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I have table with a unique auto-incremental primary key. Over time, entries may be deleted from the table, so there are "holes" in this field's values. For example, table data may be as follows:

 ID  | Value    | More fields...
---------------------------------
 2   | Cat      | ... 
 3   | Fish     | ...
 6   | Dog      | ...
 7   | Aardvark | ...
 9   | Owl      | ...
 10  | Pig      | ...
 11  | Badger   | ...
 15  | Mongoose | ...
 19  | Ferret   | ...

I'm interested in a query that will return the list of missing IDs in the table. For the data above, the expected results are:

 ID 
----
 1
 4
 5
 8
 12
 13
 14
 16
 17
 18

Notes:

  1. It is assumed that the initial first ID was 1
  2. The maximum ID that should be examined is the final one, i.e. it's okay to assume that there were no additional entries after the current last one (see additional data on this point below)

A drawback of the above requirements is that the list will not return IDs that were created after ID 19 and that were deleted. I'm currently solving this case in code, because I hold the max ID created. However, if the query can take as a parameter MaxID, and also return those IDs between the current max and MaxID, that would be a nice "bonus" (but certainly not a must).

I'm currently working with MySQL, but consider moving to SQL Server, so I would like the query to fit both. Also, if you are using anything that can't run on SQLite, please mention it, thanks.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This question often comes up, and sadly, the most common (and most portable) answer is to create a temporary table to hold the IDs that should be there, and do a left join. The syntax is pretty similar between MySQL and SQL Server. The only real difference is the temporary tables syntax.

In MySQL:

declare @id int
declare @maxid int

set @id = 1
select @maxid = max(id) from tbl

create temporary table IDSeq
(
    id int
)

while @id < @maxid
begin
    insert into IDSeq values(@id)

    set @id = @id + 1
end

select 
    s.id 
from 
    idseq s 
    left join tbl t on 
        s.id = t.id 
 where t.id is null

 drop table IDSeq

In SQL Server:

declare @id int
declare @maxid int

set @id = 1
select @maxid = max(id) from tbl

create table #IDSeq
(
    id int
)

while @id < @maxid --whatever you max is
begin
    insert into #IDSeq values(@id)

    set @id = @id + 1
end

select 
    s.id 
from 
    #idseq s 
    left join tbl t on 
        s.id = t.id 
 where t.id is null

 drop table #IDSeq
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1  
Im not sure what the scenario is in this environment, but what if it were not 20, but say a thousand records? ..and this were called by code on a web page serving 50-60 users concurrently. would it be efficient to create and drop those records everytime? Considering we leave out the part where we create and drop the temp table. –  user20358 Sep 7 '09 at 17:13
1  
@daemonkid: Man, what a freaking strawman. If you had to figure this out time and time again, for 50-60 users, you'd obviously want a permanent table. You obviously have to adapt to your specific scenario, but this is a solution to the problem of finding the missing IDs. –  Eric Sep 7 '09 at 17:19
    
+1 I'm not sure I'll go with it, but I'll consider. Thanks Eric. –  Roee Adler Sep 7 '09 at 17:25
    
I couldn't get the MySql query to work (syntax errors). So I think I'll just export IDs to Excel and do some comparisons there (to a list of sequential numbers). –  Ryan Dec 12 '12 at 19:54
1  
Although it works with the example data it is not good for large amount of records. The "while" alone will take several seconds to finish if want a range bigger than 100.000 –  Gustavo Cardoso Dec 27 '12 at 19:37

Here's the query for SQL Server:

;WITH Missing (missnum, maxid)
AS
(
 SELECT 1 AS missnum, (select max(id) from @TT)
 UNION ALL
 SELECT missnum + 1, maxid FROM Missing
 WHERE missnum < maxid
)
SELECT missnum
FROM Missing
LEFT OUTER JOIN @TT tt on tt.id = Missing.missnum
WHERE tt.id is NULL
OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0);

Hope this is helpful.

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1  
What would be the comparable query on MySQL? –  Roee Adler Sep 7 '09 at 17:26
    
much slicker than a temp table. thanks –  yano Aug 20 '13 at 23:21

I know it's an old question and already has an accepted answer, but using a temp table isn't really necessary. Fixed formatting (sorry for double post).

DECLARE @TEST_ID integer, @LAST_ID integer, @ID integer

SET @TEST_ID = 1 -- start compare with this ID 
SET @LAST_ID = 100 -- end compare with this ID

WHILE @TEST_ID <= @LAST_ID 
BEGIN 
  SELECT @ID = (SELECT <column> FROM <table> WHERE <column> = @TEST_ID) 
  IF @ID IS NULL 
  BEGIN 
    PRINT 'Missing ID: ' + CAST(@TEST_ID AS VARCHAR(10)) 
  END 
  SET @TEST_ID = @TEST_ID + 1 
END
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This is an Oracle only solution. It doesn't address the full question, but is left here for others that may be using Oracle.

select level id           -- generate 1 .. 19
from dual
connect by level <= 19

minus                     -- remove from that set

select id                 -- everything that is currently in the 
from table                -- actual table
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+1 for using MINUS –  pilcrow Oct 18 '11 at 12:17

The single query can find the missing IDs..

