Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider this data:

12 45 64  
12 45 76  
12 37 39 87
12 67 90  
12 39 60  

In this example there are just ten different numbers. If I have a large amount of data, how can I calculate it in Perl?

I have a link from 12 to 45, from 45 to 64, but not from 12 to 64.

We don't have a route from 45 to 12, so the neighbourhood of 12 is 4 (45, 37, 67, 39), and for 39 is 2 (87, 60)

How can I count the neighbourhood for all values in this data?

Edit

Another requirement is that we want to ignore any value that is directed to itself. For example, consider we have this file:

1 4 3
1 2 2
2 6 7

In this example, the neighbourhood of 1 must be (4, 2)

The neighbourhood of 4 must be 3

The neighbourhood of 2 must be 6 (and not 2)

I mean we must remove the matching and repetition.

share|improve this question
1  
Nice editing work. –  ddoxey Dec 15 '12 at 22:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using the Graph::Directed module:

use Graph::Directed qw( );

my $graph = Graph::Directed->new();
while (<>) {
   my @points = split;
   $graph->add_edge(@points[$_-1, $_])
      for 1..$#points;
}

for my $vertex ($graph->vertices()) {
   my @successors = grep $_ != $vertex, $graph->successors($vertex);
   print("$vertex has ".@successors." successors: @successors\n");
}

Input:

1 4 3
1 2 2
2 6 7

Output:

6 has 1 successors: 7
4 has 1 successors: 3
2 has 1 successors: 6
1 has 2 successors: 4 2
3 has 0 successors:
7 has 0 successors:
share|improve this answer
    
You have correctly built a directed graph, but your code ignores its directedness. The OP clearly says the neighbourhood of ... 39 is 2 (87, 60). I think you meant to call the successors method. –  Borodin Dec 15 '12 at 23:17
    
@Borodin, doh! Thanks, fixed. (I had only verified 12, which gave the right answer with ->neighbours.) –  ikegami Dec 15 '12 at 23:29
    
Fixed so X is not returned as a neighbour of X. –  ikegami Dec 18 '12 at 19:07
    
The grep shouldn't be necessary. It makes no difference that I can see when applied to this data set. It would also make nonsense of the is_successorless_vertex test if every vertex were a successor of itself. –  Borodin Dec 18 '12 at 19:34
    
@Borodin, The responses to each of your sentences are: 1) Go reread the question because it is necessary (as it should be). 2) So what. 3) Noone said they were. –  ikegami Dec 18 '12 at 19:46

If I understand you correctly, you want to count the number of nodes in the neighbourhood of every node on the graph. I think this does what you want.

I have modified my code since you have explained that a vector from a node to itself should be ignored.

use v5.10;
use warnings;

my %routes;

while (<DATA>) {
  my @nodes = /\d+/g;
  $routes{$_} //= {} for @nodes;
  while (@nodes >= 2) {
    my ($from, $to) = @nodes;
    $routes{$from}{$to}++ unless $from == $to;
    shift @nodes;
  }
}

for my $key (sort { $a <=> $b } keys %routes) {
  my $val = $routes{$key};
  printf "%d - neighbourhood size %d",
      $key,
      scalar keys %$val;
  printf " (%s)", join ', ', keys %$val if %$val;
  print "\n";
}

__DATA__
12 45 64  
12 45 76  
12 37 39 87  
12 67 90  
12 39 60
1 4 3
1 2 2
2 6 7

output

1 - neighbourhood size 2 (4, 2)
2 - neighbourhood size 1 (6)
3 - neighbourhood size 0
4 - neighbourhood size 1 (3)
6 - neighbourhood size 1 (7)
7 - neighbourhood size 0
12 - neighbourhood size 4 (67, 39, 37, 45)
37 - neighbourhood size 1 (39)
39 - neighbourhood size 2 (60, 87)
45 - neighbourhood size 2 (64, 76)
60 - neighbourhood size 0
64 - neighbourhood size 0
67 - neighbourhood size 1 (90)
76 - neighbourhood size 0
87 - neighbourhood size 0
90 - neighbourhood size 0
share|improve this answer

Here's another option:

use strict;
use warnings;

my ( %hash, %seen );

while (<DATA>) {
    my @nums = split;

    for my $i ( 0 .. $#nums - 1 ) {
        push @{ $hash{ $nums[$i] } }, $nums[ $i + 1 ]
          if !$seen{ $nums[$i] }{ $nums[ $i + 1 ] }++;
    }
}

for my $num ( sort { $a <=> $b } keys %hash ) {
    print "$num has " . @{ $hash{$num} } . " neighbor(s): @{$hash{$num}}\n";
}

__DATA__
12 45 64  
12 45 76  
12 37 39 87
12 67 90  
12 39 60

Output:

12 has 4 neighbor(s): 45 37 67 39
37 has 1 neighbor(s): 39
39 has 2 neighbor(s): 87 60
45 has 2 neighbor(s): 64 76
67 has 1 neighbor(s): 90
share|improve this answer
    
tnx.now if we want to not consider the number that matching with orginal number, how can we do that.for example. –  parna Dec 18 '12 at 12:23
    
this data is read from bgpdump.they are not a geraph.they are AS that have a path to each other –  parna Feb 12 '13 at 22:06
my $data = <<'END_DATA';
12 45 64 
12 45 76 
12 37 39 87 
12 67 90 
12 39 60
END_DATA

my @lines = split/\n+/, $data;

# map number the list of numbers following it in the sequence 
my %neighborhoods = (); 
for my $line ( @lines ) { 
    my @nums = split m/\s+/,$line;
    for my $i ( 0 .. $#nums - 1 ) { 
        $neighborhoods{$nums[$i]}{$nums[$i+1]} = 1; 
    }
} 

foreach my $num ( sort keys %neighborhoods ) { 
   print "num [$num] neighboorhood (" . 
         ( join "-", keys %{$neighborhoods{$num}} ) . 
         ") count [" . ( scalar keys %{$neighborhoods{$num}} ) . 
         "]\n"; 
}

Output:

num [12] neighboorhood (67-39-37-45) count [4]   
num [37] neighboorhood (39) count [1]
num [39] neighboorhood (60-87) count [2]
num [45] neighboorhood (64-76) count [2]
num [67] neighboorhood (90) count [1]
share|improve this answer
1  
You should really delete your answer and add another one if you need to make such major changes to the original. As it stands the comments are now irrelevant. –  Borodin Dec 15 '12 at 22:16
1  
@Borodin, Comments can marked as addressed ("Fixed"), which may even lead to their deletion. –  ikegami Dec 15 '12 at 22:23
    
@ikegami: Please offer a link to details of this. Do you mean flagging a comment as obsolete? –  Borodin Dec 15 '12 at 23:20
    
tnx.if we want to not consider the number that is match with the orginal number, how can we do this with perl. –  parna Dec 18 '12 at 12:21
    
@ikegami: Please explain Comments can marked as addressed ("Fixed") –  Borodin Dec 18 '12 at 22:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.