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OK, here's my situation :

  • I have a function - let's say U64 calc (U64 x) - which takes a 64-bit integer parameter, performs some CPU-intensive operation, and returns a 64-bit value
  • Now, given that I know ALL possible inputs (the xs) of that function beforehand (there are some 16000 though), I thought it might be better to pre-calculate them and then fetch them on demand (from an array-like structure).
  • The ideal situation would be to store them all in some array U64 CALC[] and retrieve them by index (the x again)
  • And here's the issue : I may know what the possible inputs for my calc function are, but they are most definitely NOT consecutive (e.g. not from 1 to 16000, but values that may go as low as 0 and as high as some trillions - always withing a 64-bit range)

E.G.

  X        CALC[X]
-----------------------
  123123   123123123
  12312    12312312
  897523   986123

  etc.

And here comes my question :

  • How would you store them?
  • What workaround would you prefer?
  • Now, given that these values (from CALC) will have to be accessed some thousands-to-millions of times, per sec, which would be the best solution performance-wise?

Note : I'm no mentioning anything I've thought of or tried so as not to turn the answers into some debate of A vs B type-of-thing, and mostly not influence anyone...

share|improve this question
7  
Profile using map, set, and unordered_map, then make an informed decision. –  Retired Ninja Dec 16 '12 at 4:48
    
Showing what you've tried might help. There are also some answers here that might help, including one that implies using a map has pretty good performance. Also consider a hashmap. –  Rob I Dec 16 '12 at 4:48
    
you could also try to use a trie. –  didierc Dec 16 '12 at 4:50
    
if you know the access patterns of your data structures, you could also implement some caching techniques (LRU, MRU comes to mind). –  didierc Dec 16 '12 at 5:13
3  
You could consider using a minimal perfect hash. Most of the literature for this concentrates on strings, but I see no reason the technique could not be used on integers. –  md5i Dec 16 '12 at 5:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would use some sort of hash function that creates an index to a u64 pair where one is the value the key was created from and the other the replacement value. Technically the index could be three bytes long if you need to conserve space but I'd use u32s. If the stored value does not match the value computed on (hash collision) you'd enter an overflow handler.

  • You need to determine a custom hashing algorithm to fit your data
  • Since you know the size of the data you don't need algorithms that allow the data to grow.
  • I'd be wary of using some standard algorithm because they seldom fit specific data
  • I'd be wary of using a C++ method unless you are sure the code is WYSIWYG (doesn't generate a lot of calls)
  • Your index should be 25% larger than the number of pairs

Run through all possible inputs and determine min, max, average and standard deviation for the number of collisions and use these to determine the acceptable performance level. Then profile to achieve the best possible code.

The required memory space (using a u32 index) comes out to (4*1.25)+8+8 = 21 bytes per pair or 336 MeB, no problem on a typical PC.

________ EDIT________

I have been challenged by "RocketRoy" to put my money where my mouth is. Here goes:

The problem has to do with collision handling in a (fixed size) hash index. To set the stage:

  • I have a list of n entries where a field in the entry contains the value v that the hash is computed from
  • I have a vector of n*1.25 (approximately) indeces such that the number of indeces x is a prime number
  • A prime number y is computed which is a fraction of x
  • The vector is initialized to say -1 to denote unoccupied

Pretty standard stuff I think you'll agree.

The entries in the list are processed and the hash value h computed and modulo'd and used as an index into the vector and the index to the entry is placed there.

Eventually I encounter the situation where the vector entry pointed to by the index is occupied (doesn't contain -1) - voilà, a collision.

So what do I do? I keep the original h as ho, add y to h and take modulo x and get a new index into the vector. If the entry is unoccupied I use it, otherwise I continue with add y modulo x until I reach ho. In theory, this will happen because both x and y are prime numbers. In practice x is larger than n so it won't.

So the "re-hash" that RocketRoy claims is very costly is no such thing.

The tricky part with this method - as with all hashing methods - is to:

  • Determine a suitable value for x (becomes less tricky the larger x finally used)
  • Determine the algorithm a for h=a(v)%x such that a the h's index reasonably evenly ("randomly") into the index vector with as few collisions as possible
  • Determine a suitable value for y such that collisions index reasonably evenly ("randomly") into the index vector

________ EDIT________

I'm sorry I've taken so long to produce this code ... other things have had higher priorities.

Anyway, here is the code which proves that hashing has better prospects for quick lookups than a binary tree. It runs through a bunch of hashing index sizes and algorithms to aid in finding the most suitable combo for the specific data. For every algorithm the code will print the first index size such that no lookup takes longer than fourteen searches (worst case for binary searching) and an average lookup takes less than 1.5 searches.

I have a fondness for prime numbers in these types of applications, in case you haven't noticed.

There are many ways of creating a hashing algorithm with its mandatory overflow handling. I opted for simplicity assuming it will translate into speed ... and it does. On my laptop with an i5 M 480 @ 2.67 GHz an average lookup requires between 55 and 60 clock cycles (comes out to around 45 million lookups per second). I implemented a special get operation with a constant number of indeces and ditto rehash value and the cycle count dropped to 40 (65 million lookups per second). If you look at the line calling getOpSpec the index i is xor'ed with 0x444 to exercise the caches to achieve more "real world"-like results.

I must again point out that the program suggests suitable combinations for the specific data. Other data may require a different combo.

