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I have two byte arrays in C# using .Net 3.0.

What is the most efficient way to compare whether the two byte arrays contains the same content for each element?

For example, byte array {0x1, 0x2} is the same as {0x1, 0x2}. But byte array {0x1, 0x2} and byte array {0x2, 0x1} are not the same.

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2  
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/43289 –  Hafthor Apr 2 '10 at 18:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Well, you could use:

public bool ByteArraysEqual(byte[] b1, byte[] b2)
{
    if (b1 == b2) return true;
    if (b1 == null || b2 == null) return false;
    if (b1.Length != b2.Length) return false;
    for (int i=0; i < b1.Length; i++)
    {
        if (b1[i] != b2[i]) return false;
    }
    return true;
}

(I normally use braces for everything, but I thought I'd experiment with this layout style just for a change...)

This has a few optimisations which SequenceEqual can't (or doesn't) perform - such as the up-front length check. Direct array access will also be a bit more efficient than using the enumerator.

Admittedly it's unlikely to make a significant difference in most cases...

You could possibly make it faster in unmanaged code by making it compare 32 or 64 bits at a time instead of 8 - but I wouldn't like to code that on the fly.

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I like your solution! –  George2 Sep 7 '09 at 14:13
    
Hey Jon, Do you work for stackoverflow ? –  Shiva Sep 8 '09 at 1:22
2  
@Shiva: Nope, I work for Google. –  Jon Skeet Sep 8 '09 at 5:19
1  
For large arrays, say 10k, would parallelizing be an efficient optimization or would the threading overhead be to too much? –  Darren Nov 27 '09 at 20:42
1  
@Lijo: I confess I've never fully understood IStructuralEquatable and when it's appropriate. –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '13 at 7:31

You can use the SequenceEqual method:

bool areEqual = firstArray.SequenceEqual(secondArray);

As mentioned in the comments, SequenceEqual requires .NET 3.5 (or LINQBridge if you're using VS2008 and targeting an earlier version of the framework).

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1  
The most efficient way I think. –  Vitaliy Ulantikov Sep 7 '09 at 14:05
1  
Not in terms of execution time it's not. –  Jon Skeet Sep 7 '09 at 14:07
1  
@Veton: It's certainly the least typing! See Jon's answer for a few additional optimisations. –  LukeH Sep 7 '09 at 14:07
7  
(Try comparing a byte array containing 1,000,000 entries with one containing 1,000,001 entries via SequenceEqual. It will go right to the end before noticing they have different lengths...) –  Jon Skeet Sep 7 '09 at 14:08
1  
This also doesn't work (without something like LINQBridge) in .NET 3.0 as required in the question... although it's possible that the OP meant .NET 3.5. –  Jon Skeet Sep 7 '09 at 14:09

Jon mentioned comparing multiple bytes at once using unsafe code, so I had to give it a go:

public unsafe bool ByteArraysEqual(byte[] b1, byte[] b2) {
   if (b1 == b2) return true;
   if (b1 == null || b2 == null) return false;
   if (b1.Length != b2.Length) return false;
   int len = b1.Length;
   fixed (byte* p1 = b1, p2 = b2) {
      int* i1 = (int*)p1;
      int* i2 = (int*)p2;
      while (len >= 4) {
         if (*i1 != *i2) return false;
         i1++;
         i2++;
         len -= 4;
      }
      byte* c1 = (byte*)i1;
      byte* c2 = (byte*)i2;
      while (len > 0) {
         if (*c1 != *c2) return false;
         c1++;
         c2++;
         len--;
      }
   }
   return true;
}

The safe code gets pretty optimised (the compiler knows that it doesn't have to check index boundaries for example), so I wouldn't expect the unsafe code to be very much faster. Any significant difference would come from the ability to compare several bytes at once.

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Good concept, although the code doesn't compile: "Cannot assign to 'p1' because it is a 'fixed variable'" –  Edward Brey Mar 16 '11 at 3:56
    
@Edward Brey: You are correct, that won't work. You need to declare new pointers inside the block to have them changeable. I have corrected the code. –  Guffa Mar 16 '11 at 5:56
    
It's faster to use longs (8 bytes) in the comp, even on 32bit machines. –  Joe Jul 28 '11 at 14:50

If you want it to be really fast, you can use unsafe code (which isn't always possible):

    public static bool ArraysEqual(byte[] b1, byte[] b2)
    {
        unsafe
        {
            if (b1.Length != b2.Length)
                return false;

            int n = b1.Length;

            fixed (byte *p1 = b1, p2 = b2)
            {
                byte *ptr1 = p1;
                byte *ptr2 = p2;

                while (n-- > 0)
                {
                    if (*ptr1++ != *ptr2++)
                        return false;
                }
            }

            return true;
        }
    }
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If you are not too concerned about performance, you can consider IStructuralEquatable.

.NET Framework Supported in: 4.5, 4

Structural equality means that two objects are equal because they have equal values. It differs from reference equality.

Example:

static bool ByteArrayCompare(byte[] a1, byte[] a2) 
{
  IStructuralEquatable eqa1 = a1;
  return eqa1.Equals(a2, StructuralComparisons.StructuralEqualityComparer);
}

REFERENCE

  1. What problem does IStructuralEquatable and IStructuralComparable solve?
  2. Why aren't IStructuralEquatable and IStructuralComparable generic?
  3. IStructuralEquatable Interface
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1  
Giving this post a point: this might be a way to do things when we are using the recent versions of the framework. –  timmi4sa Aug 14 '13 at 0:25

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