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I was thinking of a way to add these two large numbers but strangely the output is 71717171...71...(repeatedly). Can you tell whats wrong with my code? (I am very new to coding so if there are any blunders please give helpful advice.)

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    using namespace std;
    char a[] = "37107287533902102798797998220837590246510135740250";
    char c[] = "46376937677490009712648124896970078050417018260538";
    char carry[52];
    int p[52], q, r;
    carry[0] = 0;
    for (int b = 49; b >= 0; b--)
    for (q = 0; q < 51; q++) {
        p[q] = (((static_cast<int>(a[b] + c[b])) - 96) % 10) + static_cast<int>(carry[q]);
        (carry[q + 1]) = (static_cast<int>(a[b] + c[b])) / 10;
    }
    for (r = 0; r < 51; r++) {
        cout << p[r];
    }
    cin.clear();
    cin.get();
}
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closed as too localized by akappa, BЈовић, DaveRandom, Mark, tereško Dec 16 '12 at 17:48

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6  
Is this a code golf contest? –  0x499602D2 Dec 16 '12 at 16:17
    
I get that b loops over all the digits, but what does q do?! When you add two numbers, you don't add each digit of one number to every digit of the other, just corresponding digits. –  David Schwartz Dec 16 '12 at 16:18
1  
Why do you have nested for loops for addition? –  dmckee Dec 16 '12 at 16:18
1  
@David It looks like a kind of badly specified minimal BigNum implementation. You see that from time to time as a beginner's exercise. –  dmckee Dec 16 '12 at 16:19
1  
Why did you tag this C? It's clearly C++. Please don't add random tags for other languages. –  David Heffernan Dec 16 '12 at 16:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd suggest that you look again at what how you are adding. In paricular I would suggest that do it the school-boy way: one column at a time starting from the ones and working upward.

So something like this:

char p[strlen(a)+2]; // In the same representation as a and c
p[strlen(a)+1]='\0'; // make sure p is null terminated
p[0] = '0'; // make sure the first digit of p is zero if we don't carry into it
int carry = 0;
for (int b=strlen(a); b>=0; --b) {
    int digit1 = a[b] - '0';
    int digit2 = c[b] - '0';
    int raw_result = digit1 + digit2 + carry;
    int result = raw_result % 10;
    carry = raw_result / 10;
    p[b+1] = result + '0'; // Question for the student: why p+1?
}
if (carry != 0) p[0] = carry;

So what else have I changed?

  • I decode the digits sperately, and use '0' to get the value to subtract. This makes what I am doing clearer and means I don't have to recall what to subtract each time I use them later on.
  • I've jumped through some hoops to ensure that the result (p) is long enough and has both the right starting and ending values.

What deficencies remain?

  • It only works if both inputs are the same length. Question for the student: how do you fix that?
  • Using strlen for the length is very inefficient. How do you fix that?
  • Related to the length issue is, what do you do with unneeded leading zeros? This suggests that reading-order character strings might not be the best representational format for your BigNums. What would be better?
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-1 giving ready-to-use code to a homework problem. that's stupid and does the opposite of helping the OP. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 16 '12 at 17:46

Cleaned up your code a bit:

#include <iostream>

int main() {
  using namespace std;
  char a[] = "37107287533902102798797998220837590246510135740250";
  char c[] = "46376937677490009712648124896970078050417018260538";
  char carry[51];
  int p[51], q, r;
  p[0] = 0;
  carry[50] = 0;
  int sum = 0;
  for (q = 50; q > 0; q--) {
    sum = ((int)a[q-1]+ (int)c[q-1]) - 96;
    p[q] = sum % 10 + carry[q];
    carry[q-1] = sum / 10;
  }
  p[0] = carry[0];
  for (r = 0; r < 51; r++) {
    cout <<  p[r];
  }
  cin.clear();
  cin.get();
}

Note that this only works for 50-digit numbers, and there can be a leading zero if there is no carry with the sum of the most significant digits. You may want to make it more general.

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Is it, in fact, a homework problem? I don't see any indication of that in the question. –  Jeremy Friesner Dec 16 '12 at 17:48

Three issues: - you are not subtracting 96 while computing carry. - you have to display the digits in the reverse order. - you have to display the last carry if it is set

Try this:

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    using namespace std;
    char a[] = "37107287533902102798797998220837590246510135740250";
    char c[] = "46376937677490009712648124896970078050417018260538";
    char carry[52];
    int p[52], q, r;
    carry[0] = 0;
    q = 0;
    for (int b = 49; b >= 0; b--) {
        p[q] = (((static_cast<int>(a[b] + c[b])) - 96) % 10) + static_cast<int>(carry[q]);
        (carry[q + 1]) = ((static_cast<int>(a[b] + c[b])) - 96) / 10;
        q++;
    }
    if(carry[51] == 1) {
        count << carry[51];
    }
    for (r = 50; r >= 0; r--) {
        cout << p[r];
    }
    cin.clear();
    cin.get();
}
share|improve this answer
    
You still have the nested loop. Why do you have a nest loop for addition? This is not multiplication. –  dmckee Dec 16 '12 at 16:28
    
-1 Do you think it is intelligent to post a ready-to-copy solution to a homework problem? –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 16 '12 at 16:29
    
this code does not work anyways and dont worry i wont cheat –  Shikhar Shukla Dec 16 '12 at 16:32
    
Oops, my bad... updated the code... –  ATOzTOA Dec 16 '12 at 16:38

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