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I have written a quicksort (method quicksortF()) that uses a Scala's Future to let the recursive sorting of the partitions be done concurrently. I also have implemented a regular quicksort (method quicksort()). Unfortunately, the Future version ends up in a deadlock (apparently blocks forever) when the list to sort is greater than about 1000 elements (900 would work). The source is shown below.

I am relatively new to Actors and Futures. What is goind wrong here?

Thanks!

import util.Random
import actors.Futures._

/**
 * Quicksort with and without using the Future pattern.
 * @author Markus Gumbel
 */
object FutureQuickSortProblem {

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val n = 1000 // works for n = 900 but not for 1000 anymore.

    // Create a random list of size n:
    val list = (1 to n).map(c => Random.nextInt(n * 10)).toList
    println(list)
    // Sort it with regular quicksort:
    val sortedList = quicksort(list)
    println(sortedList)
    // ... and with quicksort using Future (which hangs):
    val sortedListF = quicksortF(list)
    println(sortedListF)
  }

  // This one works.
  def quicksort(list: List[Int]): List[Int] = {
    if (list.length <= 1) list
    else {
      val pivot = list.head
      val leftList = list.filter(_ < pivot)
      val middleList = list.filter(pivot == _)
      val rightList = list.filter(_ > pivot)

      val sortedLeftList = quicksort(leftList)
      val sortedRightList = quicksort(rightList)
      sortedLeftList ::: middleList ::: sortedRightList
    }
  }

  // Almost the same as quicksort() except that Future is used.
  // However, this one hangs.
  def quicksortF(list: List[Int]): List[Int] = {

    if (list.length <= 1) list
    else {
      val pivot = list.head
      val leftList = list.filter(_ < pivot)
      val middleList = list.filter(pivot == _)
      val rightList = list.filter(_ > pivot)

      // Same as quicksort() but here we are using a Future
      // to sort the left and right partitions independently:
      val sortedLeftListFuture = future {
        quicksortF(leftList)
      }
      val sortedRightListFuture = future {
        quicksortF(rightList)
      }
      sortedLeftListFuture() ::: middleList ::: sortedRightListFuture()
    }
  }
}

class FutureQuickSortProblem // If not defined, Intellij won't find the main method.?!
share|improve this question
    
PS: I am using Scala 2.9.2 and JRE 1.6_22 –  Markus Gumbel Dec 16 '12 at 15:18

2 Answers 2

Disclaimer: I've never personally used the (pre-2.10) standard library's actors or futures in any serious way, and there are a number of things I don't like (or at least don't understand) about the API there, compared for example to the implementations in Scalaz or Akka or Play 2.0.

But I can tell you that the usual approach in a case like this is to combine your futures monadically instead of claiming them immediately and combining the results. For example, you could write something like this (note the new return type):

import scala.actors.Futures._

def quicksortF(list: List[Int]): Responder[List[Int]] = {
  if (list.length <= 1) future(list)
  else {
    val pivot = list.head
    val leftList = list.filter(_ < pivot)
    val middleList = list.filter(pivot == _)
    val rightList = list.filter(_ > pivot)

    for {
      left <- quicksortF(leftList)
      right <- quicksortF(rightList)
    } yield left ::: middleList ::: right
  }
}

Like your vanilla implementation, this won't necessarily be very efficient, and it will also blow the stack pretty easily, but it shouldn't run out of threads.

As a side note, why does flatMap on a Future return a Responder instead of a Future? I don't know, and neither do some other folks. For reasons like this I'd suggest skipping the now-deprecated pre-2.10 standard library actor-based concurrency stuff altogether.

share|improve this answer
    
Travis, thank you for your proposal! I haven't used a Responder yet and need to understand what is does. –  Markus Gumbel Dec 17 '12 at 8:21
    
Responder is a supertype of Future and is essentially a Future that you can't claim with apply. –  Travis Brown Dec 17 '12 at 11:15

As I understand, calling apply on the Future (as you do when concatenating the results of the recursive calls) will block until the result is retrieved.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Yes, this is also my understanding. But this means a recursive call should return when both lists (left and right) are sorted. The call should only be blocked until all results are available. And this does not seem to be the case. –  Markus Gumbel Dec 16 '12 at 17:44
    
Ahh, my description was a bit misleading. It does not only block, it ends in a deadlock. Text is changed. –  Markus Gumbel Dec 16 '12 at 17:49
    
There is no locking involved, how would it deadlock then? And the blocking isn't necessary as the partitions are by construction disjoint thus the recursive calls won't overlap or interfere in another way. –  Anonymus Dec 16 '12 at 18:12
2  
Each recursion step blocks one thread until you cannot allocate more threads; do NOT use Future.apply (in 2.9) or Await.result (equivalent in 2.10), those methods are only for emergency test cases (i.e. test cases which you cannot formulate in another way), never for production code. –  Roland Kuhn Dec 16 '12 at 18:13
2  
The technical term is not “deadlock” but “thread starvation”, but changing the name does not change the cause of the problem ;-) –  Roland Kuhn Dec 16 '12 at 18:14

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