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I know the technique about UI thread updating from another thread.

So I have these two methods/techniques, which one should I use?

Using Task:

var uiTask = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
  // change something on ui thread
  var action = theActionOnUiThread;
  if (action != null) {
    action();
  }
}, CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.None, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());

Using Dispatcher:

Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.BeginInvoke(
  new Action(() => {
    // change something on ui thread
    var action = theActionOnUiThread;
    if (action != null) {
      action();
    }
  }));
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closed as not constructive by Hans Passant, valex, stusmith, mathieu, Graviton Dec 19 '12 at 3:04

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
If this is a WPF app then there is no "better", pick the one you like. –  Hans Passant Dec 15 '12 at 21:09
    
Do you want to wait for the operation to complete? How do you want to handle exceptions? –  svick Dec 15 '12 at 22:20
    
@svick i don't want to wait for this operation and handle the exceptions at the 'action' action. –  punker76 Dec 15 '12 at 22:33
2  
mh, i don't understand the downvotes... –  punker76 Dec 16 '12 at 10:06

2 Answers 2

From a technical point of view I doubt there is a 'best' here. however I'd go with the dispatcher approach:

  • it makes your intent more clear, namely that you want to get something done on the main ui thread
  • you don't need to boter with all the task factory options
  • Dispatcher makes it easier to hide everything behind an interface (1) allowing easy dependency injection and unit testing

(1) see here for example

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TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() does not guarantee returning you a TaskScheduler for the UI thread.

In fact it can sometimes return null, although these cases are rare and generally involve spinning up your own dispatcher in a native app (for example the WIX bootstrapper).

So I'd say it's safer to use the dispatcher version.

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