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I need to count the number of elements corresponding to the intersection of two big arrays of strings and do it very fast.

I am using the following code:

arr1[i].Intersect(arr2[j]).Count()

For CPU Time, VS Profiler indicates

  • 85.1% in System.Linq.Enumerable.Count()
  • 0.3% in System.Linq.Enumerable.Intersect()

Unfortunately it might to take hours to do all work.

How to do it faster?

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2  
The numbers you got from the profiler are propably not "correct". Because the Intersect is not executed when you say .Intersect(), the whole query is exeuted when you say .Count(). That's the nature of LINQ. I suspect there is more work to be done when intersecting than when counting. If you really need performance on this one, try to do it without LINQ. –  cpt. jazz Dec 16 '12 at 10:52
2  
How big is "big" ? –  driis Dec 16 '12 at 10:54
    
If it's big enough, put it in a database, or create a cluster of computers/threads, maybe do some MapReduce.. –  Kieren Johnstone Dec 16 '12 at 10:56
    
Are you intersecting the strings in the arr1 and arr2 or each character from each string in arr1 vs. each character from each string in arr2? –  Alex Filipovici Dec 16 '12 at 11:03
    
I hardly think this is your bottleneck. In my tests Intersect+Count on 2 arrays of 5 millions of strings (avg.length=60 char) takes ~3.5 seconds... How big are your arrays ? –  digEmAll Dec 16 '12 at 12:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use HashSet with arr2

HashSet<string> arr2Set = new HashSet<string>(arr2);
arr1.Where(x=>arr2Set.Contains(x)).Count();
              ------------------
                      |
                      |->HashSet's contains method executes quickly using hash-based lookup..

Not considering the conversion from arr2 to arr2Set ,this should be O(n)

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This is the Best Way ! the most efficient. This method is for Instersect. Is it possible to use the same principle for Union? –  LeMoussel Dec 17 '12 at 6:30
    
This gives incorrect answers in the case where arr1 contains duplicate strings which also have duplicates in arr2. You'd need Where(x => arr2Set.Remove(x)). –  Rawling Dec 18 '12 at 8:49
    
Also, this Contains version ends up slower if the arrays get larger - but the version with Remove does seem to stay faster. –  Rawling Dec 18 '12 at 8:57

I suspect the reason why the profiler shows the time being consumed in Count, is that this is where the collection is actually enumerated (the Intersect is lazily evaluated and does not run before you need the result).

I believe Intersect should have some internal optimizations to make this reasonably fast, but you could try using a HashSet<string> so you are sure the intersect can be made without searching through the inner array for each element:

HashSet<string> set = new HashSet<string>(arr1);
set.IntersectWith(arr2);
int count = set.Count;
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Bizarrely, in my test this ended up slower than both the original and my corrected version of Some1's answer, when I would've expected it to be great. –  Rawling Dec 18 '12 at 9:01

Hmmm Intersect is probably N^2

to make it faster quicksort both arrays. and than traverse both arrays. counting intersections.

too lazy to test how fast it would be but should O(nlogn +n)

    using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Test
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            const int arrsize = 1000000;
            Random rnd = new Random(42);
            string[] arr1 = new string[arrsize];
            string[] arr2 = new string[arrsize];
            for (int i = 0; i < arrsize; i++)
            {
                arr1[i] = rnd.Next().ToString();
                arr2[i] = rnd.Next().ToString();
            }
            {
                var stamp = (System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp());
                arr1.Intersect(arr2).Count();
                Console.WriteLine("array" + (System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp() - stamp));
            }

        {

            HashSet<string> set = new HashSet<string>(arr1);
            var stamp = (System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp());
            set.IntersectWith(arr2);
            int count = set.Count;
            Console.WriteLine("HashSet" + (System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp() - stamp));
        }
            {
               var stamp = (System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp());
                HashSet<string> set = new HashSet<string>(arr1);
                set.IntersectWith(arr2);
                int count = set.Count;
                Console.WriteLine("HashSet + new" + (System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp() - stamp));
            }

            {
                var stamp = (System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp());
                SortedSet<string> set = new SortedSet<string>(arr1);
                set.IntersectWith(arr2);
                int count = set.Count;
                Console.WriteLine("SortedSet +new " + (System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp() - stamp));
            }

            {

                SortedSet<string> set = new SortedSet<string>(arr1);
                var stamp = (System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp());
                set.IntersectWith(arr2);
                int count = set.Count;
                Console.WriteLine("SortedSet without new " + (System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.GetTimestamp() - stamp));
            }
        }
    }
}

results

array 914,637

HashSet 816,119

HashSet +new 1,150,978

SortedSet +new 16,173,836

SortedSet without new 7,946,709

so seems that best way is to keep a ready hash set.

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Intersect in the linq extension is implemented O(n log n) –  user287107 Dec 16 '12 at 11:08
    
Intersect in HashSet is also implemented O(n log n), just looked in the disassembly –  user287107 Dec 16 '12 at 11:10
    
@user287107: that's not true. Both Intersect and HashSet use hash tables and so hashset is asymptotically O(1) and intersect is O(n). Of course sometimes O(logn) complexity could be faster (it depends on gethashcode implementation, buckets and other factor), but they're not implemented using binarytrees or something with O(logn) complexity. –  digEmAll Dec 16 '12 at 11:14
    
@user287107: c-sharp-snippets.blogspot.it/2010/03/… –  digEmAll Dec 16 '12 at 11:18
    
I know it could be faster, but just take a look at the implementation of the IntersectIterator class. the iterator does the following 1) create new set, 2) iterate through source1, add items to set 3) iterate through source2, if remove is successfull, yield return the element. the adding and removing is O(log n), and by the loop it is O(n log n) –  user287107 Dec 16 '12 at 11:19

when you are working with sets, your complexity will be O((n log n)*(m log m)) or so,

i think this here should be faster, but i'm not sure if it is now O((n log n)+(m log m))

possible would be 
var Set1 = arr1[i].Distinct().ToArray(); // if necessary, if arr1 or arr2 could be not distinct
var Set2 = arr2[j].Distinct().ToArray();  

nCount = Set1.Count() + Set2.Count() - Set1.Append(Set2).Distinct().Count();
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Build a HashSet using the smaller array and then loop through the bigger one, incrementing a counter if the item it exists in the hashset.

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