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Okay, so I have the following little function:

def swap(inp):
    inp = inp.split()
    out = ""

    for item in inp:
        ind  = inp.index(item)
        item = item.replace("i am",    "you are")
        item = item.replace("you are", "I am")
        item = item.replace("i'm",     "you're")
        item = item.replace("you're",  "I'm")
        item = item.replace("my",      "your")
        item = item.replace("your",    "my")
        item = item.replace("you",     "I")
        item = item.replace("my",      "your")
        item = item.replace("i",       "you")
        inp[ind] = item

    for item in inp:
        ind  = inp.index(item)
        item = item + " "
        inp[ind] = item

    return out.join(inp)

Which, while it's not particularly efficient gets the job done for shorter sentences. Basically, all it does is swaps pronoun etc. perspectives. This is fine when I throw a string like "I love you" at it, it returns "you love me" but when I throw something like:

you love your version of my couch because I love you, and you're a couch-lover.

I get:

I love your versyouon of your couch because I love I, and I'm a couch-lover. 

I'm confused as to why this is happening. I explicitly split the string into a list to avoid this. Why would it be able to detect it as being a part of a list item, rather than just an exact match?

Also, slightly deviating to avoid having to post another question so similar; if a solution to this breaks this function, what will happen to commas, full stops, other punctuation?

It made some very surprising mistakes. My expected output is:

I love my version of your couch because you love I, and I'm a couch-lover.

The reason I formatted it like this, is because I eventually hope to be able to replace the item.replace(x, y) variables with words in a database.

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1  
You may have to split it to a list, but "version" will be one of those list elements, and then you replace "i" with "you" in it... –  Jon Clements Dec 16 '12 at 10:54

3 Answers 3

For this specific problem you need regular expressions. Basically, along the lines of:

table = [
    ("I am", "you are"),
    ("I'm",  "you're"),
    ("my",   "your"),
    ("I",    "you"),
]

import re

def swap(s):
    dct = dict(table)
    dct.update((y, x) for x, y in table)
    return re.sub(
        '|'.join(r'(?:\b%s\b)' % x for x in dct),
        lambda m: dct[m.group(0)], 
        s)

print swap("you love your version of my couch because I love you, and you're a couch-lover.")
# I love my version of your couch because you love I, and I'm a couch-lover.

But in general, natural language processing by the means of string/re functions is naive at best (note "you love I" above).

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Heres a simple code:

def swap(inp):
    inp = inp.split()
    out = []
    d1 = ['i am', 'you are', 'i\'m', 'you\'re', 'my', 'your', 'I', 'my', 'you']
    d2 = ['you are', 'I am', 'you\'re', 'I\'m', 'your', 'my', 'you', 'your', 'I']
    for item in inp:
        itm = item.replace(',','')
        if itm not in d1:
            out.append(item)
        else: out.append(d2[d1.index(itm)])
    return ' '.join(out)

    print(swap('you love your version of my couch because I love you, and you\'re a couch-lover.'))
share|improve this answer

The problem is that both index() and replace() works with substrings (in your case, sub-words).

Take a look at my answer to another question: String replacement with dictionary, complications with punctuation

The code in that answer can be used to solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way around this? –  abkai Dec 16 '12 at 10:56
    
@abkai: Yes - see the update. –  NPE Dec 16 '12 at 11:02

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