SELECT distinct number

FROM master..spt_values

WHERE number BETWEEN 1 and (SELECT max(id) FROM MyTable)

AND number NOT IN (SELECT id FROM MyTable)
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2  
Note: This answer is specific to SQL Server –  Steve Chambers Oct 16 '13 at 14:18

Update: This method took way too long so I wrote a linux command to find gaps in a text file. It does so in reverse order so first dump all id's to a text file like so;

nohup mysql --password=xx -e 'select id from tablename order by id desc' databasename > /home/ids.txt &

The first and last two lines are just to keep track of how long it took. 1.5million IDs(ish) took me 57sec & that's on a slow server. Set the max id in i and have at it.

T="$(date +%s)"; \
i=1574115; \
while read line; do \
    if  [[ "$line" != "$i" ]] ; then \
        if [[ $i -lt 1 ]] ; then break; fi; \
        if  [[ $line -gt 1 ]] ; then \
            missingsequenceend=$(( $line + 1 )); \
            minusstr="-"; \
            missingsequence="$missingsequenceend$minusstr$i"; \
            expectnext=$(( $line - 1 )); \
            i=$expectnext; \
            echo -e "$missingsequence"; \
        fi; \
    else \
        i=$(( $i - 1 )); \
    fi; \
done \
< /home/ids.txt; \
T="$(($(date +%s)-T))"; \
echo "Time in seconds: ${T}"

Example output:

1494505-1494507
47566-47572
Time in seconds: 57

Also, I got syntax errors with the code from Eric's answer, but after changing the delimiter, using semicolons in the proper places and storing it in a procedure, it works.

Make sure you set the proper max ID, database name and table name (it's in the select query). And if you want to change the procedure name, change it in all 3 places.

use dbname;
drop procedure if exists dorepeat;
delimiter #
CREATE PROCEDURE dorepeat()
BEGIN
set @id = 1;
set @maxid = 1573736;
drop table if exists IDSeq;
create temporary table IDSeq
(
    id int
);

WHILE @id < @maxid DO
    insert into IDSeq values(@id);
    set @id = @id + 1;
END WHILE;

select 
    s.id 
from 
    IDSeq s 
    left join tablename t on 
        s.id = t.id 
 where t.id is null;

drop table if exists IDSeq;

END#
delimiter ;
CALL dorepeat;

I also found this query elwhere, but I haven't tested it.

SELECT a.id+1 AS start, MIN(b.id) - 1 AS end
    FROM tablename AS a, tablename AS b
    WHERE a.id < b.id
    GROUP BY a.id
    HAVING start < MIN(b.id)
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This problem can be solved with only one query

select lft.id + 1 as missing_ids
from tbl as lft left outer join tbl as rght on lft.id + 1 = rght.id
where rght.id is null and lft.id between 1 and (Select max(id)-1 from tbl)

Tested on Mysql

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This only finds missing IDs that are 1 greater than existing IDs. In the OPs case it misses most of the missing IDs. sqlfiddle.com/#!2/45412/1 –  Old Pro Jun 3 '13 at 1:16

TRY in MySQL

DELIMITER ||
DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS proc_missing ||
CREATE PROCEDURE proc_missing()
BEGIN 
SET @minID = (SELECT MIN(`id`) FROM `tbl_name` WHERE `user_id`=13);
SET @maxID = (SELECT MAX(`id`) FROM `tbl_name` WHERE `user_id`=13);
REPEAT 
    SET @tableID = (SELECT `id` FROM `tbl_name` WHERE `id` = @minID);
    IF (@tableID IS NULL) THEN
        INSERT INTO temp_missing SET `missing_id` = @tableID;
    END IF;
    SET @minID = @minID + 1;
UNTIL(@minID <= @maxID)
END REPEAT;
END ||
DELIMITER ;
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Try This Query. This single query is enough to get missing numbers:(Please replace TABLE_NAME to which table name you are using)

select sno as missing from(SELECT @row := @row + 1 as sno FROM 
(select 0 union all select 1 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all 
select 5 union all select 6 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all 
select 8 union all select 9) t,(select 0 union all select 1 union all select 3 
union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 6 
union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) t2,(select 0 
union all select 1 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 
union all select 6 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 
union all select 9) t3, (select 0 union all select 1 union all select 3 union 
all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 6 union all 
select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) t4, 
(SELECT @row:=0) as b where @row<1000) as a where a.sno  not in 
  (select distinct b.no from 
(select b.*,if(@mn=0,@mn:=b.no,@mn) as min,(@mx:=b.no) as max from 
  (select ID as no from TABLE_NAME as a) as b,
        (select @mn:=0,@mx:=0) as x order by no) as b) and 
         a.sno between @mn and @mx;
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This what i used to find the missing id of one table named as tablename

select a.id+1 missing_ID from tablename a where a.id+1 not in (select id from tablename b where b.id=a.id+1) and a.id!=(select id from tablename c order by id desc limit 1)

It will return the missing ids. If there are two(2) or more continuous missing ids, it will return only the first.

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