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I was initially very pleased to discover the attachment field in Access 2010. It's a feature that aesthetically irks my inner database purist but my inner lazy sod is in charge here and it does look, on the face of it, like it could make one of my current projects much easier/simpler. Happily it displays pictures/icons automatically on the forms and reports but (why is there always a but eh!) it only displays the first one and I need it to display all of them.

You can of course scroll through the attachments one at a time but I'm pretty sure my client won't wear that, despite his request that I complete the project in MS-Access which, seemingly, only has very rudimentary built in options for display :/ BUT...

I may well be wrong, I've got almost no MS-Access experience. My coding background is firmly LAMP stack and web so I'm deeply ignorant of what's on offer in the Windows/Access ecosystem. I suspect there are excellent 3rd party reporting tools that give very flexible layout but I need to see all the attachments on the form, not just the reports.

So, blundering blindly into the void my initial strategy is this...

Create a separate table for attachments where each field is an "attachment" containing a single item only. Then use scripting in the forms and reports to...

  1. Query that table for all attachments belonging to the record in question
  2. Display/Format those fields as some sort of list
  3. Dynamically append a fresh attachment field to the end of that list so the user has somewhere to upload a next attachment
  4. Make the form page refresh whenever an attachment is added so there's aways a free one.

So, my questions are...

  1. Is what I describe feasible in Access?
  2. Am I missing a much simpler / better / canonical solution?
  3. How powerful is Access's scripting language(s) with reference to display? i.e clunky or pixel perfect?
  4. It's not still Visual Basic is it? (noooooo! ;)
  5. If so are there any other scripting languages I can use within forms/reports?

Sorry, I know it's a bit of a long wooly question but I'm a fish out of water here!

Thanks,

Roger

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Let us say I have a table with an attachment:

attachment table

Let us say that I have three images in one of those attachment fields that I wish to display. I can create a query:

attachment query

After which I can create a continuous form:

attachment form

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+1 I was kind of wondering the same thing –  HelloW Dec 17 '12 at 13:15
    
Awesome! Thank you very much. Do you know if I will be able to get the images to line up horizontally or am I restricted to a vertical list layout? Sorry, I'm such an access noob, I could do all this in 5 mins if it were a web form! –  technicalbloke Dec 18 '12 at 4:28
    
If you want simplicity, you are restricted to vertical. Consider, you do not know how many images will be returned by the query, the attachment data type allows the user to select more that one image when adding, so that will be difficult to control, and the standard layout for a return of n records is vertical. If you want horizontal, you will have to pick a set number of returns and write code. I strongly suspect that in a webform you would have the same limitation. –  Fionnuala Dec 18 '12 at 11:19
    
OK, that confirms my worst suspicions. I will try and sell my client on a different platform - I don't think they'll be happy with the inflexibility of layout in Access. Thanks very much for your help. –  technicalbloke Dec 28 '12 at 1:54
    
What inflexibility? Could you store and layout an indeterminate number of images horizontally in some other package without writing any code? –  Fionnuala Dec 29 '12 at 18:48

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