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Since code speaks better than words, would you use this:

struct StringEvent
{
    const void* source;
    const std::string str;

    StringEvent(const void* source, const std::string& str)
        : source(source), str(str) 
    { }
};

class StringEventListener
{
public:
    virtual void handler(const StringEvent& event) = 0;
}

class Test : public StringEventListener
{
public:
    void handler(const StringEvent& event) 
    { 
        std::cout << event.str << std::endl; 
    }
}

class EventSource
{
public:
    EventSource(StringEventListener* listener) 
    { 
        listener->handler(StringEvent(this, std::string("foo"))); 
    } 
}

int main()
{
    Test test;

    EventSource(&test);
}

over this?

class Test 
{
public:
    void handler(const std::string& str) 
    { 
        std::cout << str << std::endl; 
    }
};

class EventSource
{
public:
    EventSource(const boost::function<void (const std::string&)>& funcPtr)
    {
        funcPtr(std::string("foo"));
    }
};

int main()
{
    Test test;

    EventSource(boost::bind(&Test::handler, &test, _1));
}

to make the class EventSource call test.handler("foo")?

Coming from the Java/C# world I find the first approach more intuitive, albeit verbose, but is it reccomanded to use in real-life situations, or does it cause more problems than it's worth/performance hits?

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closed as not constructive by KillianDS, Bill the Lizard Dec 16 '12 at 15:44

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would absolutely not use the first version. That's terrible. The second version is far superior- it can be lambdas and whatnot as well.

Also, boost::function is not a function pointer.

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+1 -For an answer without hesitation that i agree with) –  SChepurin Dec 16 '12 at 13:46
2  
Would you please care to elaborate why the first approach would be terrible? –  silverhx Dec 16 '12 at 14:16
1  
You're wasting your life defining an infinity of new classes that all do the same thing. Instead, you could just not define a class at all and use a lambda. –  Puppy Dec 16 '12 at 14:25

IMO you can use 'functors' (Objects with static methods) with Boost/C++ than the full blown object to hold callback data, and a callback object (in your former example).

It's a matter of style, and if you need objects to pass data around.

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1  
Functors are not objects with static methods. Functors are objects with operator(). –  Puppy Dec 16 '12 at 14:24
    
Where can I learn more about your definition of Functor? –  Arcturus Dec 16 '12 at 16:07
    

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