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I have been stuck on this issue for a while now. Help would be much appreciated.

I have a 4 digit number read in from a file and I need to take the inside 2 digits. I thought that reading the number in as a string would be a good idea, then take the the middle two digits in a substring and use the numval function to convert them back. Unfortunately, I can't figure out how to obtain the inside two characters.

Ex. I have the number 5465, I want to get 46.

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Does this help? stackoverflow.com/questions/8208111/… –  Almo Dec 16 '12 at 2:42
    
My COBOL is rusty but apart from the above the other way would be to have a record that contains two PIC 9(2) data types. –  PeterJ Dec 16 '12 at 2:45

4 Answers 4

What Keith Thompson proposes will work fine. You might want to check that I > 0 and J > 0. That wouldn't be a problem if you know 1000 <= I <= 9999 always.

IBM Enterprise COBOL includes a MOD function, which may or may not be available with your compiler.

I think you could also do the following...

01  A-GROUP.
    05  A-NUMBER PIC 9999 VALUE ZEROES.
    05  A-STRING REDEFINES A-NUMBER.
        10  FILLER PIC X.
        10  THE-MIDDLE-TWO-DIGITS PIC XX.
        10  FILLER PIC X.

MOVE your-number TO A-NUMBER.

This should work whether your-number is defined as COMP or COMP-3, provided 0 <= your-number <= 9999.

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For clarity and correctness, I changed "PIC X" to "FILLER PIC X". Otherwise, great answer! –  Philip Jan 19 '13 at 9:17
    
The "FILLER" hasn't been required, at least in mainframe COBOL, since 1985. –  cschneid Jan 19 '13 at 14:09

You can use reference modification. Consider the following:

1 WS-MY-FIELD Pic X(4).
1 WS-TGT-FIELD Pic X(2).
...
Move WS-MY-FIELD (2:2) to WS-TGT-FIELD

The first number indicates the start position (1 based) and the second number indicates the length.

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If you have it as a number rather than as a string, you can do it arithmetically. Given that I is 5465, and you want to store 46 in J:

DIVIDE I BY 10 GIVING J.
DIVIDE J BY 100 GIVING ignored REMAINDER J.
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I can't believe I'm answering a COBOL question. 8-)} And if there's a cleaner way to compute a remainder (mod or % operator in some other languages), I'd be interested in seeing it. –  Keith Thompson Dec 16 '12 at 2:59
01  a-long-piece-of-data.
    05  the-first-character pic x.
    05  the-two-characters-we-want pic xx.
    05  the-last-character pic x.

01  a-short-piece-of-data pic xx.
01  filler redefines a-short-piece-of-data.
    05  a-short-unsigned-number pic 99.

MOVE the-two-characters-we-want TO a-short-piece-of-data
MOVE/ADD/COMPUTE/whatever a-short-unsigned-number

or MOVE a-short-piece-of-data TO wherever

Have a signed number and want to retain the sign?

01  a-long-number PIC S9(4).
01  FILLER REDEFINES a-long-number.
    05  FILLER PIC X.
    05  an-integer-with-one-decimal-place PIC S99V9.

01  a-short-number-no-decimals PIC S99.

MOVE an-integer-with-one-decimal-place TO a-short-number-no-decimals
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