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I am trying to write a function that takes in a predicate and a list and returns a list that satisfies the predicate.

So, for instance, I want something like this:

haskell> count_if (x > 3) [2,3,4,5,6] 
[4,5,6]

Here's what I have so far:

count_if f [] = 0 
count_if f (x:xs) 
  | f x = x : count_if f xs
  | otherwise = count_if f xs 

My question is, how do I test this function using a predicate?

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What is your question again? –  manojlds Dec 15 '12 at 18:57
    
How do i test this code? Can you please give me a test case in haskell? –  Stranger Dec 15 '12 at 18:58
    
quickcheck????? –  jk. Dec 15 '12 at 23:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your countif function is struggling to count anything because you told it to make a list:

count_if f [] = 0  -- fine, makes sense
count_if f (x:xs) 
  | f x = x : count_if f xs  -- Oops, no!
  | otherwise = count_if f xs  -- yup

Notice that 1:[2,3] = [1,2,3], so : is for putting an extra element on the front of a list. If you want to count, you want a number, not a list. (Putting x on the front sounds a lot like filter, which gives you all the elements where your predicate is true, but you wanted to count, which is different.)

You'll spot this type of error more easily if you tell the compiler what you were expecting by giving an explicit type signature like count_if :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> Int. Instead of putting x on the front with x:, let's add one with 1+, giving

count_if :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> Int
count_if f [] = 0 
count_if f (x:xs) 
  | f x = 1 + count_if f xs  -- adds one to the total from the rest
  | otherwise = count_if f xs  

Now that can be tested like this:

> count_if (>5) [1..10]
5
> count_if (=='e') "Time is of the essence"
5
> count_if even [1..100]
50

Now you can make count_if using filter. The type of filter is filter :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] and it gives just the elements that you need:

> filter (>5) [1..10]
[6,7,8,9,10]
> filter (=='e') "Time is of the essence"
"eeeee"

but then do length on the result:

countif' :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> Int
countif' f xs = length (filter f xs)

But that can be written slightly neater as

countif :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> Int
countif f = length . filter f 

because . is function composition - this says filter with f, then take the length.

(Pointfree geeks would prefer to write this as countif = (length.).filter but that's a lesson for another day!)

Using standard functions like filter and length can result in performance enhancements you might not spot by yourself. If you test countif (>0) [1..1000000] against count_if (>0) [1..1000000], you'll find it runs noticably faster. It's a good idea to get to know prelude functions like filter, foldr, scanr etc from the prelude because of this.

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@AdrewC, thanks for the awesome explanation. –  Stranger Dec 18 '12 at 17:27
1  
Actually, this pointfree geek prefers countif = result length . filter, where result = (.), a "semantic editor combinator" –  luqui Dec 18 '12 at 20:26
    
@luqui An excellent opportunity to link to Conal Elliott's utterly brilliant semantic editor combinators, thanks. –  AndrewC Dec 19 '12 at 0:50

There is a function filter for this purpose. Anyway, to test count_if or filter, you can do something like

filter (>3) [2,3,4,5,6]
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There are several ways you can write a predicate. There are some built-in functions that are predicates, for example:

even :: Integer -> Bool
odd  :: Integer -> Bool
null :: [a] -> Bool

You can use an operator section with a comparison operator:

(== 0) :: Integer -> Bool
(3 >)  :: Integer -> Bool

Or you can write more complex predicates by using a lambda expression:

(\x -> 1 < x && x < 5) :: Integer -> Bool

So for example, you should have:

count_if even [1,2,3,4,5,6]                   -->  [2,4,6]
count_if (3 >) [1,2,3,4,5,6]                  -->  [1,2]
count_if (\x -> 1 < x && x < 5) [1,2,3,4,5,6] -->  [2,3,4]
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+1 clear, helpful answer to question –  AndrewC Dec 19 '12 at 2:22

There's an existing function for that called filter

see: http://hackage.haskell.org/packages/archive/base/latest/doc/html/Prelude.html#v:filter

Edit:

So the problem is your implementation is almost correct:

count_if f [] = 0 

needs to be

count_if :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]
count_if f [] = []
count_if f (x:xs) 
| f x = x:count_if f xs
| otherwise = count_if f xs 

It helps if you specify the type of your function, then the compiler will help you

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I know that there is a builtin funciton, I just want to write the implementation of it. I tried you test case and it gives me this error:Error occurred ERROR line 2 - Cannot justify constraints in explicitly typed binding *** Expression : main *** Type : IO () *** Given context : () *** Constraints : (Num [a], Ord a, Num a) –  Stranger Dec 15 '12 at 19:00
1  
That's because you return 0 in the first line, so you force the type of list be Num a => [a], change count_if f [] = 0 to count_if f [] = [] –  Xeli Dec 15 '12 at 19:05
    
Works man, Thanks. –  Stranger Dec 15 '12 at 19:06
    
@user1462452 No problems, please accept an answer if you're satisfied with it ;) –  Xeli Dec 16 '12 at 13:38

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