The source code contains both the code for generating the 16000 unsigned long long pairs and for testing different constants (index sizes and rehash values):

#include <windows.h>

#define i8    signed char
#define i16          short
#define i32          long
#define i64          long long
#define id  i64
#define u8           char
#define u16 unsigned short
#define u32 unsigned long
#define u64 unsigned long long
#define ud  u64

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

u64 prime_find_next     (const u64 value);
u64 prime_find_previous (const u64 value);

static inline volatile unsigned long long rdtsc_to_rax (void)
{
  unsigned long long lower,upper;

  asm volatile( "rdtsc\n"
                : "=a"(lower), "=d"(upper));
  return lower|(upper<<32);
}

static u16 index[65536];

static u64 nindeces,rehshFactor;

static struct PAIRS {u64 oval,rval;} pairs[16000] = {
#include "pairs.h"
};

struct HASH_STATS
{
  u64 ninvocs,nrhshs,nworst;
} getOpStats,putOpStats;

i8 putOp (u16 index[], const struct PAIRS data[], const u64 oval, const u64 ci)
{
  u64 nworst=1,ho,h,i;
  i8 success=1;

  ++putOpStats.ninvocs;
  ho=oval%nindeces;
  h=ho;
  do
  {
    i=index[h];
    if (i==0xffff)    /* unused position */
    {
      index[h]=(u16)ci;
      goto added;
    }
    if (oval==data[i].oval) goto duplicate;

    ++putOpStats.nrhshs;
    ++nworst;

    h+=rehshFactor;
    if (h>=nindeces) h-=nindeces;
  } while (h!=ho);

  exhausted:    /* should not happen */
  duplicate:
    success=0;

  added:
  if (nworst>putOpStats.nworst) putOpStats.nworst=nworst;

  return success;
}

i8 getOp (u16 index[], const struct PAIRS data[], const u64 oval, u64 *rval)
{
  u64 ho,h,i;
  i8 success=1;

  ho=oval%nindeces;
  h=ho;
  do
  {
    i=index[h];
    if (i==0xffffu) goto not_found;    /* unused position */

    if (oval==data[i].oval)
    {
      *rval=data[i].rval;    /* fetch the replacement value */
      goto found;
    }

    h+=rehshFactor;
    if (h>=nindeces) h-=nindeces;
  } while (h!=ho);

  exhausted:
  not_found:    /* should not happen */
    success=0;

  found:

  return success;
}

volatile i8 stop = 0;

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
  u64 i,rval,mulup,divdown,start;
  double ave;

  SetThreadAffinityMask (GetCurrentThread(), 0x00000004ull);

  divdown=5;   //5
  while (divdown<=100)
  {
    mulup=3;  // 3
    while (mulup<divdown)
    {
      nindeces=16000;
      while (nindeces<65500)
      {
        nindeces=   prime_find_next     (nindeces);
        rehshFactor=nindeces*mulup/divdown;
        rehshFactor=prime_find_previous (rehshFactor);

        memset (index, 0xff, sizeof(index));
        memset (&putOpStats, 0, sizeof(struct HASH_STATS));

        i=0;
        while (i<16000)
        {
          if (!putOp (index, pairs, pairs[i].oval, (u16) i)) stop=1;

          ++i;
        }

        ave=(double)(putOpStats.ninvocs+putOpStats.nrhshs)/(double)putOpStats.ninvocs;
        if (ave<1.5 && putOpStats.nworst<15)
        {
          start=rdtsc_to_rax ();
          i=0;
          while (i<16000)
          {
            if (!getOp (index, pairs, pairs[i^0x0444]. oval, &rval)) stop=1;
            ++i;
          }
          start=rdtsc_to_rax ()-start+8000;   /* 8000 is half of 16000 (pairs), for rounding */

          printf ("%u;%u;%u;%u;%1.3f;%u;%u\n", (u32)mulup, (u32)divdown, (u32)nindeces, (u32)rehshFactor, ave, (u32) putOpStats.nworst, (u32) (start/16000ull));

          goto found;
        }

        nindeces+=2;
      }
      printf ("%u;%u\n", (u32)mulup, (u32)divdown);

      found:
      mulup=prime_find_next (mulup);
    }
    divdown=prime_find_next (divdown);
  }

  SetThreadAffinityMask (GetCurrentThread(), 0x0000000fu);

  return 0;
}

It was not possible to include the generated pairs file (an answer is apparently limited to 30000 characters). But send a message to my inbox and I'll mail it.

And these are the results:

