Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I will post my code and explain after, I'm new to all of this so bare with me:

db = sqlite3.connect("Gene.sqlite")
cur = db.cursor()
cur.execute("SELECT * FROM Table")
for i in cur.fetchall():
    if i[0] == name:
    print '<br>' '<c><b>TYPE'':</b>' ' '+ i[1]+ '<br>'\
    '<b>DESCRIPTION:</b></c>' ' '+ i[2]
    break
else:
    print 'This name does no exist in the Database'

This is in python and I am creating a CGI script where the user inputs a name, and my script goes into that database, searches for the name and prints out the row for that name. I have a database with a table called Table with thousands of names, I just want the user to input a name, and have it search through the table, and find one single name that matches the input, and if the name exists, print the necessary information (as shown). However, for every name that does not match, it prints This name does not exist until it finds a match, and if a match isn't found, i just get thousands of messages saying "this name does not exist". Basically, I want it to search the table without printing anything UNTIL it finds the name, and if it finds the name, prints out the information, and if it does not exist, just print once "This name does not exist int the database".

share|improve this question
    
Head of the 'WHERE' clause in SQL? –  Andreas Jung Dec 16 '12 at 8:08
    
And why i[0]? Who guarantees that i[0] is always the field what you are looking for??? –  Andreas Jung Dec 16 '12 at 8:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to use a WHERE clause:

db = sqlite3.connect("Gene.sqlite")
cur = db.cursor()
looking_for = 'hello'
cur.execute("SELECT type,description FROM Table WHERE name = '%s'", (looking_for,))
for i in cur.fetchall():
    result = '<br><c><b>TYPE:</b> {}<br><b>DESCRIPTION:</b></c> {}'
    print result.format(*i)
else:
    print '{} does not exist in the Database'.format(looking_for)
share|improve this answer
1  
Also adding a 'limit 1' / 'top 1' will stop on the first match. –  threenplusone Dec 16 '12 at 8:12

As Burhan Khalid answered, you could do that inside SQL, which is preferable and faster. But just for completeness sake, if you like to move logic from SQL zone to Python zone, as you did, that should work too. I believe the problem in your code is that the name field is not the index-0 one. Try printing i[0], i[1], i[2] and check whether this is the case.

Now, referring to columns can be done also by field name, so you could change your code to:

if i["name"] == name:

without counting on an index, and thus have a more robust logic.

share|improve this answer

Every database support the SQL 'LIMIT' keyword in to limit the size of the result set. That's the way to go instead of looping over a possible large result set. So your approach is broken. Fix your query instead of tinkering a workaround. And of course apart from that: include the 'name' with your query.

share|improve this answer

I think the issue is a whitespace issue.

Try this

for i in cur.fetchall():
  if i[0] == name:
    print '<br>' '<c><b>TYPE'':</b>' ' '+ i[1]+ '<br>'\
      '<b>DESCRIPTION:</b></c>' ' '+ i[2]
    break
else:
  print 'This name does no exist in the Database'

Also, are you missing a '+' at the broken line?

share|improve this answer
    
thanks will try it now, and i don't think i'm missing a +, last i checked it printed out properly (for what it is) but i'll double check. It worked, still learning how if/else loops work so I feel pretty dumb that the else statement was spaced a bit too far =\ THANKS! –  Dominic Balcon Dec 16 '12 at 8:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.