Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have implemented a Node class which looks as follows:

template<unsigned int Size>
class Node
{
    private:
        Eigen::Matrix<float, Size, Size> m_matrix;

        Node<?> *m_previousNode;
        Node<?> *m_nextNode;
};

It has a member variable whose dimensions are set by the template argument. Also, and this is the important part, it stores pointers to the previous and next node (which can have different sizes than its own size).

Now, I have a fixed amount of nodes of this class with different sizes which I want to store in a Network class. It could be three-dimensional for the beginning:

template<unsigned int S0, unsigned int S1, unsigned int S2>
class Network
{
    private:
        Node<S0> *m_firstNode;
        Node<S1> *m_secondNode;
        Node<S2> *m_thirdNode;
};

This is the way I want to instantiate it:

Network<10, 20, 5> network;

As you can see, the number of nodes is fixed as well as each node's size; they can't be modified afterwards.

My question is how I can store pointers to the previous and next node (the Node<?> * in the code above).

I first thought about extending the template argument list like this:

template<unsigned int PreviousSize, unsigned int Size, unsigned int NextSize>
class Node
private:
    Eigen::Matrix<float, Size, Size> m_matrix;

    Node<?, PreviousSize, Size> *m_previousNode;
    Node<Size, NextSize, ?> *m_nextNode;

but then obviously, I would have to know the size of the previous node's predecessor, resulting in the same problem—I still can't fill in the ?.

Any ideas how to solve this?

share|improve this question
12  
I'm going out on a limb here and suggest that you probably don't want to do what you think you want to do. Templates are compile-time construction and don't lend themselves easily to runtime inspection. Even though you could build some tagged-union type of gadget or store void pointers, you'd still have to work with the result at runtime, which is impractical. –  Kerrek SB Dec 15 '12 at 20:05
    
What data structure is this Size parameter controlling the size of? And you're saying that size varies from node to node, it's not a constant across all the nodes in a list? –  John Kugelman Dec 15 '12 at 20:05
    
Maybe the term »linked list« was misleading. I want to set up the list with a fixed number of nodes which have a constant size each (a per-node constant, each one can have another size value). The number of nodes and their sizes are known at compile time. –  wuschelhase Dec 15 '12 at 20:18
    
@wuschelhase: This indeed sounds completely different. Could you edit your question and refine your goal, then we can all chime in. If everything is known at compile time, it certainly seems possible to use the compile time constructs. Probably with variadic templates or using cons-lists to avoid getting lost. –  Matthieu M. Dec 15 '12 at 20:23
    
@MatthieuM.: Alright, hope someone can point me in the right direction after I have updated the question. Thanks so far! –  wuschelhase Dec 15 '12 at 20:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I can see several solutions involving linked lists, but they are all, I am afraid, butt-ugly ;)

However, given that all nodes of a list belong to a common entity Network, that is, I think, our magic card. If we ditch the idea of a list, and instead aim at a "positioned" node in the network, then it becomes much easier!

template <typename Network, unsigned Index, unsigned Size>
class Node {
public:

private:
    Network* m_network;
    Eigen::Matrix<float, Size, Size> m_matrix;
}; // class Node

And the network:

template <unsigned Size0, unsigned Size1, unsigned Size2>
class Network {
public:
    template <unsigned Index>
    auto access() -> decltype(m_nodes.get<Index>()) {
        return m_nodes.get<Index>();
    }

    template <unsigned Index>
    auto get() const -> decltype(m_nodes.get<Index>()) {
        return m_nodes.get<Index>();
    }

private:
    std::tuple< Node<Network, 0u, Size0>,
                Node<Network, 1u, Size1>,
                Node<Network, 2u, Size2>> m_nodes;
};

And finally, iteration ?

template <typename Network, unsigned Index, unsigned Size>
auto Node<Network, Index, Size>::prev() -> decltype(m_network->access<Index-1>()) {
    return m_network->access<Index-1>();
}

template <typename Network, unsigned Index, unsigned Size>
auto Node<Network, Index, Size>::next() -> decltype(m_network->access<Index+1>()) {
    return m_network->access<Index+1>();
}

Well, except that we've got ourselves a little chicken and egg problem here... we can cheat our way out though by nesting the definition of Node inside the Network class. And I might do just that, however, why not just accept that iteration should always start from the network class ?

In the end, here is what I propose:

template <unsigned Size>
class Node {
public:
    // ...
private:
    Eigen::Matrix<float, Size, Size> m_matrix;
};

template <unsigned Size>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, Node<Size> const&) {
    return out << "Node<" << Size << ">";
}

template <unsigned S, unsigned... Sizes>
class Network {
private:
    // Hack for gcc, using m_nodes in decltype requires that it's already been declared
    typedef std::tuple< Node<S>, Node<Sizes>... > Nodes;
    Nodes m_nodes;

public:

    static constexpr unsigned Size() { return sizeof...(Sizes) + 1; }

    template <unsigned Index>
    auto access() -> decltype(std::get<Index>(this->m_nodes)) {
        return std::get<Index>(this->m_nodes);
    }

    template <unsigned Index>
    auto get() const -> decltype(std::get<Index>(this->m_nodes)) {
        return std::get<Index>(this->m_nodes);
    }

}; // class Network

Of course, a Node no longer knows its position, but you can wrap it up in an iterator alright:

template <typename Network, unsigned Index>
class NetworkIterator {
private:
    // Hack for gcc, using m_network in decltype requires that it's already been declared
    Network& m_network;

public:
    static_assert(Index < Network::Size(), "Index cannot exceed network size by more than one");

    NetworkIterator(Network& n): m_network(n) {}

    auto element() -> decltype(this->m_network.template access<Index>()) {
        return m_network.template access<Index>();
    }

    template <unsigned U = Index - 1>
    NetworkIterator<Network, U> prev() {
       return NetworkIterator<Network, U>(m_network);
    }

    template <unsigned U = Index + 1>
    NetworkIterator<Network, U> next() {
       return NetworkIterator<Network, U>(m_network);
    }
}; // class NetworkIterator

And yes, it works.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.