Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Pardon my poor python skills, I am rather new to the language!

None the less, I am confused by the results I am getting from twinx() currently. I am not sure why when I twin the x axis, the ticks on the right hand side y axis seem to double.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x = linspace(0,2*pi,100)
y = sin(x) + 100*rand(len(x))
z = cos(x) + 100*rand(len(x))
data = []
data.append(y)
data.append(z)

fig = plt.figure(1)
for kk in range(len(data)):
    ax1 = fig.add_subplot(111)
    ax1.plot(x.T, data[kk], 'b.-')

plt.show()

The first plot displays (to my mind) the correct behavior left Y axis

fig2 = plt.figure(2)
for kk in range(len(data)):
    ax3 = fig2.add_subplot(111)
    ax4 = ax3.twinx()
    ax4.plot(x.T, data[kk], 'b.-')

plt.show()

While the second plot (where all I have done is flip the axis) seems to have poor y tick behavior wherein the two 'curves' each get their own tick marks. right y axis

Any thoughts as to why this might be occurring would be greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because that's what twinx is supposed to do :)

Seriously, though, the point of twinx is to create an independent y-axis on the same plot. By default, it shows the ticks for the second, independent y-axis on the right hand side of the plot.

The idea is that you can do something like this using twinx (or twiny if you want two independent x-axes):

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax2 = ax.twinx()

x = np.linspace(0, 10, 100)

ax.plot(x, np.sin(x), color='blue')
ax.set_ylabel(ylabel='Y-Value 1', color='blue')
ax.set_xlabel('Same X-values')

ax2.plot(x, x**3, color='green')
ax2.set_ylabel('Y-Value 2', color='green')

plt.show()

enter image description here

If you just want two curves that share the same axes, just plot them on the same axes. E.g.:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

fig, ax = plt.subplots()

x = np.linspace(0, 10, 100)
ax.plot(x, x, label='$y=x$')
ax.plot(x, 3 * x, label='$y=3x$')
ax.legend(loc='upper left')

ax.set(xlabel='Same X-values', ylabel='Same Y-values')

plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. Please see my updated post with plots. I wonder if it has anything to do with my install. I'm using OS X 10.8.2 with Python 2.7.3 and Ipython 0.12.1 –  not link Dec 17 '12 at 2:04
    
Thanks for adding the images showing the problem. That's definitely not normal behavior. How did you install matplotlib? (e.g. homebrew, one of the binaries from the matplotlib site, etc) –  Joe Kington Dec 17 '12 at 4:23
    
Actually, there's probably a simpler explanation. Don't use calls like plt.figure(1), as it won't create a new figure, it just returns figure number 1. Just use fig = plt.figure() instead and leave out the number argument entirely. You're probably adding new axes on top of the old axes on an existing figure when you intended to create a new figure. This causes the ticks from the previous axes to "poke out" from behind the new axes you just added. –  Joe Kington Dec 17 '12 at 4:31
    
I tried it without the number in the plt.figure() command as you recommended and I get the same result as earlier. I installed python with the EPD installer ver 7.3 for OS X and thus have matplotlib 1.1.0 (as can be seen here). –  not link Dec 17 '12 at 21:05
    
Note, I just tried generating my plots on a Windows 7 computer with EPD installed and received the same results. –  not link Dec 17 '12 at 21:27

If you take the call to twinx() and add_subplot() out of the loop, I think you'll get the figure you're after. Like so:

fig2 = plt.figure(2)
ax3 = fig2.add_subplot(111)
ax4 = ax3.twinx()
for kk in range(len(data)):
    ax4.plot(x.T, data[kk], 'b.-')

plt.show()

By the end of your loop you're calling twinx() twice, so you naturally get two twinned axes. Since they have different scales, the numbers overlap in an awkward way.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.