3;5;35569;21323;1.390;14;73
3;7;33577;14389;1.435;14;60
5;7;32069;22901;1.474;14;61
3;11;35107;9551;1.412;14;59
5;11;33967;15427;1.446;14;61
7;11;34583;22003;1.422;14;59
3;13;34253;7901;1.439;14;61
5;13;34039;13063;1.443;14;60
7;13;32801;17659;1.456;14;60
11;13;33791;28591;1.436;14;59
3;17;34337;6053;1.413;14;59
5;17;32341;9511;1.470;14;61
7;17;32507;13381;1.474;14;62
11;17;33301;21529;1.454;14;60
13;17;34981;26737;1.403;13;59
3;19;33791;5333;1.437;14;60
5;19;35149;9241;1.403;14;59
7;19;33377;12289;1.439;14;97
11;19;34337;19867;1.417;14;59
13;19;34403;23537;1.430;14;61
17;19;33923;30347;1.467;14;61
3;23;33857;4409;1.425;14;60
5;23;34729;7547;1.429;14;60
7;23;32801;9973;1.456;14;61
11;23;33911;16127;1.445;14;60
13;23;33637;19009;1.435;13;60
17;23;34439;25453;1.426;13;60
19;23;33329;27529;1.468;14;62
3;29;32939;3391;1.474;14;62
5;29;34543;5953;1.437;13;60
7;29;34259;8263;1.414;13;59
11;29;34367;13033;1.409;14;60
13;29;33049;14813;1.444;14;60
17;29;34511;20219;1.422;14;60
19;29;33893;22193;1.445;13;61
23;29;34693;27509;1.412;13;92
3;31;34019;3271;1.441;14;60
5;31;33923;5449;1.460;14;61
7;31;33049;7459;1.442;14;60
11;31;35897;12721;1.389;14;59
13;31;35393;14831;1.397;14;59
17;31;33773;18517;1.425;14;60
19;31;33997;20809;1.442;14;60
23;31;34841;25847;1.417;14;59
29;31;33857;31667;1.426;14;60
3;37;32569;2633;1.476;14;61
5;37;34729;4691;1.419;14;59
7;37;34141;6451;1.439;14;60
11;37;34549;10267;1.410;13;60
13;37;35117;12329;1.423;14;60
17;37;34631;15907;1.429;14;63
19;37;34253;17581;1.435;14;60
23;37;32909;20443;1.453;14;61
29;37;33403;26177;1.445;14;60
31;37;34361;28771;1.413;14;59
3;41;34297;2503;1.424;14;60
5;41;33587;4093;1.430;14;60
7;41;34583;5903;1.404;13;59
11;41;32687;8761;1.440;14;60
13;41;34457;10909;1.439;14;60
17;41;34337;14221;1.425;14;59
19;41;32843;15217;1.476;14;62
23;41;35339;19819;1.423;14;59
29;41;34273;24239;1.436;14;60
31;41;34703;26237;1.414;14;60
37;41;33343;30089;1.456;14;61
3;43;34807;2423;1.417;14;59
5;43;35527;4129;1.413;14;60
7;43;33287;5417;1.467;14;61
11;43;33863;8647;1.436;14;60
13;43;34499;10427;1.418;14;78
17;43;34549;13649;1.431;14;60
19;43;33749;14897;1.429;13;60
23;43;34361;18371;1.409;14;59
29;43;33149;22349;1.452;14;61
31;43;34457;24821;1.428;14;60
37;43;32377;27851;1.482;14;81
41;43;33623;32057;1.424;13;59
3;47;33757;2153;1.459;14;61
5;47;33353;3547;1.445;14;61
7;47;34687;5153;1.414;13;59
11;47;34519;8069;1.417;14;60
13;47;34549;9551;1.412;13;59
17;47;33613;12149;1.461;14;61
19;47;33863;13687;1.443;14;60
23;47;35393;17317;1.402;14;59
29;47;34747;21433;1.432;13;60
31;47;34871;22993;1.409;14;59
37;47;34729;27337;1.425;14;59
41;47;33773;29453;1.438;14;60
43;47;31253;28591;1.487;14;62
3;53;33623;1901;1.430;14;59
5;53;34469;3229;1.430;13;60
7;53;34883;4603;1.408;14;59
11;53;34511;7159;1.412;13;59
13;53;32587;7963;1.453;14;60
17;53;34297;10993;1.432;13;80
19;53;33599;12043;1.443;14;64
23;53;34337;14897;1.415;14;59
29;53;34877;19081;1.424;14;61
31;53;34913;20411;1.406;13;59
37;53;34429;24029;1.417;13;60
41;53;34499;26683;1.418;14;59
43;53;32261;26171;1.488;14;62
47;53;34253;30367;1.437;14;79
3;59;33503;1699;1.432;14;61
5;59;34781;2939;1.424;14;60
7;59;35531;4211;1.403;14;59
11;59;34487;6427;1.420;14;59
13;59;33563;7393;1.453;14;61
17;59;34019;9791;1.440;14;60
19;59;33967;10937;1.447;14;60
23;59;33637;13109;1.438;14;60
29;59;34487;16943;1.424;14;59
31;59;32687;17167;1.480;14;61
37;59;35353;22159;1.404;14;59
41;59;34499;23971;1.431;14;60
43;59;34039;24799;1.445;14;60
47;59;32027;25471;1.499;14;62
53;59;34019;30557;1.449;14;61
3;61;35059;1723;1.418;14;60
5;61;34351;2803;1.416;13;60
7;61;35099;4021;1.412;14;59
11;61;34019;6133;1.442;14;60
13;61;35023;7459;1.406;14;88
17;61;35201;9803;1.414;14;61
19;61;34679;10799;1.425;14;101
23;61;34039;12829;1.441;13;60
29;61;33871;16097;1.446;14;60
31;61;34147;17351;1.427;14;61
37;61;34583;20963;1.412;14;59
41;61;32999;22171;1.452;14;62
43;61;33857;23857;1.431;14;98
47;61;34897;26881;1.431;14;60
53;61;33647;29231;1.434;14;60
59;61;32999;31907;1.454;14;60
3;67;32999;1471;1.455;14;61
5;67;35171;2621;1.403;14;59
7;67;33851;3533;1.463;14;61
11;67;34607;5669;1.437;14;60
13;67;35081;6803;1.416;14;61
17;67;33941;8609;1.417;14;60
19;67;34673;9829;1.427;14;60
23;67;35099;12043;1.415;14;60
29;67;33679;14563;1.452;14;61
31;67;34283;15859;1.437;14;60
37;67;32917;18169;1.460;13;61
41;67;33461;20443;1.441;14;61
43;67;34313;22013;1.426;14;60
47;67;33347;23371;1.452;14;61
53;67;33773;26713;1.434;14;60
59;67;35911;31607;1.395;14;58
61;67;34157;31091;1.431;14;63
3;71;34483;1453;1.423;14;59
5;71;34537;2423;1.428;14;59
7;71;33637;3313;1.428;13;60
11;71;32507;5023;1.465;14;79
13;71;35753;6529;1.403;14;59
17;71;33347;7963;1.444;14;61
19;71;35141;9397;1.410;14;59
23;71;32621;10559;1.475;14;61
29;71;33637;13729;1.429;14;60
31;71;33599;14657;1.443;14;60
37;71;34361;17903;1.396;14;59
41;71;33757;19489;1.435;14;61
43;71;34583;20939;1.413;14;59
47;71;34589;22877;1.441;14;60
53;71;35353;26387;1.418;14;59
59;71;35323;29347;1.406;14;59
61;71;35597;30577;1.401;14;59
67;71;34537;32587;1.425;14;59
3;73;34613;1409;1.418;14;59
5;73;32969;2251;1.453;14;62
7;73;33049;3167;1.448;14;61
11;73;33863;5101;1.435;14;60
13;73;34439;6131;1.456;14;60
17;73;33629;7829;1.455;14;61
19;73;34739;9029;1.421;14;60
23;73;33071;10399;1.469;14;61
29;73;33359;13249;1.460;14;61
31;73;33767;14327;1.422;14;59
37;73;32939;16693;1.490;14;62
41;73;33739;18947;1.438;14;60
43;73;33937;19979;1.432;14;61
47;73;33767;21739;1.422;14;59
53;73;33359;24203;1.435;14;60
59;73;34361;27767;1.401;13;59
61;73;33827;28229;1.443;14;60
67;73;34421;31583;1.423;14;71
71;73;33053;32143;1.447;14;60
3;79;35027;1327;1.410;14;60
5;79;34283;2161;1.432;14;60
7;79;34439;3049;1.432;14;60
11;79;34679;4817;1.416;14;59
13;79;34667;5701;1.405;14;59
17;79;33637;7237;1.428;14;60
19;79;34469;8287;1.417;14;60
23;79;34439;10009;1.433;14;60
29;79;33427;12269;1.448;13;61
31;79;33893;13297;1.445;14;61
37;79;33863;15823;1.439;14;60
41;79;32983;17107;1.450;14;60
43;79;34613;18803;1.431;14;60
47;79;33457;19891;1.457;14;61
53;79;33961;22777;1.435;14;61
59;79;32983;24631;1.465;14;60
61;79;34337;26501;1.428;14;60
67;79;33547;28447;1.458;14;61
71;79;32653;29339;1.473;14;61
73;79;34679;32029;1.429;14;64
3;83;35407;1277;1.405;14;59
5;83;32797;1973;1.451;14;60
7;83;33049;2777;1.443;14;61
11;83;33889;4483;1.431;14;60
13;83;35159;5503;1.409;14;59
17;83;34949;7151;1.412;14;59
19;83;32957;7541;1.467;14;61
23;83;32569;9013;1.470;14;61
29;83;33287;11621;1.474;14;61
31;83;33911;12659;1.448;13;60
37;83;33487;14923;1.456;14;62
41;83;33587;16573;1.438;13;60
43;83;34019;17623;1.435;14;60
47;83;31769;17987;1.483;14;62
53;83;33049;21101;1.451;14;61
59;83;32369;23003;1.465;14;61
61;83;32653;23993;1.469;14;61
67;83;33599;27109;1.437;14;61
71;83;33713;28837;1.452;14;61
73;83;33703;29641;1.454;14;61
79;83;34583;32911;1.417;14;59
3;89;34147;1129;1.415;13;60
5;89;32797;1831;1.461;14;61
7;89;33679;2647;1.443;14;73
11;89;34543;4261;1.427;13;60
13;89;34603;5051;1.419;14;60
17;89;34061;6491;1.444;14;60
19;89;34457;7351;1.422;14;79
23;89;33529;8663;1.450;14;61
29;89;34283;11161;1.431;14;60
31;89;35027;12197;1.411;13;59
37;89;34259;14221;1.403;14;59
41;89;33997;15649;1.434;14;60
43;89;33911;16127;1.445;14;60
47;89;34949;18451;1.419;14;59
53;89;34367;20443;1.434;14;60
59;89;33791;22397;1.430;14;59
61;89;34961;23957;1.404;14;59
67;89;33863;25471;1.433;13;60
71;89;35149;28031;1.414;14;79
73;89;33113;27143;1.447;14;60
79;89;32909;29209;1.458;14;61
83;89;33617;31337;1.400;14;59
3;97;34211;1051;1.448;14;60
5;97;34807;1789;1.430;14;60
7;97;33547;2417;1.446;14;60
11;97;35171;3967;1.407;14;89
13;97;32479;4349;1.474;14;61
17;97;34319;6011;1.444;14;60
19;97;32381;6337;1.491;14;64
23;97;33617;7963;1.421;14;59
29;97;33767;10093;1.423;14;59
31;97;33641;10739;1.447;14;60
37;97;34589;13187;1.425;13;60
41;97;34171;14437;1.451;14;60
43;97;31973;14159;1.484;14;62
47;97;33911;16127;1.445;14;61
53;97;34031;18593;1.448;14;80
59;97;32579;19813;1.457;14;61
61;97;34421;21617;1.417;13;60
67;97;33739;23297;1.448;14;60
71;97;33739;24691;1.435;14;60
73;97;33863;25471;1.433;13;60
79;97;34381;27997;1.419;14;59
83;97;33967;29063;1.446;14;60
89;97;33521;30727;1.441;14;60

