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I currently have:

class X[+T: Numeric](val x: T)
abstract class M[N: Numeric, T <: X[N]] { // <- I'd like to remove N.
  def apply(x: Int): T
  final def row = (1 to 10).map(this(_))
}

I use it like this:

class Y(x: Double, val y: Double) extends X[Double](x)
class Z extends M[Double, Y] {           // <- So that this is simpler.
  def apply(x: Int) = new Y(0.0, 0.0)
}

It works like this:

object testapp {
  // row is properly polymorphic, allowing access to Y.y
  def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = (new Z).row.map(r => println(r.y))
}

I want Z to be simpler so that I can use M like:

class Z extends M[Y] {
  def apply(x: Int) = new Y(0.0, 0.0)
}

or, even better:

class Z extends M[Double] {           // i.e. Meaning apply can return
  def apply(x: Int) = new Y(0.0, 0.0) // any subclass of X[Double]
}

Here are my Gist iterations to reach this point.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A third way in type params vs type members is to use both.

An advantage of a type member is that it doesn't pollute the signature of child classes. The type member can remain abstract if it is superfluous (even in a concrete class); and only the bottom class must define it if necessary.

  import scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq
  class X[+T: Numeric](val x: T)
  abstract class M[+A: Numeric] {
    type W <: X[A]
    def apply(x: Int): W
    final def row: IndexedSeq[W] = (1 to 10) map apply
    def sumx: A = {  // in terms of the underlying Numeric
      val n = implicitly[Numeric[A]]
      n fromInt (0 /: row)((s,w) => s + (n toInt w.x))
    }
  }

  class Y(x: Double, val y: Double) extends X[Double](x)
  class Z extends M[Double] {
    type W = Y
    def apply(x: Int) = new Y(0.0, 0.0)
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = (new Z).row foreach (Console println _.y)
share|improve this answer
    
Chosen since answered the question most directly. Thanks. Can you clarify for me? I am reading it as : type W <: X[A] defines a type W within M such that W is a subtype of X[A]. Then in subtypes of M, W is "overriden" to be the type needed by the subtype of M? –  nix Dec 16 '12 at 18:04
1  
With the bound, type W is still abstract, so no override is required when you define it. (Like any other member.) (Spec 4.3. Also, beware stackoverflow.com/a/10223364/1296806.) –  som-snytt Dec 17 '12 at 0:26

You didn't really need class M here:

class X[+T: Numeric](val x: T)
def row[W <: X[_]](c: => Int => W) = (1 to 10).map(c)

class Y(x: Double, val y: Double) extends X[Double](x)
def z = row(_ => new Y(0.0, 0.0))

def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = z.map(r => println(r.y))

If you want to keep M, you use same idea:

class X[+T: Numeric](val x: T)
abstract class M[W <: X[_]] {
    def apply(x: Int): W
    final def row = (1 to 10).map(this(_))
}

class Y(x: Double, val y: Double) extends X[Double](x)
class Z extends M[Y] {
  def apply(x: Int) = new Y(0.0, 0.0)
}

def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = (new Z).row.map(r => println(r.y))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer but the goal isn't to eliminate M. I think I need it (but i'm considering your alternative). It's part of a larger solution. The idea is that M is a collection that can only contain types bounded by X[T] where T is Numeric. I create several subclasses of M to encapsulate different functionality against the elements. –  nix Dec 16 '12 at 3:08
    
Instead of several subclasses you can create several functions like z. I can miss something without knowledge of larger solution, but I think OO encapsulation is overhead here. –  Sergey Passichenko Dec 16 '12 at 3:14
    
BTW, I updated my answer with solution using class M –  Sergey Passichenko Dec 16 '12 at 3:21
    
The problem I have with the function-approach is that M is actually a type, specifically, a collection. But i think you might be right that i should provide functions that operate on the single parameterized type M rather than subclassing M. One problem with your answer is X[_]. _ is Any but i need Numeric. –  nix Dec 16 '12 at 4:37
1  
It will not compile with X[T] that have not implementation for Numeric typeclass in scope. Check it with 'class StringX(x: String) extends X[String](x)' –  Sergey Passichenko Dec 16 '12 at 5:02

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