with an interval, since the interval will call the function every second no matter what. With the timeout-in-callback approach instead, you wouldn't start the countdown until previous request has completed.

I'm using an IIFE to trigger the first call to the function. Then when the load has completed, I use a timeout to call the function again after one second:

(function loadContent(){
    $('#more').load('exp1.php', function () {
       setTimeout(loadContent, 1000);
    });   
})();
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Thanx Christofer Eliasson –  Sarvesh Godbole Dec 21 '12 at 5:58

Just throwing it out there:

function doRequest() {
$.ajax({
  url: 'exp1.php',
  timeout: 1000,
  success: function(data) {
    $('#more').html(data);
    doRequest();
  }
});
}
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you can do this like

var myFunction = function() {
    $('#more').load('bla.php'); 
};

var timer =  setInterval(myFunction, 1000); // call every 1000 milliseconds

or

var timer = setTimeout(myFunction, 1000); // call every 1000 milliseconds

clearTimeout(timer); //To stop the function from being called forever

as @Christofer Eliasson For an Ajax-request, you would probably want to use a timeout instead of an interval, an start the timeout again in the callback, to make sure that you don't stack calls if the server is taking more than 1 second to respond

Good Read

  1. MDN:window.setTimeout
  2. MDN:window.setInterval
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2  
For an Ajax-request, you would probably want to use a timeout instead of an interval, an start the timeout again in the callback, to make sure that you don't stack calls if the server is taking more than 1 second to respond. –  Christofer Eliasson Dec 15 '12 at 18:10
    
@ChristoferEliasson thankyou for point out –  obi NullPoiиteя kenobi Dec 15 '12 at 18:12

How about some good ol' fashion recursion?

function getStuff() {
    $('#more').load('exp1.php', function() {
        getStuff();
    });
}

getStuff();​

Demo:
http://jsfiddle.net/Zn2rh/1/

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1  
There is no timeout, it will fire indefinitely with NO pause! setTimeout is a better choice. –  machineaddict Jul 25 '13 at 12:36

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