Cols 1 and 2 are used to calculate a rough relationship between the rehash value and the index size. The next two are the first index size/rehash factor combination which averages less than 1.5 searches for a lookup with a worst case of 14 searches. Then average and worst case. Finally, the last column is the average number of clock cycles per lookup. It does not take into account the time required to read the time stamp register.

The actual memory space for the best constants (# of indeces = 31253 and rehash factor = 28591) comes out to more than I initially indicated (16000*2*8 + 1,25*16000*2 => 296000 bytes). The actual size is 16000*2*8+31253*2 => 318506.

The fastest combination is an approximate ratio of 11/31 with an index size of 35897 and rehash value of 12721. This will average 1.389 (1 initial hash + 0.389 rehashes) with a maximum of 14 (1+13).

________ EDIT________

I removed the "goto found;" in main () to show all combinations and it shows that much better performance is possible, of course at the expense of a larger index size. For example the combination 57667 and 33797 yields and average of 1.192 and a maximum rehash of 6. The combination 44543 and 23399 yields a 1.249 average and 10 maximum rehashes (it saves (57667-44543)*2=26468 bytes of index table compared to 57667/33797).

Specialized functions with hard-coded hash index size and rehash factor will execute in 60-70% of the time compared to variables. This is probably due to the compiler (gcc 64-bit) substituting the modulo with multiplications and not having to fetch the values from memory locations as they will be coded as immediate values.

________ EDIT________

On the subject of caches I see two issues.

