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An attempt to signal between 2 threads with minimum wasted signals. Since it has been some time I have attempted this - please suggests errors/improvements if any. The intention is : 1.no deadlock 2.no updates being missed from being read 3.not raising missed signals as far as possible.

import java.util.Random;
class shareful{

    class share{
        int sharedata;
        volatile boolean  isbitset=false;
        public int getstats(){
            return sharedata;
        }
        public void setstats(int data){
            sharedata=data;
        }

        public boolean getbitset(){ return isbitset;}
        public void setbitset(boolean flag){ isbitset=flag;}
    }
    share so=new share();
    void runStatistics(){
        int check=0;
        Thread t1=new Thread(new Runnable(){
            public void run(){
                Random r=new Random();
                boolean isflagged=false;
                while (true){
                    synchronized(so){
                        try{
                            while(so.getbitset()==true){
                                        so.wait();
                            }
                        }
                        catch(InterruptedException e){}
                        so.setstats(r.nextInt(200));
                        if(so.getbitset()==false) isflagged=true;
                        so.setbitset(true);
                        if(isflagged) so.notify();

                    }
                }


            }
        });

        Thread t2=new Thread(new Runnable(){
            public void run(){
                boolean isflagged=false;
                while(true){
                    synchronized(so){
                            try{
                                    while(so.getbitset()==false){
                                    so.wait();
                                }
                            }
                            catch(InterruptedException e){}
                            int curr=so.getstats();
                            if(so.getbitset()==true) isflagged=true;
                            so.setbitset(false);
                            if(isflagged) so.notify();
                    }

                }
            }
        });

        t1.start();
        t2.start(); 


    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        shareful s=new shareful();
        s.runStatistics();
    }


}
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closed as off topic by Stephen C, Bhavik Ambani, Brian Roach, Fahim Parkar, Emil Vikström Dec 16 '12 at 9:27

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4  
If your code is indeed working, you may want to look at codereview.stackexchange.com –  A--C Dec 16 '12 at 2:31
    
the code is working(no deadlocks) - and as far as i can make out there is only one wasted signal at the beginning.But not sure if this is optimal. –  IUnknown Dec 16 '12 at 2:33
1  
IMHO the presence of while(true) is a clear indicator that this code is less than optimal. –  mre Dec 16 '12 at 2:35
    
Is there some reason you replicate some of the wait/notify logic in your own code? The wait/notify logic already does this, so why do it twice? You force extra volatile accesses for no apparent reason. (Also, why is it volatile anyway? It's only accessed inside synchronized blocks of the same object.) –  David Schwartz Dec 16 '12 at 2:37
1  
@mre - that is incorrect. The while(true) is integral to what this application is doing. Admittedly, it is not doing anything useful ... but that is not the purpose of the application. –  Stephen C Dec 16 '12 at 2:39

1 Answer 1

Suggestions in order of effectiveness (or by inverse sanity, depending on your perspective):

  1. Stop trying to manage threads manually and instead use a proven paradigm for managing concurrency like actors or software transactional memory depending on what fits your needs.
  2. Don't use mutable state when dealing with concurrency.
  3. If you must use mutable state, at least don't use any shared mutable state.

Additional suggestion: read Brian Goetz' "Java Concurrency in Practice" to discover that you should never attempt to write code at this level in a typical application.

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