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I have a file dummy.txt containing this:

"my_server"\1\"n9j7gd8kl4"
"widget"\1\"vnhck67hn"
"other_server"\1\"tbone"
"blah"\1\"n9j7gd8kl4"
"server_new"\1\"g54"
"genserver"\1\"vf45s"
"prd+other_server"\1\"f"\"jh34t"
"test_blah"\1\"tbone"

I need to change it to this with a generic-like one-liner in Solaris (can anyone please help?):

"my_server"\1\"tbone"
"widget"\1\"vnhck67hn"
"other_server"\1\"tbone"
"blah"\1\"n9j7gd8kl4"
"server_new"\1\"tbone"
"genserver"\1\"tbone"
"prd+other_server"\1\"f"\"jh34t"
"test_blah"\1\"tbone"

ie. For every line that has the string 'server' within the first double quotes and the line is in the format "string1"\1\"string2" then change the value of string2 to 'tbone'

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will need to ignore lines that have \ or " within the string1 or string2 –  toop Dec 16 '12 at 6:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
sed 's/^\("[^"]*server[^"]*"\\1\\\)".*"$/\1"tbone"/'

This allows 'server' to appear anywhere within the first string, not just at the end as in all the examples. If you only want it at the end, omit the second [^"]*.

Oh, and to deal with the 'no double quotes or backslashes' requirement:

sed 's/^\("[^\\"]*server[^\\"]*"\\1\\\)"[^\\"]*"$/\1"tbone"/'

The difference is the backslashes in the negated character classes.

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how would you use this to modify part of the file in place? ie modify all lines from: $(cat dummy.txt | grep -v ne | tail -4). I know cat dummy.txt | grep -v ne | tail -4 |sed -i 's/^("[^\\"]*server[^\\"]*"\\1\\)"[^\\"]*"$/\1"tbone"/' won't work –  toop Dec 17 '12 at 11:28
    
On Solaris, I'd use grep -v ne dummy.txt | ... | sed ... >dummy.new; mv dummy.new dummy.txt, or something equivalent. In a script, I'd use traps and a unique intermediate file name to ensure that there aren't concurrency problems. If the file might be multiply linked or a symlink, then the final mv needs to become cp plus rm, etc. But basically, you filter the input to a file and then copy/move the file to the input. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 17 '12 at 14:23
    
But wouldn't that mean the new file will not contain any lines that didn't meet the grep/tail? –  toop Dec 22 '12 at 1:47
    
I've lost track of what you're asking. You need to ask a new question, with sample inputs and outputs. You can limit the range of lines that sed operates on, by number or by pattern (or a combination). –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 22 '12 at 3:05
cat dummy.txt | perl -pe 's{ ^ (" [^"\\]* server [^"\\]* " \\1 \\") [^"\\]+ " $}{${1}tbone"}xms;'

The Perl version is slightly more readable.

share|improve this answer
    
how would you use this to modify part of the file in place? ie modify all lines from: $(cat dummy.txt | grep -v ne | tail -4). I know cat dummy.txt | grep -v ne | tail -4 |sed -i 's/^("[^\\"]*server[^\\"]*"\\1\\)"[^\\"]*"$/\1"tbone"/' won't work –  toop Dec 17 '12 at 11:28

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