The first is data cacheing which I don't think will be possible because the lookup will just be a small step in some larger process and you run the risk of the table data's cache lines begin invalidated to a lesser or (probably) greater degree - if not entirely - by other data accesses in other steps of the larger process. I e the more code executed and data accessed in the process as a whole the less likely it will be that any pertinent lookup data will remain in the caches (this may or may not be pertinent to the OP's situation). To find an entry using (my) hashing you will encounter two cache misses (one to load the correct part of the index, and the other to load the area containg the entry itself) for every comparison that needs to be performed. Finding an entry on the first try will have cost two misses, the second try four etc. In my example the 60 clock cycle average cost per lookup implies that the table probably resided entirely in the L2 cache and with L1 not having to go there in a majority of the cases. My x86-64 CPU has L1-3, RAM wait states of approximately 4, 10, 40 and 100 which to me shows that RAM was completely kept out and L3 mostly.

The second is code cacheing which will have a more significant impact if it is small, tight, in-lined and with few control transfers (jumps and calls). My hash routine probably resides entirely in the L1 code cache. For more normal cases, the fewer the number of code cache line loads the faster it will be.

share|improve this answer
    
...and still no code. I'll let you in on a secret. The reason I've been pushing you for code, is because while bsearch() qsort() are simple, easy, and in the lib, you would have to make a substantial investment of time to create a hash function to satisfy the requirements above. IE: being so reluctant to do the work of creating and performance testing the proposed hash function, you're making my point for me. Also, my claim is not that the rehash is computationally expensive, it's that other things will hash to the same rehash location, causing cascading failures. –  RocketRoy Dec 21 '12 at 8:23
    
Then I'll let you in on a secret. The OP wrote "fastest way to store and retrieve" which you and I obviously read quite differently. Though I can't look inside your head I assume you have focused on "fastest way to get something up and running" whereas I read it as "the most processing efficient way (i e fastest execution time)." Nobody with any significant knowledge on hashing - oh yes, I am one of them - will claim that efficient hash algorithms are easy to implement. But that was not an issue the OP appeared interested in so I didn't assume he was. –  Olof Forshell Dec 21 '12 at 12:29
    
My RX to the OP was based on balancing the potential minor improvement in performance (a bad hash would perform worse) against a very large investment of time. Since other's here had already benchmarked bsearch() and found it nearly an order of magnitude beyond the OP's requirements that was the correct call. Now if money/time is no object, and you want to learn a lot about writing hash routines, then you might want to use a hash, but the OP was looking for off-the-shelf solutions, so that wasn't his situation. –  RocketRoy Dec 21 '12 at 23:24
1  
Like I said: our respective understandings of the word "fastest" are quite different. I read it literally and try to answer the question accordingly. You read in lot's of other things which may or may not be pertinent. I guess if someone were to ask us "what's the fastest way to lap at Indianapolis" I'd give a backgrounder on racing car construction (if that were my field of expertise) and you'd say buy a standard car, drop in the biggest engine you can find and drive. So my approach is to explain from a theoretical/practical standpoint and yours is time to market. –  Olof Forshell Dec 22 '12 at 7:37
1  
I've seen some good benchmarks comparing the STL's map and unordered set containers, and for those the unordered set (aka, a hashtable) was about 3X as fast. Not sure about search(). The Achilles Heel of hash tables is an unknown # of values, and in some cases, like large, variable-length strings, the poor performance of the hash function. Search would also require that the number of values be known up front. –  user2548100 Dec 18 '13 at 1:21

Make an array of structures of key val pairs.

Sort the array by key, put this in your program as static array, would only be 128kbyte.

Then in your program a simple binary look up by key will need on average only 14 key comparisons to find the right value. Should be able to approach speeds of 300 million look ups per second on modern pc.

You can sort with qsort and search with bsearch, both std lib functions.

share|improve this answer
    
Simple, straight-forward, and robust. I would use this every time for the problem as stated. Hashes are fast, but only if you know the data well, and know it won't change. Typical hash use is for key-words in a parser. You know the words, their character content & distribution, and number, so you can optimize the hash. Not your problem AFAICT. –  RocketRoy Dec 16 '12 at 7:23
    
I would only allocate the storage on the stack if the number (~16,000) never changes. Otherwise you'll either have to constantly change the array size, allocate one arbitrarily large, or have your program blow up. IE: a maintenance nightmare. Use malloc() and allocate the exact storage you need. Foolproof. –  RocketRoy Dec 16 '12 at 7:39
    
300 million lookups per second. On a 3GHz machine this comes out to one lookup every 10 Hz. This means one comparison per 0.7 Hz. How do you propose to handle the (at least) three instructions (fetch, compare and conditional jump) for the comparison, several to find the new comparison position not to mention cache misses? Mutliple cores are of no help in case you didn't know. Back to the drawing board for you. –  Olof Forshell Dec 16 '12 at 8:22
    
@RocketRoy: if you have a need for speed you use the tools that can be brought to bear. Granted a binary search is faster to implement but will be up to an order of magnitude slower than a properly functioning hash routine. Foolproof? Not if you want the fastest possible solution. –  Olof Forshell Dec 16 '12 at 8:31
    
@OlofForshell ..and what do you do about collisions? Call malloc() and resort to linear searches of the extensions? You can't avoid collisions unless you know a lot about the nature of the data, AND, are willing to allocate at least 125% of the space that will be used. I've used and tested both extensively. Hashes never live up to their theoretical performance potential with this kind of data, and they take a lot of time to get right if you do know your data. Rehashes kill performance. Total wipeout. –  RocketRoy Dec 16 '12 at 9:08

I wouldn't worry about performance too much. This simple example, using an array and binary search lower_bound

#include <stdint.h>
#include <algorithm>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

const int N = 16000;
typedef std::pair<uint64_t, uint64_t> CALC;
CALC calc[N];

static inline bool cmp_calcs(const CALC &c1, const CALC &c2)
{
    return c1.first < c2.first;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    std::iostream::sync_with_stdio(false);
    for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
        calc[i] = std::make_pair(i, i);

    std::sort(&calc[0], &calc[N], cmp_calcs);

    for (long i = 0; i < 10000000; ++i) {
        int r = rand() % 16000;
        CALC *p = std::lower_bound(&calc[0], &calc[N], std::make_pair(r, 0), cmp_calcs);
        if (p->first == r)
            std::cout << "found\n";
    }

    return 0;
}

and compiled with

g++ -O2 example.cpp

does, including setup, 10,000,000 searches in about 2 seconds on my 5 year old PC.

