Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Strings in Java : equals vs ==

Consider the following program :

    public class Test {

    public static void main (String [] args){

        MyString s = new MyString("toto");
        MyString s1 = new MyString("toto");

        String s2 = "toto";
        String s3 = "toto";
        System.out.println(s==s1);  
        System.out.println(s2==s3); 
    }
}

class MyString{

    private String s;

    public MyString (String s){
        this.s = s;
    }
}

It prints this result :

false 
true

Why the first result is false ? I understood that for none primitive types, when we do '==', Java compares if the two objects are pointing in the same memory emplacement. So I assume that in my memory, I actually have a memory emplacement where the String "toto" is stocked and s2 and s3 contains the adress of this memory emplacement ??

So why this is false for my MyString objects ?

Thanks

EDIT : The purpose of this question wasn't how to compare the content of two Strings (using or redefine equals for my own classes).

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by duffymo, DarkCthulhu, Jan Dvorak, AmitD, Marko Topolnik Dec 16 '12 at 12:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I hope this is the last time this question is asked before doomsday ;) –  AmitD Dec 16 '12 at 11:51
    
@AmitD Please, no! That would mean the doomsday is nigh! –  Marko Topolnik Dec 16 '12 at 12:05

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When comparing s == s1 you are comparing two different MyString objects. Think of your situation like this

enter image description here

s and s1 are different objects, but their attribute point to the same instance of toto.

They are different objects because of the way you create them:

MyString s = new MyString("toto");
MyString s1 = new MyString("toto");

So s == s1 will return false. For it to return true, they had to be the same object. You could achieve it like this:

MyString s = new MyString("toto");
MyString s1 = s;

That would be the result

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Basically when you use new String("something") you're forcing Java to create a brand new object.

When you assign to a String literal ="something", that string is stored in the constant pool, an optimization done by the JVM. So when you assign another reference to the same constant, the Object stored in the constant pool gets reused, basically, it's the same object.

share|improve this answer
2  
Note: You should not rely on this feature, it's just implementation detail. Always compare using "foo".equals(otherString); –  Ondra Žižka Dec 16 '12 at 11:45
    
@OndraŽižka Can you point to the JLS? I think it's actually guaranteed. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 16 '12 at 11:46
    
Thanks for your reply, good mention to point the optimization done by the JVM. –  ZouZou Dec 16 '12 at 11:56
    
AFAIK it's not, the strings internation works up to length of 6, or so, in current Oracle JVMs. Not sure. And, you have to consider various libs like JavaAssist, ByteMan etc. which may fiddle with the strings as well. Relying on == with strings can only bring troubles. –  Ondra Žižka Dec 16 '12 at 12:02
    
Info: "All literal strings and string-valued constant expressions are interned. String literals are defined in §3.10.5 of the JLS". And also here –  Ondra Žižka Dec 16 '12 at 12:05

Why the first result is false ?

== compares references and you create two different objects.

I understood that for none primitive types, when we do '==',

A String is not a primitive. References will be == when they refer to the same object.

share|improve this answer

Only interned (String.intern()) strings are safe to compare with == for all other cases you should use equals.

In your case you define your own type MyString which has small in common with java String so comparing s and s1 you compare references to two distinct objects that is why you got false.

share|improve this answer

Every instance of MyString sits in a different memory location, so, forgetting about the contents of the instances, for every two different instances the == test is going to result in false.

In case of the String class, there's a small, but important difference, when you do assignment of a String variable and the right hand side operator is a literal (i.e. String s = "foo";), a new memory location is going to be occupied by "foo" only if "foo" was not encountered before as a literal. If this is the case (i.e. String s = "foo"; String otherS = "foo";), otherS is just going to reference the already present "foo".

This behaviour is called String pooling.

share|improve this answer

When you use == on strings, only the references are compared. Thus, == is only guaranteed to return true in situations like:

String s1 = "...";
String s2 = s1;    // reference assignment!

Here, s1 == s2. In all other situations, == may or may not return true even if the two strings contain the same character sequence.

To compare the contents of the two strings, use equals():

if (s1.equals(s2)) {
   ...
}
share|improve this answer

The reason for the first comparison to fail is, that you do create two Objects by calling new. Now, the == operator does compare two memory addresses, which yields the return you got because the two objects are not at the same memory cell.

The reason why it works with constant Strings is, that the java compiler, javac, does optimize the code. By that optimisation similar string constants are being placed in one and the same memory cell. If you would have done the following, then the result would have been the same for your String objects.

String s2 = new String("toto");
String s3 = new String("toto");
System.out.println(s2==s3); //yields false!!

Your way to go is .equals(other). For that you'll have to implement the method equals in the class Mystring:

class MyString{

    private String s;

    public MyString (String s){
        this.s = s;
    }

    public String getContent(){
        return s;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object other){
        if(other instanceof MyString){
            MyString compareTo = (MyString) other;
            return this.s.equals(compareTo.getContent());
        }
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.