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I have a design level doubt regarding creating APIs in Java. Suppose I have a class as follows :-

class Test
{
  public final static String DEFAULT_ENCODING = "utf-8";

  public byte[] encodeIt(String input)
  {
    try {
      return input.getBytes(DEFAULT_ENCODING);
    } catch(UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
      // do something
    }
  }
}

I know that the UnsupportedEncodingException would never arise as I'm using a static string as the input to toBytes. It doesn't make sense to have encodeIt do a throws UnsupportedEncodingException because I dont wish the API users to expect and catch that error either.

In such cases, is the best practice to have an empty catch block?

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your DEFAULT_ENCODING is not final, so it could change and the exception would be thrown. –  jlordo Dec 16 '12 at 10:30
    
My bad -- I've made the edit –  uki Dec 16 '12 at 10:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is a bad idea to have empty catch blocks. Even though your reasoning seems correct this design will at some stage cause you endless debugging and searching once exceptions do start happening and your code is swallowing them. I would wrap your exception in a RuntimeException here and throw that. Like so:

public encodeIt(String input)
  {
    try {
      return input.getBytes(DEFAULT_ENCODING);
    catch(UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
      throw new RuntimeException(e);
    }
  }

This way your exception will not stay hidden might it occur nor do your API users have to cater for it.

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I do something like this:

public byte[] encodeIt(String input) {
    try {
        return input.getBytes(DEFAULT_ENCODING);
    }
    catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
        throw new ShouldNeverHappenException(e);
        // or: throw new IllegalStateException(e);
    }
}

(where ShouldNeverHappenException is a runtime exception, of course).

This way, if someone happens to change the constant value, or add an encoding argument, the method will fail fast and the problem will not go unnoticed or buried in log files.

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In such cases, is the best practice to have an empty catch block?

I don't feel that's a good idea, ever. Empty catch blocks mean that something could happen and you'll never know.

Don't throw this exception. Catch it and log it so you can check your assumption that it can never happen, but at least you'll know if never arrives.

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I usually follow the strategies outlined by other answers to this question (like soften the checked exception to RuntimeException). However, one interesting alternative is to use an assertion:

public byte[] encodeIt(String input)
{
  try {
    return input.getBytes(DEFAULT_ENCODING);
  } catch(UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
    assert false;
    return null;
  }
}

When assertions are enabled with the -ea JVM flag, this method would throw an AssertionError if ever UnsupportedEncodingException were thrown. An annoyance is the need to return a value (such as null), otherwise the code won't compile.

So perhaps the following is "nicer":

public byte[] encodeIt(String input)
{
  try {
    return input.getBytes(DEFAULT_ENCODING);
  } catch(UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
    throw new AssertionError("Unexpected.", e);
  }
}

Not so materially different than throwing RuntimeException except that AssertionError is nicely self-documenting. And, being a subclass of Error, it represents a more fundamental failure than Exception normally implies. No chance for a catch (Exception e) clause somewhere higher up on the stack handling this thing (were it to ever occur).

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The best way I think is to avoid checked exception. Just use an unchecked one. Then you will take the best of 2 worlds: you do will signal the error if it really happens and you won't force the user of your API to handle the exception.

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If you are very, very sure that it would never happen, leave an empty catch block. But for practice, just in case you change the code later on, it is better to log it to the console when the exception happens.

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