share|improve this answer
1  
YOU wouldn't worry but it appears the OP may well be. –  Olof Forshell Dec 16 '12 at 8:47
    
@OlofForshell Within the constraints of about 16000 entries with some thousands to millions lookups per second, this is well achieved with my old PC. A current machine should do a lot better. So, when the goal is met, I wouldn't worry. ;-) –  Olaf Dietsche Dec 16 '12 at 13:19
    
@OlafDietsche, how about 40 million per second? –  RocketRoy Oct 17 at 22:45
    
@RocketRoy I guess, this depends on the hardware you have available. When you consider the search alone (no rand(), no output), this should be easily doable. My current PC (2013, AMD A10) does 40 million in 1.5 seconds. –  Olaf Dietsche Oct 18 at 11:31
    
Very true. Did you use my Bsearch2() code below for your benchmark? How many clocks/search? I realized about a year ago that at least 2 generations of programmers have come up with cheap, ubiquitous databases like MySQL, and so have no clue how to manage structured data any other way. This was in part my motivation for engaging on this question. –  RocketRoy Oct 18 at 18:51

This code was taken from K&R, 2nd Edition, pg 134, and optimized. The idea for switching to a linear search, after a binary search eliminates most of the keys, came from the Microsoft C 6.0 compiler's Standard Library implementation of bsearch().

For (1<<14) AKA 16k elements, using the STL unordered_map container for Hash, and using the Bsearch2() routine here, I get 28M/sec, and 43M/sec - 120 and 78 clocks per search respectively. For perspective, it takes about 30 clocks to convert an int_32 into an equivalent string of digits.

Pushing RAND_RANGER up to 2048, and SCAN_LENGTH down to 17 (not many key combos with these settings) pushes Bsearch2() up to 46M/sec, but except for telemetry, like current temp, or location, or part count/time, this narrow a distribution of keys is unlikely, so go with the 43.5M/sec as the headline number. For very small Ns, like ((1<<10)-1), 55M+ are possible.

The only parameter you might want to change for ANY array/vector/table size being searched is SCAN_LENGTH. Other than that this is drop-in code for any application. If your table size changes over time, no problem, even if by orders of magnitude.

|

As you can see, the searched struct{} is 8 bytes in size. My hardware is a Lenovo H530 i7 4770 @3.4Ghz running Win 8.1, 64-bit MSVC compiler with full optimizations.(My CPU runs up to 3.84Ghz in Turbo mode, so if you're working with something other than an X86 CPU keep this in mind)

There are 3 interesting enhancements here:

  1. The compare function is not called via a pointer, but embedded.

  2. The core code is converted to use unsigned integer types

  3. The binary search algorithm stops when the number of probes remaining (knt) falls below the SCAN_LENGTH threshold, at which point scan_for_key() just does a linear search. That's right folks, not only does O(log n) beat O(1), but it does so by abandoning O(log n) for O(n) when n falls below SCAN_LENGTH!

The important take-away here is that complexity theory tells you what happens to performance as N changes for a given data structure, what it DOESN'T do is compare performance between different data structures. This is because it tells you how many operations will result from any given N, but it doesn't tell you how much those differing operations cost in terms of CPU and/or memory. Hash's operations are CPU and memory expensive, and Bsearch()'s are cheap, while the binary tree's are CPU cheap and memory exorbitant. The simplest proof of this is to search 10 elements. A linear search, such as I used in scan_for_key(), will be the fastest.

After embedding the compare function, number 3 is by far the most significant enhancement, and especially where N is "small". Small is relative to available L1 cache. As N gets smaller, there's more room to hold the elements that will be scanned in scan_for_key().

What makes bsearch() so fast is it's perfect memory efficiency. Unlike Hash, it needs no spare space to handle collisions, and most importantly, unlike Hash, where probes are distributed randomly in memory, bsearch()'s upper probes are ALWAYS the same.

As an example, if N is 1024, then the upper probes are ALWAYS 512,(256|768), .... You can get pretty far down into the search pattern (aka "tree", although it's a flattened tree living in an array) before you exhaust 32K of L1 cache.

If you want to see the algorithmic efficiency of bsearch() over Hash amplified, keep searching for the same key on a dataset whose N is < 1024. Bsearch runs cheap compares on cached data. Hash computes a more expensive hash value on cached data. Such retrieval patterns are somewhat common in Telco apps as people tend to re-dial the same phone number repeatedly, either because the call doesn't go though, quality is poor, or the call gets dropped.

The memory efficiency of bsearch() is best demonstrated where N is greater than 1000K. Here bsearch() eliminates 512,000 elements from consideration on the 1st probe, 256,000 on the 2nd probe, etc, etc, etc. When it gets down to the "stupid" last 5-6 probes bsearch2() calls scan_for_key() to perform linear search through adjacent elements.

As an example, with 1000K elements, Hash performance is 4.5M/second, and Bsearch2() is 29.5M/second with RAND_RANGER set to 512. By tweaking the const parameters below you can probably best Hash for nearly any N given random, clustered keys.

Lest we fail to give Hash its due, remember that with a Hash table you can update or add values in a mix of adds and retrievals - until you run out of table space. This isn't practical with Bsearch() as the array has to be sorted first. So, for OLAP data, Bsearch2() wins, but for transaction processing, it's not really a candidate(A small number of re-sorts might be tolerated, especially on small arrays, and since bsearch() lets you specify the end of the array to be searched, it's possible to allocate extra array space you use more and more of as you go along. Usually though, it's better to use hash or a binary tree)

One of the reasons I argued so strongly above that Bsearch() would be faster is because it "cheats" relative to other associative data structures by doing the work of the sort, via qsort(), up front. Therefore, at retrieval time it has less work to do. Removing the overhead of calling the compare function via pointer, and getting rid of the "stupid" probes at the end of the binary search addresses the traditional weaknesses of Bsearch() quite well.

