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In Qt Creator, I have a couple of widgets declared like so:

Header File:

    class MapViewer : public QGraphicsView
{
    Q_OBJECT

public:
    explicit MapViewer(QGraphicsScene *scene, QWidget *parent = 0);
    ~MapViewer();

public slots:
    void mousePressEvent(QMouseEvent *event);

};

// Declaration for the map editor window.
class MapEditor : public QMainWindow
{
    Q_OBJECT

public:
    explicit MapEditor(QWidget *parent = 0);
    ~MapEditor();

public:
    QLayout *editorLayout;
    QPushButton *btn;
    QGraphicsScene *mapScene;
    MapViewer *mapView;

private:
    Ui::MapEditor *ui;
};

CPP File:

  MapEditor::MapEditor(QWidget *parent) :
    QMainWindow(parent),
    ui(new Ui::MapEditor)
{

    ui->setupUi(this);
    this->setWindowTitle("2DXY :: Map Editor");
    this->setGeometry(10,10,1170,750);
    editorLayout = new QVBoxLayout; // Create a new layout
    this->setLayout(editorLayout); // Set the widget's layout to our newly created layout.

    mapScene = new QGraphicsScene(); // Create a new graphics scene to draw upon.

    mapView = new MapViewer(mapScene,this); // Create a new graphics view to display our scene - set its parent to 'this' so that it doesn't open in a new window.
    mapView->setHorizontalScrollBarPolicy(Qt::ScrollBarAlwaysOff);
    mapView->setVerticalScrollBarPolicy(Qt::ScrollBarAlwaysOff);
    mapView->setGeometry(20,20,1178,546); // Width first, then height.

AND:

void MapViewer::mousePressEvent(QMouseEvent *event)
{
    // Show an empty message box, just to check that the event handler works!
    QMessageBox *notification = new QMessageBox();
    notification->show();
    notification->exec();
    // Some how access the same QGraphicsScene and View (mapScene, mapView) as above, so
    // I can update their contents on the open form / window.

}

And as you can see, I wish to access the Graphics Scene again to update it, then redraw it (or whatever). But I'm not able to access the graphics scene at all, despite a few hours of trial and error with declaring widgets in different ways.

I know that the listener itself works, because if it's set to open a new message box, or output to the debug window, then it works, it's just that I can't access the widgets I've already defined.

I feel that there is a (relatively) easy solution to this problem, and that I'm just missing something obvious.

share|improve this question
    
Just make them member variables of the class and provide getter methods... –  cmannett85 Dec 15 '12 at 18:21
    
@cmannett85 - Could you explain this in more detail / provide an example? (I'm quite new to C++!) Thanks! –  BnMcG Dec 15 '12 at 19:39
    
Bret Kuhns did a good job of that. However I must stress that this is not the way to learn C++! Qt uses some unusual/unavailable paradigms compared to 'normal' C++, so learn the language first and then the framework. –  cmannett85 Dec 16 '12 at 9:30
    
Thanks - I've learnt some more about the structure that C++ uses, and I think I've made my code 'cleaner', however, using Bret's code I've only been able to access the widget is by making a new instance of it, whereas I want to update an existing instance of the widget. Is there a way to do this? –  BnMcG Dec 16 '12 at 9:39
    
Do want MapEditor to only contain one QGraphicsScene? So the same QGraphicsScene is passed into a newly built MapRender each time MapEditor::addWidget() is called? –  cmannett85 Dec 16 '12 at 10:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
void MapViewer::mousePressEvent(QMouseEvent *event)
{
    // Show an empty message box, just to check that the event handler works!
    QMessageBox *notification = new QMessageBox();
    notification->show();
    notification->exec();

    //  To add something whenever the user clicks, you don't need the view,
    //  just the scene.
    scene()->addItem( new MyItem() );
}

Remember MapViewer derives from QGraphicsView and the view must know about the scene it belongs to - so it has a scene() method to return it, which you inherited.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I see! That works great! Thanks a lot for your patience and understanding! –  BnMcG Dec 16 '12 at 12:26

You passed the QGraphicsScene to your MapRender object's constructor. What do you do with the scene within its constructor? Ideally, you should be storing it as a data member of MapRender. For example:

class MapRender {
public:
    MapRender(QGraphicsScene* scene)
      : scene_(scene)
    {
    }

public slots:
    void mousePressEvent(QMouseEvent *event);

private:
    QGraphicsScene* scene_;
}

Now in your implementation of mousePressEvent, you can access to the scene member:

void MapRender::mousePressEvent(QMouseEvent *event) {
    int CursorX = event->globalX();
    int CursorY = event->globalY();

    QGraphicsRectItem *clickedBox = new QGraphicsRectItem(40,40,32,32);
    clickedBox->setBrush(QBrush(Qt::blue));

    scene_->addItem(clickedBox);
}

Keep in mind you should ideally be putting the implementation of the constructor in your cpp file, but my example does it in the declaration for brevity.

share|improve this answer
    
I can now access the QGraphicsScene fine from the mousePressEvent handler, however how would I access it from the MapEditor::addWidget() method, for example, to draw on it? scene_->addLine(...); Thanks, Ben. –  BnMcG Dec 15 '12 at 18:38
    
Well, you constructed the scene in MapEditor::addWidget() so you can access it normally with scene->addLine(...); (after you new it in your example). Passing a pointer to an object to a function/constructor does not invalidate the pointer within your current scope. –  Bret Kuhns Dec 15 '12 at 20:21

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