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I have Json post to controller with MVC 4 visual studio 2012... I have successfully pass json data along with AntiForgeryToken to controller but i dont know how exactly to test if it is really working 'the correctness of AntiForgeryToken'. also i tried to add 9999 in __RequestVerificationToken code on client side to see if it verifies on server side and it does!!!. my guessing is it shouldn't if i am correct???? here is my code

<script type="text/javascript">

$(document).ready(function (options) {
    $('#id_login_submit').click(function () {

        var token = $('input[name=__RequestVerificationToken]').val();

//var token = $('input[name=__RequestVerificationToken]').val()+"99999";
//   alert("token :: "+token);

        var _authetication_Data = { _UserName: $('#u1').val(), _Password: $('#p1').val(), "__RequestVerificationToken": token }


            $.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: "/Account/ProcessLoginRequest",
                data: JSON.stringify({ model: _authetication_Data }),
                dataType: "json",
                contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
                success: function (response) {
                    alert(response);
                }
            });

    });
});

@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    @Html.AntiForgeryToken()
    @Html.ValidationSummary(true)

    @Html.LabelFor(m => m._UserName)
    @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m._UserName, new { id = "u1"})


    @Html.LabelFor(m => m._Password)
    @Html.PasswordFor(m => m._Password, new { id = "p1"})


    <input type="button" id="id_login_submit" value="Login" />
}

   [HttpPost]
   [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
    public JsonResult ProcessLoginRequest(LoginModel model)
    {
        string returnString = null;


      if (ModelState.IsValid && WebSecurity.Login(model._UserName, model._Password, persistCookie: false))
        {
            returnString = "user is authenticated";     
        }

        else
        { returnString = "user not authenticated"; }

        return Json(returnString, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
    }
share|improve this question
    
Side note: please make sure you always hang your event onto form submit and not button press. This is because you can still submit form but hitting Enter on a text input. –  Ilia G Dec 16 '12 at 17:10

2 Answers 2

Yes, you can... but you could try to use serialize() method. Something like this:

$.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: "/Account/ProcessLoginRequest",
                data: $("#your_form_id").serialize(),
                dataType: "json",
                contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
                success: function (response) {
                    alert(response);
                }
            });

When you use serialize method, this take all elements inside a form tag and serialize into an array of data, something like { field: value, field2: value2, field3: value3 }, and the Token will be an input hidden, so, it will be on the serialize result.

For more information, take a look at documentation: http://api.jquery.com/serialize/

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It works for me, and actually I'm not using a Form, this is my code:

View code:

var token = $('input[name=__RequestVerificationToken]').val();        

        $.post(url, { Telefono: telefono, MensajeSMS: mensajeSMS, __RequestVerificationToken : token }, ...............

Controller method, just sign with apropiate attribute:

[ValidateAntiForgeryToken] public JsonResult jsonEnviarSMS(string Telefono, string MensajeSMS)

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