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I was struggling with part of my code today to read some data from a file and add them to an object as its properties (I'm aware of how to add/read object in file without this hassle but wanted to do it this way) as below:

file is like this:

111,john,23.1
222,jack,22.5
234,adam,12.8

I was trying to read this file using following:

public ArrayList<Staff> LoadAllStaffs(){
    ArrayList<Staff> staffs = new ArrayList<Staff>();
    File file = new File(stafffile);
    Staff tmpstaff = new Staff();
    try {
        BufferedReader inputfile = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(stafffile));
        String tmp;
        while((tmp = inputfile.readLine()) != null){
            StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(tmp , ",");
            tmpstaff.setID(Integer.valueOf(st.nextToken()));
            tmpstaff.setFirstName(st.nextToken());
            tmpstaff.setSalary(Double.valueOf(st.nextToken()));
            staffs.add(tmpstaff);
            }
        } 
    catch (IOException e) {
    }
    return staffs;
}

using println this output shown from the returned arraylist:

234,adam,12.8
234,adam,12.8
234,adam,12.8

I just moved the Staff tmpstaff = new Staff(); inside the while loop and it shows what it should.

why this is happening? I read -even here- that defining variables (well, here its an Object ) inside or outside loops doesn't make any difference.

will be grateful for an explanation.

Regards

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2  
What matters here is not where the variable is declared. What matters is: how many Staff instances do you create. If you create just one instance and add it N times to the list, then of course the list will contain N times the same object, containing the same values. –  JB Nizet Dec 15 '12 at 22:19
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are not creating a new Staff instance inside the loop, you are reusing the same instance for all the iterations. So, you overwrite the values and add the same object.

Move

Staff tmpstaff = new Staff();

to the first line inside the loop.

UPDATE: To address Vash's comment, the issue here is that can be explained as that, if you want to store 3 objects, you need to create such 3 objects. You can reuse the reference (the tmpstaff variable) and effectively where it is defined it is not important (as long as all references to it are in the same scope. But you must create the 3 objects, which means 3 new commands.

UPDATE 2: To put things simpler, the text I read -even here- that defining variables (well, here its an Object ) inside or outside loops doesn't make any difference. means that

File file = new File(stafffile);
Staff tmpstaff = null; // or simpler, Staff tmpstaff;
try {
   ...
   while((tmp = inputfile.readLine()) != null){
     tmpstaff = new Staff();
     ...

and

   while((tmp = inputfile.readLine()) != null){
     Staff tmpstaff = new Staff();
     ...

are equivalent.

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Nice reflexes. :) –  Priidu Neemre Dec 15 '12 at 22:15
    
Just got lucky when reloading the question list :-D –  SJuan76 Dec 15 '12 at 22:16
    
yeah but out of topic... –  Vash - Damian Leszczyński Dec 15 '12 at 22:16
    
I mentioned that I did that, was wondering why its acting like this. thanks a lot –  Th3_c0d3r Dec 15 '12 at 22:22
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The operator new is responsible for "object creation" called instance. So when you create him outside the loop you have only one instance, that you modify every loop run. When you create that object inside the loop you have separate instance for each run.

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Well Java operates by reference on Objects. Because you are creating only one Staff() Object, there's only one Reference. Therefore, in the while Loop you change just the attributes of the Object and add the same Reference three times to the List.

You can define the variables outside the loop, but you have to instantiate a new Object inside the loop so it lookes like this:

Staff tmpStaff
while((tmp = inputfile.readLine()) != null){
tmpStaff = new Staff();
[additional Code here]
}
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If you want to create a new Staff on each pass of the loop, then you have to do the creation inside of the loop before using it.

Done outside the loop as you did, you created a new Staff indeed, but that same keeps being used each time.

A new object is created only when the new keyword is used.

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