I want to thank Olof Forshell for holding up his end of a very interesting investigation into complexity theory and its limits in the real world. It's been fun revisiting research I did 20+ years ago when writing some savagely fast DB internals.

My renewed interest in the lowly bsearch() was driven by Cliff Click's insights into the huge bottleneck main memory now represents when a cache miss costs 150-300 CPU cycles where the CPU is twiddling it's thumbs doing nothing. Bsearch() has MASSIVELY better locality than a hash function does, and the relative locality improves as N increases.

Cheers!

// define key-value pair for bsearch() approach
typedef struct {
    long key;
    long value;
    // "value" could be a very large struct{} if desired
    // int_64 SSN; // possible key as well
    // char name[31];  // possible key as well
    // char address[63];
    // double account_balance;
} KV_PAIR;

// ------------------------------------------------------------
// ------------------------------------------------------------

const time_t OUT_LOOP_KNT = 10000;
const time_t LOOP_KNT = ((1 << 14) -1);
const long RAND_RANGER = 1024;  // 25;
const unsigned long SCAN_LENGTH = 33; // generally, ((2^x) +1)

const long INCREMENT = 1;
const long DECREMENT = -1;


// ------------------------------------------------------------
inline void *scan_for_key(long key, KV_PAIR *array, unsigned long knt)
{
    long inc_dec = INCREMENT;
    if ((key - array->key) < 0)
        inc_dec = DECREMENT;

    while (knt--) {
        if (key == array->key)
            return (void *)array;
        array += inc_dec;
    }
    return (void *)NULL;
}
// ------------------------------------------------------------
void *bsearch2(long key, KV_PAIR *array, unsigned long knt)
{
    if (!(knt > 0))     // if knt not greater than zero...
        return (void *)NULL;    // return not found...

    unsigned long cond, low = 0, high = knt - 1, mid = (low + high) / 2;

    while (low <= high) {

        if ((cond = key - array[mid].key) > INT_MAX)    {   // if cond less than zero for a signed int...
            high = mid - 1;
        }   else if (cond > 0)  {
            low = mid + 1;
        }   else    {
            return &array[mid];
        }
        mid = (low + high) / 2;
        knt = knt / 2;
        if (knt < SCAN_LENGTH) {
            return scan_for_key(key, &array[mid], knt);
        }
        ////printf("\n Array[%u].Key = %u", mid, array[mid].key, array[mid].value);
    }
    return (void *)NULL;    // not found
}

The benchmark loop looks like this. As alluded to above, if you add additional members to the KV_PAIR struct{}, you can dereference them with a KV_PAIR *p pointer, as shown here. Using Bsearch2() like this will blow the doors off of any DB by 100-1,000X - especially if you're going off the back-plane to get to it.

KV_PAIR *p;
long Key, Value;
start = clock();
for (int j = 0; j<OUT_LOOP_KNT; j++) {
    for (long i = 0; i<LOOP_KNT; i++) {
        Value = ((KV_PAIR *)bsearch2(rand_srch_key[i], aSorted2, LOOP_KNT))->value;
        //p = (KV_PAIR *)bsearch2(rand_srch_key[i], aSorted2, LOOP_KNT);
        //Key = p->key;
        //Value = p->value;
        //SSN = p->SSN;  
        //Name = p->name;
        //Addr = p->address;
        //Bal  = p->account_balance;

        if (Value != rand_srch_key[i])  // assumes we've set value == key
            printf("\nError in bsearch2() with Key = %i, Value = %i", rand_srch_key[i], Value);
    }
}
etime = clock() - start;
printf("\nRetreiving  %10.2f aSorted[] nodes per second with %i array elements. Last  %i",
    ((dbl)(LOOP_KNT * OUT_LOOP_KNT * 1000.0) / (dbl)(etime)), LOOP_KNT, foo);

The purpose of RAND_RANGER is shown here. It bins random numbers into repeating values, inversely proportional to its value, to create the test keys searched for.

// create a random vector up to 32k in size
srand(1234);
long *rand_srch_key = (long *)malloc(sizeof(long) * LOOP_KNT);
for (i = 0; i < LOOP_KNT; i++) {
    rand_srch_key[i] = ((long)rand()/RAND_RANGER) % LOOP_KNT;
    //rand_srch_key[i] = i;
}

|

PS:

I've noticed when benchmarking that if I start an executable for each core, Bsearch2() maintains performance much better than the STL's hash, and on i5 and i7 CPUs, even 2 .exes running simultaneously degrades Hash significantly. Starting at (cores +1) Bsearch2() runs at ~ 75% of single .exe performance, and Hash at ~ 25%. I believe this is due to Bsearch2() being able to run out of L1 caches, one for each core, and Hash needing to dip into shared caches L2 and L3 substantially. This is because even adjacent keys will Hash to very different memory locations.

share|improve this answer
    
Did some benchmarking on a new Celeron machine. Bsearch2() runs about 3x as fast as Hash for 1 .exe and 5-10X as fast with many competing .exe running. In fact, Bsearch2() shows only minor degregation while another Hash is running, while 2 Hashes really bog the machine. It surprised me that the divergence in relative performance of the two approaches increased dramatically when moving to a less capable platform. RX anyone deciding which to use benchmark on their particular platform. –  RocketRoy Oct 21 at 22:10

You need to store 16 thousand values efficiently, preferably in memory. We are assuming that the computation of these values is more time consuming than accessing them from storage.

You have at your disposal many different data structures to get the job done, including databases. If you access these values in queriable chunks, then the DB overhead may very well be absorbed and spread accross your processing.

You mentioned map and hashmap (or hashtable) already in your question tags, but these are probably not the best possible answers for your problem, although they could do a fair job, provided that the hashing function isn't more expensive than the direct computation of the target UINT64 value, which has to be your reference benchmark.

