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I've tried following code in ie, firefox and node.js

var x = 10;
var o = { x: 15 };
function f(){
     console.log(this.x);
}
f();
f.call(o);

the results in browsers are 10, 15, but the result in node.js is undefined, 15.

Please explain to me what is the different behavior of “this” keyword in browsers and node.js? I've read many pages but there wasn't any obvious answer. Thanks in advance.

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Maybe Node.js runs in strict mode, by default... (In strict mode, this, inside a function, never coerces to the global object.) –  Šime Vidas Dec 15 '12 at 20:00
2  
How are you loading this code into node.js? You would see this behavior if whatever loaded the node.js code parsed it as a function body as via new Function(javascriptSourceCode)() because then var x would declare a variable local to a function instead of being a top level global. –  Mike Samuel Dec 15 '12 at 20:01
2  
@ŠimeVidas, in that case you would get an exception dereferencing null, not undefined for this.x. –  Mike Samuel Dec 15 '12 at 20:02
    
@MikeSamuel Yes, my mistake. –  Šime Vidas Dec 15 '12 at 20:02
    
@MikeSamuel, i copied the code into a file test.js and ran that file –  Cong Nguyen Dec 15 '12 at 20:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Javascript files loaded in Nodejs are automatically wrapped in anonymous functions.

So in Node what you are really running is:

(function(/* There are args here, but they aren't important for this answer */){
  var x = 10;
  var o = { x: 15 };
  function f(){
    console.log(this.x);
  }
  f();
  f.call(o);
})();

The browser does not do this. The issue is that now in Node x is just a normal variable in the scope of the function, it is not part of the global scope. When you call f() this way, this within f is the global scope.

If directly put x on the global scope, it will work in both cases.

this.x = 10;

That will place x on the window global object in the browser, and the global global object in Node.

Generally, you do not load things globally in Node, instead you group your code into modules, as described here. There is info about the various global things you can access here. And if you are curious about the wrapper, you can see it here.

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Thank you very much. Could you please give me any nodejs documentation about that? –  Cong Nguyen Dec 15 '12 at 20:28
1  
@CongNguyen Added a bit at the end. –  loganfsmyth Dec 15 '12 at 21:06

When calling a regular function as in f(), the behavior is different in strict mode vs. regular mode. In regular mode, this will be the global object (e.g. window). In strict mode, this will be undefined.

Other than that difference, the assignment of this in a function call is fully specified in the javascript standard so if you are seeing differences in different situations, then it is probably because of strict mode. Add strict mode to both environments and you should see consistent behavior.

You can read the section "Securing Javascript" at this MDN reference for more info.

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No, strict mode is not related to OPs issue. If this were undefined the function would throw, but it logs undefined (so this is the global object in both scenarios). –  Šime Vidas Dec 15 '12 at 20:10

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