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I have two classes, A and B like this :

class A
{
public:
    A(int i)
    {
        this->i = i;
    }
private:
    int i;
};

class B
{
public:
    B()
    {
        i = 0;
        a = new A(i);
        i++;
        // i = 1
        // a->i must be 1
    }

private:
    A* a;
    int i;
};

I tri to share a member between the two objects. I want when i is modified in B, i have to be modified in A. How can I doing something like that ? It is possible by reference ? I hope I was clear. Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, it's possible by reference, but then you run into scoping issues.

You can also have a std::shared_ptr to share variables between classes.

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I used a std::shared_ptr as you said. It work fine, thanks –  flow Dec 16 '12 at 14:41

Without creating a cyclic dependency you need a third object (you can use the address of something if you want) that is shared/known to both classes.

While I prefer reference to pointers in many cases I tend to avoid references because they are not necessarily good candidates for sharing data when the life-time of the shared object is hard to decide over. A std::shared_ptr might be a good fit.

Though, it might also be as simple as

int x;
A* a = new A(&x);
B* b = new B(&x);

However, in this example a reference is more appropriate but given that the scope here doesn't say anything about the life-time of a and b I'd go with all heap and a shared_ptr to not stumble on the problem of who will delete the shared memory?...

#include <memory>
auto x = std::make_shared<int>(0);
A* a = new A(x);
B* b = new B(x);
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Like Luchian said, you need to be careful of scope and the lifetime of the variable that you're referencing. In your example as long as B never outlives A you would be fine.

class A
{
public:
    A(int &i) : m_i(i)
    {
    }
private:
    int &m_i;
};

class B
{
public:
    B()
    {
        i = 0;
        a = new A(i);
        i++;
        // i = 1
        // a->i must be 1
    }

private:
    A* a;
    int i;
};
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