Are probably much better suited. Having some experience with it, I would probably go for a B-tree: they support fairly well serialization. That should let you prepare your dataset in advance in a different program. VEB trees have a very good access time (O(log log(n)), but I don't know how easily they may be serialized.

Later on, if you need even more performance, it would also be interesting to know usage patterns of your "database" to figure out what caching techniques you could implement on top of the store.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer is clearly incorrect. Trees are wonderful things, but completely inappropriate where you know how many entries you need to store in advance. Their advantage is they are self-extending. They are expensive though, and take up a lot of memory. Hash or bsearch() are the correct answers. Databases are too slow by many thousands of times. –  RocketRoy Dec 16 '12 at 7:15
    
@RocketRoy databases ate slow because they need to parse and complie high level language queries (SQL like), but when it comes to indexing, the algorithms they use are fast enough. The problem is to find a good tradeof between speed and ease of use, and b-trees are good candidates for that. –  didierc Dec 16 '12 at 16:13
    
@RocketRoy thank you for your kind advices. I'd never used bsearch before, and it seems a very handy function to do dichotomic search on a sorted array. Now may I kindly suggest that you do the same and educate yourself on what a B-tree exaclty is? And I am not talking about binary trees. –  didierc Dec 17 '12 at 8:42
    
You have no way to access the internals of the database, and even if you did, B-trees are used for retrieving blocks of data off of disk, 10 yrs ago 16k blocks, and now 64k blocks, or even larger. The base of the block is navigated to just like a binary tree, but inside the block data is found by doing a linear search. IE: an element by element comparison. This slows them down to a crawl relative to entirely memory-based data structures, but is faster for disk-based as it reduces the number of disk searches for any given number of entries. –  RocketRoy Oct 9 at 7:57
    
A better compromise, given that the OP knows the number of entries up front, is to put the sorted array on disk and just do the probes against the disk. As the probes in the upper part of the search are always the same, they get cached, so this is surprisingly fast and extremely memory efficient. Using memory-mapped files increases performance substantially as the upper probes in many simultaneous searches are able to use the CPU's MMU to intelligently cache probes. I wrote a rather extensive OLAP DB using this approach and was very happy with performance and maintenance. –  RocketRoy Oct 9 at 8:03

Perform memonization, or in simple terms, cache the values you've computed already and calculate the new ones. You should hash the input and check the cache for that result. You can even start off with a set of cache values that you think the function would get called more often for. Besides that, I don't think you need to go to any extreme as the other answer suggest. Do things simple and when you are done with your application you can use a profiling tool to find bottle necks.

EDIT: Some code

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

const int MAX_SIZE = 16000;

int preCalcData[MAX_SIZE] = {};

int getPrecalculatedResult(int x){
 return preCalcData[x];
}

void setupPreCalcDataCache(){
  for(int i = 0; i < MAX_SIZE; ++i){
    preCalcData[i] = i*i; //or whatever calculation
  }
}

int main(){
  setupPreCalcDataCache();

  cout << getPrecalculatedResult(0) << endl;
  cout << getPrecalculatedResult(15999) << endl;

  return 0;
}    
share|improve this answer
    
Well OP doesn't necessarily need to convert the numerical value to string in order to get a hash? I think this should be faster than the binary search method –  user814628 Dec 17 '12 at 20:37
    
Asking a Hash function "have I already done this" 16,000 times cannot possibly be faster than already knowing you have. Read the OP's spec. It's a completely redundant question. For the Nth time, Hashing CAN be faster than searching, but unless you know a lot about the data, and know it's size, it seldom is because most data has hot-spots that create cascading collisions. It's nearly impossible to create a perfect Hash function. Conjecture is useless. FASTER can only be answered by benchmarking. Provide some code and we'll know. –  RocketRoy Dec 21 '12 at 8:11
    
To already know you have hashed you have to ask first right? Anyways, if we can spare memory then it will be a constant lookup and code will be very trivial. I say it is feasible in terms of memory because it is only 16000 ints. So as a result, we can simply do CALC[x] and not even hash x. Maybe I am missing something here. –  user814628 Dec 21 '12 at 19:05
    
Made edit to post. It should be simple as that, since the space needed for this problem is relatively small. –  user814628 Dec 22 '12 at 3:12
    
From the OP's list of assumptions... "Now, given that I know ALL possible inputs (the xs) of that function beforehand". Given this, there is no need to compute values on the fly. Just compute them all up front and retrieve them as fast as possible at run-time. –  RocketRoy Oct 18 at 1:13

Using std::pair is better than any of map for speed.

but if I were you, I firstly use a std::list to store the data, after I got them all, I move them into a simple vector, then retrieving goes very fast if you implement a simple binary tree search by yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
There is absolutely no reason to use a list, which has the worst performance of any data-structure for this problem. The OP made it VERY clear he knows all the keys up front. Just allocate a vector, or use push_back() if you must, and be done with it. DS&A 101. Also, pair is a tupple/struct{}, it has no implication for speed. It is irrelavant whether you search a pair or a struct{}, as internally they're treated the same and take up the exact same storage. –  RocketRoy Oct 20 at 2:37
    
I saw some really good answers here, I guess I didn't see the OP's supplement when he opened this question at the first place, there are lots to learn for me here. –  tomriddle_1234 Oct 20 at 6:52
    
Yes, I agree. A lot of thinking went into the answers on this question. IE: it occurred to me that bsearch() could handle keys like SSN or phone number by creating a struct{int_64 SSN_Key:34; int_64 Value:20;} where 34 bits will cover 0-9,999,999,999 and 20 bits is enough room for the user's value/s - like a short and a char, or truncated long int. Finally, imagine you have big records on disk, and just want to bsearch() the key column. If you subtract the returned ptr from the base of the index array you get the corresponding record number on disk with just a key, not a key|value pair. –  RocketRoy Oct 20 at 16:34
    
I got to leave my fault answer here, to make your effort. –  tomriddle_1234 Oct 22 at 1:45

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