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I'm trying to add something to Form1's listbox using another class. How do I do that?

This is my current code:

Form1.cs

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    public void writeTest(string items)
    {
        this.listBox1.Items.Add(items);
    }
}

Test.cs

class Test
{
    Form1 frm1 = new Form1();

    public void test()
    {
        frm1.writeTest("Hello");
    }
}
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What is wrong with your current code? –  hattenn Dec 16 '12 at 5:52
    
Is Form1 your Startup Form? –  Mark Hall Dec 16 '12 at 5:55

3 Answers 3

Where does the "Test" class come from? I'm going to assume it's created within Form1. You can pass a reference of Form1 to Test while creating it. For instance:

public Form1() {
  test = new Test(this);
}


class Test {
  private Form1 form;
  public Test(Form1 f) {
    form = f;
  }
  ...

then, you have access to the form from within Test.

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Test class isn't inside Form1, but I'll try your code and modify it. Thanks! –  user1621338 Dec 16 '12 at 6:00
    
Where exactly is Test class? It doesn't matter much as long as the class that the method is in is called from another thread. –  hattenn Dec 16 '12 at 6:04

Your example results in very high coupling. This is something you do not want. There are various techniques you can use. To start with you could look at the SOLID principles (if you haven't done so): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOLID_%28object-oriented_design%29

In particular the D part (dependency inversion). So in your example you could have some interface called IAddTestItem with a method called AddTestItem. However, this still probably is not ideal.

I suspect you would gain more by employing a messaging mechanism of sorts (observer pattern). So you could have some shared (injected) instance of a MessageBus. Both your form and your class could receive the same instance using something like dependency injection (but other mechanism can be used). Your class could then publish some message like AddTestItem (more of a command) or even TestItemAdded if it is simply to inform any listeners that the event has occurred and they are free to use the data how they see fit: such as adding to a list box.

But you definitely will run into maintenance issues if you do not decouple your code somehow.

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This is example of version of Strategy pattern. Here we use mediator, which controls loading of listbox.

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private IMediator _mediator; // any class deriving from IMediator 

    public Form1(IMediator mediator)
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        _mediator = mediator;
        LoadList();
    }

    private void LoadList()
    {
        // in strategy you might supply different mediators, each may load listbox with different type of items. You pass reference to your control. Load logic is totally up to the external class, such as mediator.
        _mediator.LoadList(this.listBox1);
    }
 }

This is example of loading control using different class within pattern

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